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Full text of "South Bend and the men who have made it. Historical, descriptive, biographical"

THE 1 
PUBLIC LIBE 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TIL DEN bOUNDA TIONS 



SOUTH BEND 



AND 



THE MEN WHO HAVE MADE IT, 



Historical, Descriptive, Biographical. 



ILLUSTRATED. 



Compiled by 
ANDERSON & COOLEY. 



SOUTH BEND: 

THE TRIBUNE PRINTING CO. 

1901. 



NEW YORK 

-■ LLNOX AND 
,, FOUNDATIONS 

1918 L 



PRESS OF THE TRIBUNE PRINTING CO. 
SOUTH BEND, IND. 







H\ permission o( publishers ol " La Sulle in the Valley of the St. Joseph " 

No longer Monarch of ti\e scene, 

He looks -witr( sad, prophetic eyes, 

flrid sees— -wriere orice Y\is realrr\ i\ad been— 
Tl^e nqoderri city in its grandeur rise, 




Historical Painting in St. Joseph County Court House. Liy permission of Arthur Thomas, Artist, N. Y. 

LA SALLE AT THE PORTAGE, DECEMBER 5TH, 1679. 



SOUTH BEND. 



SOUTH BEND! No inland city on the 
American continent has attained greater 
renown or displayed more fully those 
sterling virtues of modern manhood and human 
progress, than has this beautiful city located on 
the banks of the magnificent and picturesque 
St. Joseph river. 

No fairer spot for the location of a thriving 
city could have been selected, and to-day no 
more flourishing city is to be found than 
South Bend, the pride of Indiana and the home 
of some of the greatest manufacturing estab- 
lishments of the world. It is surrounded by 
an agricultural region which is unsurpassed in 
fertility and natural beauty, while through the 
city flows one of the most fascinatingly beau- 
tiful rivers on the continent. The "old St. Joe" 
has been the admiration and inspiration of poet 
and painter alike, and its sparkling waters and 
swift running current has furnished the 



motive power for some of the largest manu- 
factories in the country. 

South Bend is most charmingly situated, on 
what was once a level plain covered with white 
oak trees, skirted on the one side by a range of 
beautiful hills, and by the broad Kankakee 
valley on another, while gently rolling 
prairies in another direction extend almost to 
the border line of the city. 

It is scarcely a matter for wonder that this 
great city of nearly 40,000 inhabitants has 
sprung from an obscure Indian trading post in 
the wilderness of northern Indiana almost 
within the existence of a single individual. 
South Bend to-day is the fourth largest city in 
Indiana, and by far the largest on the great 
railway lines between Chicago, Toledo and 
Detroit. It is located not far from the famous 
water shed where the Kankakee river rises, 
and flowing down through the wide valley 



10 



SOUTH BEND. 



reaches the Mississippi river and leading to 
the Gulf of Mexico. 

On the opposite side of this shed flows a 
slight ridge or rivulet and its current is carried 
into the St. Joseph river through the great 
lakes to the River St. Lawrence and thence to 
the Atlantic Ocean. 

South Bend is located on historic ground 
for near its northern boundary is the place 




KOBERT CUEVALIEU HE LA SALLE. 

where the first white man who came to explore 
this region of the country first landed upon the 
soil of Indiana. 

According to reliable historians it was in 1679 
that Robert Cavalier de LaSalle. with his party 
of explorers came from Lake Michigan up the 
St. Joseph river to the old Indian portage, an.l 
crossing over to the head waters of the Kanka- 
kee river, journeyed down that stream to the 
Illinois river, and thence on to the Mississippi, 
on his perilous but important tour of discovery. 
The St. Joe at that time was called the "River 
of the Miamis," by the Indian tribe of that 
name which inhabited this region of country. 

Other Europeans had essayed this passage of 
the western wilderness before LaSalle. and 
Fathers Allouez. Dablon and Marquette had 
reached the Mississippi by the way of the 
Wisconsin. Chicago and Illinois rivers. 
LaSalle, however, was the first to seek the 
Kankakee route, and he brought with him a 
Mohegan Indian from New England, who knew 
the route to the Mississippi by the portage 
from the St. Joseph to the Kankakee river, 
which was known to all the tribes of American 
Indians as the shortest one from the great 



lakes to "the great river" that flows into the 
gulf. 

At that time the Miamis had a large village 
at the head of the portage on what is now the 
western border of Portage prairie, in German 
township, and while here LaSalle. by his 
eloquence and generosity, averted a war 
between the Miamis, the Illinois and the 
Iroquois tribes of Indians. 

PIONEER SETTLERS. 

The pioneer settler of South Bend was Pierre 
F.Navarre an educated Frenchman from Michi- 
gan, who came here in 1820 and established a 
trading post for the American Fur Company. 
He built the first habitation for a white man in 
South Bend, which is still standing and estab- 
lished his trading store on the east side of the 
river near Michigan street, and in close prox- 
imity to the spot where Samuel Leeper's 
residence now stands. The Pottowatomie 
Indians were then the sole inhabitants of this 
region of this country, the Miamis haviDg 
migrated southward to the vicinity of the 
Wabash and near Fort Wayne and Toledo. 

Although the main portion of the tribe was 
located further south in Marshall and Fulton 
Counties they all came to South Bend in 
order to reach the trading posts at Niles and 
St. Joseph, and every spring and autumn 
they passed this point in numbers with great 
loads of furs, maple sugar, baskets and other 
articles to exchange for money and whiskey. 
The old trails of those days have now be- 
come city streets and main highways. Vis- 







JBJ 




M*A 




HIP* Xri 


***** **8i 




wL;v Jfi 







ST. JOE FALLS. 

tula avenue, along the river to the Turkey 
Creek road, and almost southeast in a dired 
line, was the Fort Wayne trail. Michigan 
street marks another of these trails, and led 
to the Pottowatomie settlements in Marshall 
County, around Maxinkuckee lake. Others 



SOUTH BEND. 



11 



there were on Michigan and Portage avenues 
leading west and northwest, the old Sumption 
Prairie road that went to Plymouth, and an- 
other which, leaving the old portage road, 
went along the line of what is now the Crum's 
Town road. 

Pierre F Navarre was popluar with the 
Indians, and soon after his arrival he married 
a Pottowatomie squaw, and raised a family of 
six children, one of whom became a Mormon 
preacher and lawyer, and another, Anthony 
Navarre, became prominent as a lawyer and 
teacher. Navarre accompanied the Indians 
when they were deported west in 1840, but he 
returned to this city where he died in 186-; 



the fact that its hanks were the abode of num- 
erous herds of elk. 

The pristine beauty and luxuriance of the 
St. Joseph valley was then virtually undis- 
turbed by the progressive and civilizing hand 
of man, and the scene was surpassingly beau- 
tiful everywhe: e in its natural grandeur and 
barbaric simplicity. The prairies in their 
summer robes were clothed with rank grasses, 
studded and starred with flowers of various 
hues, and the oak forests, cleared of under- 
brush by the annual Indian fires, were like 
vast plains canopied by the luxuriant over- 
hanging branches. Prairie chickens swarmed 
the Kankakee marsh and prairies, and the 




THE OLD PORTAGE, OPPOSITE RIVERVIEW CEMETERY. 



Northern Indiana was at this time a verit- 
able paradise of the Indians, the hunter and 
the trapper. The furs and peltry contrib- 
uted by this region to the American Fur 
Company was largely in excess of any other 
region, and consisted of deer, wolf, black bear, 
fox, mink, otter, wild cat. raccoon and musk- 
rat. They abounded within a radius of not 
more than fifty miles from South Bend. The 
moss and flag houses of the prolific beaver 
studded the open marshes everywhere, and 
this region was also the favorite haunt of the 
elk and buffalo, and Elkhart river received 
its name, during the aboriginal period, from 



Indians revelled in all the delights of nature 
and her lavish productions. 

This was the condition of the St. Joseph val- 
ley in those early days. The axe and plow 
were yet to come. The subjugation ot the wil- 
derness was yet to be begun by these men of 
vigorous mould and energy who came later and 
who made "the wilderness to blossom as the 
rose." They did not come like the early- 
traders to barter with the savages, or the 
hunter to follow the chase. They were of the 
race that founded empires and reared the 
standards of civilization, and they came to 
build up homes for themselves and their 



12 



SOUTH BEND. 



posterity. They were obliged to struggle hard, 
but their mothers, wives and daughters aided 
in the struggle. 

The sons and fatheis, with axe and saw. and 
plow and hoe, toiled from sun 10 sun to pro- 
vide for the wants of those around them, an 1 
the women shared their trials and nardships. 
The heavy sward of the prairie was turned 
and sowed to kindly crops, and the great king 
of commerce, the waving corn, a ose in the 
fields to contribute to the sustenance of the 
toilers and their kin. Then followed the mer- 
chant, the artisan and the mechanic, and all 
contributed to the onward march of civiliza- 
tion and progress. 

In a few years the entire aspect was 
changed. As if by the hand of a magician the 
school house was reared; churches opened 
their doors to the devotees; roads were con- 
structed, villages were laid out and all the 
appliances of civilization, order, progress and 
prosperity were set in motion. Mills were 
erected along the flowing river, factories were 
built at available points and boats were 
lunched upon the streams. 

Then followed the railroad and the tele- 
graph, and in a few more years gigantic in- 
dustries were developed from the primitive 
shops; thousands came to take the place of 
the ambitious few; the domain of the city 
extended, and then came the wealth, the refine- 
ment, the culture, and the grand development 
of the great present. 

It would seem as if a leaf had been torn 
from some dream of Fairyland, but it is simply 
the actual history of the time, and some of 
those who labored and planned in these old 
days of struggle and hardship, are yet living 
to recount the wonderful stoiy, and to empha- 
size the greatness of man, and the results 
which are possible of accomplishment by his 
genius, industry and intelligence. 

THE FIRST WHITE SETTLER. 

Alexis Coquillard was the first white man to 
settle here and he came to this locality in 
1823, with the intention of making it his per- 
manent abode. He was a native of Detroit, 
and was twenty-eight years old when he came 
to South Bend. His wife was formerly Miss 
Frances C. Comparet, also of Detroit, and she 
followed her husband to this wilderness the 
following year. He was a stalwart Frenchman, 
six feet in height and heavily built. He was 
fearless and energetic and the Indians soon 
learned to respect, if not to fear, him. Mrs. 
Coquillard was a lady of great courage and 
was a valuable aid to her sturdy husband in 
their pioneer life. She was ever active in 



assisting and teaching the Indians who were 
all her devoted friends. 

Mr. Coquillard came here as the agent of 
the American Fur Company, having, in con- 
nection with Francis Comparet of Fort Wayne, 
purchased the agency of the Fur Company for 
all the region of the upper lakes. Subse- 
quently they purchased the exclusive control 
of these regions. At South Bend, Mr. Coquil- 
lard was located near the Water street bridge 
on Michigan street. The influence of his great 
personality was soon manifest, and afterward, 
in connection with Col. L. M. Taylor, he be- 
came the owner of all the land upon whi< !i 
the city of South Bend now stands. At every 
stage of progress he was an inspiring factor. 




ALEXIS COQUILLAKD. 

and he contributed largely to the growth of 
the future city. He granted lands to manufac- 
toiies, to churches and for the erection of 
school houses, and was ever active in promot- 
ing the interests of the city. He owned the 
water power on the river and constructed the 
famous Kankakee race, and in 1839, in connec- 
tion with John A. Henricks and John Rush, 
under a grant from the legislature, he built the 
first flouring mill in South Bend, which was 
known as the Kankakee Custom mill. 

He had previously constructed a saw mill, 
and later he built a second flour mill called 
the Merchant's Mill, which was afterward re- 
moved and converted into a woolen factory. 
lie erected buildings both lor residence and 



SOUTH BEND. 



13 



business purposes, and the advancement of 
the town and his townsmen was his chief aim 
and desire. He toiled for the prosperity and 
development of the city, and was evey ready 
to assist the new owner who brought intelli- 
gence and industry into this new field of 
civilization. 

He made a study of the Indian character 
and knew it well. He understood their sev- 
eral languages and won their unlimited confi- 
dence and respect, and he was selected as 
interpreter and government agent to carry 
into effect the various treaties made with the 
Ottawa, Chippewa. Miami, Chicago and San- 
dusky .Indians. He successfully conducted 
the treaties at Tippecanoe, Chicago and other 
places after the peace of 1814, and was ap- 
pointed in 1840 to conduct the Pottowatomie 
emigration, which he accomplished at a heavy 
personal outlay, and loss, through the duplici- 
ty of a trusted agent named Alverson, who 
defrauded him of the $40 000 paid by the gov- 
ernment for that purpose. 

Mr. Coquillard died January 8, 1855, under 
most distressing circumstances. His flouring 
mill, which stood on the site of the Hil] 
Brothers west mill, had burned on January 
and he was engaged examining the ruins, 
when he fell from a beam, about eighteen feet 
from the ground, striking on his head, and 
death resulted in an hour. His loss was a 
public misfortune and his funeral was at- 
tended by all the residents of the town, and 
in the funeral cortege that bove his remains 




ON THE RIVER. 

to Notre Dame were numbers whom he had 
aided to commercial positions, and many 
whose necessities he had unsparingly re- 
lieved. Business was entirely suspended 
and the entire community joined in the gen- 
eral sorrow. Mrs. Coquillard died in 1880. 
Mr. Coquillard had an only child, Alexis T. 
Coquillard, who was born here February 13, 
1836. He was educated in this vicinity and 



at Notre Dame, and after a useful an eventful 
life died but a few years ago. 

COL. L. M. TAYLOR. 

Col. Lathrop M. Taylor was the next im- 
portant personage to locate here, and he came 
in 1827. Col. Taylor was an Indian trader 
lor Samuel Hanna & Co.. of Port Wayne, and 




COL. LATHROP M. TAYLOR. 

afterward became a successful and prominent 
merchant. He also engaged in the milling 
and manufacturing business. He was a man 
of vigor and enterprise and lived to a ven- 
erable age, his death occurring in 1891. He 
lived to see this great city develop from a 
wilderness to one of the foremost manufac- 
turing centers of the continent, and one of 
the leading cities of the west. 

Col. Taylor was appointed postmaster of 
the little village which was then called 
"Southold," but which a year later was 
changed to South Bend, the name given it 
by Alexis Coquillard, and which it has since 
retained. He was also the first clerk and 
recorder of St. Joseph County. Coquillard 
and Taylor secured from the government a 
good title to a large tract of land in this 
locality, and March 2S, 1831, they platted the 
town of South Bend, which according to the 
records was "located on the west and south 
banks of the Big St. Josef river." 

The population of the town at that time 
was 168, and the two pioneers, who were both 




'."TIPPECANOE," RESIDENCE OF EON. CLEM STUDEBAKER. 



SOUTH BEND. 



15 



enterprising and liberal business men, made 
generous provisions for the future growth of 
the town by donating lots to several religious 
denominations on which churches were 
erected, and also lands for school purposes 
and a burying ground now known as the City 
Cemetery. To-day many of the handsome 
churches, imposing school buildings, and 
other ediflcies are located on grounds which 
were set apart at the very inception of the 
town for these uses by the public spirited pio- 
neers Alexis Coquillard and Lathrop M. Tay- 
lor. 

THE FIRST BURIAL. 

The first burial in South Bend, as nearly as 
can be ascertained, was that of the old Pot- 
towatomie chieftan, Kon-i-ja. When the 

first white settlers came here the body of this 
dead chief, who had died yeais before, was 
found sitting in mummied dignity and loneli- 
ness on the banks of the St. Joseph river, 
near where the stand pipe of the water works 
is now erected. The skeleton was draped 
in gaudy blankets, and enclosed in a log tomb, 
whose covering was boughs of evergreen. At 
stated times his faithful successors made pil- 
grimages to this tomb and deposited their 
tokens of love and veneration, which consist- 
ed of trinkets, war implements, herbs, food 
and raiment, which were also designed to help 
and cheer him on his journey through the 
spirit land. 

One winter's night the old chief's form mys- 
teriously disappeared, and the awe struck In- 
dians found the tomb empty on the following; 
morning. Long afterward it was learned tha! 
two young settlers had quietly dug a grave 
under the place where the old chief was seat 
ed, and had placed his bones therein where 
they remained until on excavating tne ground 
for laying the city's water mains, the skull 
and some of the bones of Kon-i-ja, with a 
number of implements and trinkets were 
brought to the surface. 

Another "Happy Hunting Ground" of the 
Indians was located at Rum Village, where 
the bodies of Indian children, wrapped in 
blankets, swing gentle among the branches of 
great trees, and above the mounds of their il- 
lustrious ancestors. Others were located at 
Raccoon Village; at Leeper Hill and a third 
in the vicinity of Island Park. All of these 
have disappeared, save the one at Leeper Hill, 
which afterward became the property of the 
early Catholics, and was used as a burial 
ground before Cedar Grove cemetery was es- 
tablished in 1S44. It is now marked by a high 
mound, surmounted by a cross, inscribed to 



the memory of the christian Indians and 
French pioneeis buried beneath, and surround- 
ed by a group of evergreen trees. 

Jacob Bowman, in 1S35, gave the name to 
Bowman's Cemetery, which originally com- 
prised a half acre, and was designed as a rest- 
ing place for deceased Dunkards, or German 
Baptists. Nearby also is a tract of ground 
set apart for the burial of the members of the 
Jewish fraternity in this city, who have died. 
THE CITY CEMETERY. 

The City Cemetery, the gift of Alexis Co- 
quillard and L. M. Taylor, is located in the 
western part of the city, and comprises nearly 
twenty-two acres of giound Here have been 
laid to rest the forms of those who contributed 
so largely to the growth and development ol 
this city, and the mute inscriptions on head 
stone and monolith tell the story of life and 
death, of struggle and reward, of trail and con- 
quest. It is a veritable "God's Acre," and one 
of the most impressively interesting of all the 
interesting points of this city. Here genera- 
tions have followed generations and an epi- 
tome of the progress of South Bend is found in 
the marble monuments which adorn the many 
graves. 

One of the many interesting monuments is 
located near the East gate and covers the re- 
mains of the grandfather and grandmother 
of William McKinley, president of the United 
States. These worthy ancestors both died 
on the same day, August 20. 1847, and on the 




MOONLIGHT AT LAKE ST. MARY. 

forty-third anniversary of their wedding. They 
were united in their lives, and in death were 
not divided. The inscription also bears these 
words: "They lived and died in the Christian 
faith, and left a large family to mourn their 
loss." 

PIONEER DAYS. 

One of the older residents was Edmond P. 
Taylor, a brother of L. M. Taylor, who came 
here in 1S30, and assisted his brother in his 



16 



SOUTH BEND 



Indian store. "Pitts" Taylor, as he was 
familiarly called, afterward continued the 
business, and then commenced packing pork. 
He was the pioneer pork packer in the state. 
He afterward successfully engaged in the 
lumber business on the race. 

In 1831 this enterprising pioneer village be- 
gan to show indications of mercantile ad- 
vancement and was increasing in population. 
Although Michigan street was then, as now, 
the business street of the town, the trees 
standing in the middle of the road were not 
cut down, except as they were needed for 



father of Alexis Coquillard, the founder of 
the Coquillard Wagon Company, opened a 
similar house of entertainment at Pearl and 
Washington streets, and he was followed by 
Calvin Lilley at the corner of St. Joseph and 
Pearl streets. 

The first keel boat for freighting on the 
St. Joe river was built by Peter Johnson in 
1831, and for many years it carried passengers 
and freight into and out of the city, having 
a landing at the foot of Market street, now 
Colfax avenue, and from that time until 1851, 
when railroads were built into the St. Josenh 




WASHINGTON STREET EAST FROM MAIN. 



fire wood and fence rails, until the following 
year. In 1832 the Michigan road was con- 
structed and this necessitated the cutting out 
of the timber standing in Michigan and 
Water streets and gave the needed space for 
street uses. 

Samuel L. Cottrell, also came to this local- 
ity in 1827, and was the first sheriff elected 
in St. Joseph County, proving a most faithful 
and efficient official in every resnect. Peter 
Johnson iu 1S31 established a tavern at the 
southeast corner of Michigan and Washing- 
ton streets, and later Benjamin Coquillard, the 



valley, several steamboats were engaged in 
the transportation business on the river. 

THE TOWN OF ST. JOSEPH. 

At the outset South Bend had wnat thieat- 
ened to become a formidable rival, in a town 
that was started two miles further down the 
river, by William Brookfteld, the first surveyor 
to locate in this vicinity which was called St. 
Joseph. Considerable energy was manifested 
bv the projectors of the new town, and when 
the county of St. Joseph was organized in 1S30, 



SOUTH BEND. 



17 



the county seat was located at the new town 
of St. Joseph. In 1S31, however. Messrs. Co- 
quillard and Taylor succeeded in having the 
county seat removed to South Bend, and to 
accomplish it they donated the land upon whicl: 
the county buildings stand, and also pledged 
the payment of $3,000 in cash. 

With the removal of the County Seat to 
South Bend, the town of St. Joseph ceased to 
thrive. All the plans of its originator went 
awry, and he soon after left the country. A 
large portion of its site is now converted into 
the beautiful new Riverview Cemetery. 



and a number of new comers to this section 
were induced to locate there, it was poposed 
to erect an extensive college there, and a 
charter was secured for that purpose. A pub- 
lic ferry was established at this point, stores 
and taverns were built, and for a short time 
its prospects of advancement seemed superior 
to those of South Bend. 

The embryonic town, however, about this 
time, was given the sarcastic name of "Pin 
Hook," and this title and the panic of 1S37 
proved its downfall. The proposed college 
was given up, after a faculty had been selec- 




RESIDENCE OF W. L. KIZER. 



THE TOWN OF PORTAGE. 

Another town in the vicinity of St. Joseph, 
staited by Judge Egbert, and called Portage, 
also attempted to become a rival of this city, 
and much genius, energy, and money was ex- 
pended in exploiting the claims of this town 
which maintained its rivalry for a few years. 

The town was platted and recorded in 1834 
by Elisha Egbert and the Rev. Andrew Morse, 



ted and a bell purchased, and in a few years 
the town entirely passed out oi existence, al- 
though the site is still known by its famous 
and fatal title of "Pin Hook." 

ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY. 

St. Joseph County was organized in 1830, 

and Adam Smith, Lambeit McComb and Levi 

F. Arnold were commissioned as Justices of 

the Peace by Gov. James B. Ray, at the resi- 



18 



SOUTH BEND 



dence of Alexis Coqitillard, and were sworn 
into office by L. M. Taylor the first clerk of the 
county. 

When Col. Taylor circulated his petition 
for the removal of the county seat to this city, 
he obtained 13S signatures, showing that the 
population had materially increased within a 
very few years, and in May 1831, the new Com- 
missioners Absalom Holcomb, Chester Sage, 
Col. John Jackson and William M. Hood 
changed the county seat to South Bend. The 
first county officers were: Jonn B. Lasly, treas- 
urer; James Nixon, assessor; Daniel A. Ful- 
lerton, collector of taxes; Benjamin Potter. 
Thomas Skiles and Jacob Keith constables; 



County. John S McClelland, Capt. Anthony 
DeFrees, Samuel Studebaker, John Massey, 
who was afterward tax collector, Nehemiah 
B. Griffith, who established the first feiry 
across the river. Christian Wolf, Samuel Mar- 
tin, William Stanfield, Tyra W. Bray, Robert 
Wade, Capt. Lot Day, John D. Lastley, Wil- 
liam Creviston, James DeGroote, Hiram Day- 
ton, Joseph Haney, Levi Antrim, Louis San- 
comb, William Wood, John Becioft. Peter 
Neddo, John A. Caine, Andrew Mack, Oliver 
Bennett, Calvin Lilley, and Solomon Bargdail. 
The population of the town was 128. 

The first physician to locate in this city 
was Dr. Jacob Hardman. He was a Virginian. 




ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Jacob Cripe and John Heag, overseers of the 
poor, and Daniel Eiler and Samuel Cannon, 
fence viewers. 

Among the first acts of the new commission- 
ers was to issue licenses to the American Fur 
Company, and Samuel Hanna & Co., the latter 
being represented by L. M. Taylor, allowing 
them to vend foreign merchandise on payment 
of an annual fee of $10.00. 

EARLY SETTLERS. 
Among the early settlers aoout this time 
were: James P., and Daniel Antrim, and the 
former became first Probate Judge in the 



and came here in 1831. He lived to be 82 years 
of age, and for fifty-four years was a resident 
of South Bend. Then came Dr. J. A. Hen- 
ricks, Dr. Harvey Humphreys, Dr. James B. 
Finley, Dr. Daniel Dayton and Louis Humph- 
reys, the noble fore runners of those sturdy 
practitioners that labored for the welfare of 
mankind. 

THE BLACK HAWK WAR. 

An important event in the early history of 

South Bend was the Black Hawk war which 

occurred in 1S32. The pioneers of this little 

village became fearful that the Pottowatomies 



SOUTH BEND. 



19 



would join with old Chief Black Hawk in his 
open war fare against the whites, and exten- 
sive preparations for defense against an In- 
dian attack were made. A iort, blockhouse 
and stockade were constructed on the trian- 
gular piece of ground in front of the city prop- 
erty, where the water works stand pipe is now 
erected, and a regiment of volunteers was has- 




tily organized, with L. M. Taylor, as its 
colonel, F. R. Tutt, lieutenant colonel and Dr. 
Jacob Hardman as major. 

The regiment, however, never saw any act- 
ive service, for the war had ended before it 
reached South Bend and the neighboring Pot- 
towatomies remained friendly and harmless 
L. M. Taylor, however, gained the title of "Col- 
onel" from this episode, and he retained it 
until his death. 

TOWN ORGANIZATION. 

The town of South Bend was laid out in 
March 1831, but was not organized under town 
government until 1835, when William P. Howe, 
Horatio Chapin, Peter Johnson, John Massey 
and James A. Mann were elected trustees. 
Horatio Chapin was president of the Board 
from 1835 to 1837. In 1837 E. P. Taylor was 
elected president, and F. R. Tutt, clerk. This 
town organization was subsequently aband- 
oned and was not revived until 1S45, and the 
first meeting of the new board was held Jan- 
uary 31 of that year. John Brownfield was 
chosen president and William H. Patterson, 
clerk. The town was divided into five wards, 
and at the first annual election Jonn Brown- 
field, B. F. Price, William H. Patterson, Rick- 
etson Burroughs and Joseph Andre were elec- 
ted trustees. 

INCORPORATED AS A CITY. 

The town organization continued until 1865, 
when a petition was presented to the trustees 
asking for a special election to decide whether 
the city should be organized under a general 
charter of incorporation, and it was decided 
in the affirmative on May 22, 1865. On June 
5, of that year, an election was held and 543 



votes were cast. William G. George was elec- 
ted the first mayor of the city, and a full board 
of councilmen was also chosen. The follow- 
ing were the first officers of the city of South 
Bend: 

Mayor, W. G. George; clerk, George H. Al- 
ward; treasurer, George W. Matthews; mar- 
shal, Daniel Roof; engineer, Washington Saun- 
ders; assessor, Elisha Sumption; councilmen, 
1st. ward, William Miller and John Klingel; 
2d. ward, William Miller, Esq. and Thomas S. 
Stanfield; 3d. ward, John Gallagher and Israel 
C. Sweet. 

In December 1866 the council passed a reso- 
lution annexing the town of Lowell, which had 
been laid out in 1837, on the east side of the 
river opposite South Bend. The town was 
quite extensively built up, and at first was 
called Dennison, but later the name was 
changed to Lowell. By the annexation of 1866, 
however, it became a part of the city of South 
Bend and formed the fourth ward of the muni- 
cipality. 

MAYORS OF SOUTH BEND. 

Since the incorporation of the City of South 
Bend in 1865 the following gentlemen have 
served in the office of Mayor of the municipal- 
ity: W. G. George, 1865-66; Dr. Louis Humph- 
reys, 1868 to 1872; William Miller, 1872 to 1876; 




RESIDENCE OP JACOB WOOLVERTON. 

A. N. Thomas, 1876 to 1878; Lucius G. Tong, 
1878 to 1880; Levi J. Ham, 1880 to 1884; Geo. 
W. Loughman, 1884 to 1SSS; William H. Long- 



20 



SOUTH BEND, 



ley, 18S8 to 1892; David R. Leeper, 1892 to 
1894; D. B. J. Schafer, 1894 to 1898, and Schuy- 
ler Colfax, the present incumbent elected in 
1898. 

EARLY FERRIES. 

The fiist ferries across the St. Joseph river 
were authorized by the board of County Com- 
missioners in 1831. and the initial ferry was 
established at the east end of Water street, 
by N. B. Griffith, who paid an annual license 
fee of two dollars. He was also required "to 
keep a good and sufficient flat or boat to con- 



required to '"keep two able bodied men to at- 
tend to said ferry." And it was also pro- 
vided that "all persons tiaveling with or form- 
ing part of a load should pass over in wagons 
at said ferry free." 

An additional ferry was ordered established 
"across the river on the country road leading 
f:om South Bend to Niles, and that a boat 
should be placed thereon not less than 45 
feet long and 12 feet wide. ' Elisha Egbert 
secured the license to run this ferry on the 
payment of ten dollars per annum. 

In January, 1835, Alexis Coquillard ob- 




From " La Salle in the Valley of the St. Joseph. 
WHERE SOUTH BEND DERIVED ITS NAME. 



vey conveniently over said river two horses 
and a wagon at one time." The commission- 
ers also fixed a scale of charges varying from 
31% cents, for two horses and a wagon; 6% 
cents for each person to two cents for hogs 
and sheep per head. 

In November 1832 the commissioners 
ordered the licensed ferrymen, N. B. Griffith, 
to have constructed a boat forty-five feet long 
and twelve feet wide for his ferry, and al- 
lowed him until January 1. 1S33, to have the 
same completed and ready for use. He was 



tained a license to keep a ferry across the river 
from Market street, now Colfax avenue, with 
a boat of the same dimensions of the others, 
and under the same regulations as to charges. 
Mr. Coquillard transfeired his license in 1840 
to William Graham and Robert Wade. 

RIVER NAVIGATION. 

The navigation of the St. Joseph river was 
first attempted in 1S30 by two sailors named 
Masters and Tipsorf, who made a number of 
successful trips in a keel boat from the mouth 



SOUTH BEND. 



21 



of the river to South Bend. The following year 
the first steamboat was launched on the river. 
It was named the "Newburyport", and was built 
at Presque Isle. Through some defect in iti 
construction, however, it was found to be ill 
adapted to navigating the river. It made but 
one trip, and only got as far as Berrien and 
the attempt was then given up. 

In 1S33 two stern wheel boats of light 
draught, called the "Matilda Barney" and 
"David Crockett," commenced making success- 
ful trips on the river and went as far as the 
rapids at Michawaka, but on account of the 
swiftness of the current were unable to p:o- 
ceed further. From that time boats continued 



gates from this county and representing the 
interests of the St. Joseph river attended, but 
they we:e unsuccessful in obtaining any 
favorable action on the part of the convention 
and all further attempts to secure national aid 
to improve the river were abandoned. 

THE WATER POWER. 

The great water power of the St. Joseph river 
was first utilized in 1S35 by Joseph Fellows, 
Garrett V. Dennison, Thomas W. Alcott, James 
McKower, William J. Worth and John Van 
Buren, all of whom came from the state of New 
York. They purchased the river rights from 
Alexis Coquillard, and in 1837 work was com- 




THE MILBURN MEMORIAL CHURCH. 



to ply the river until the completion of the 
Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad in 
1851. 

During the sessions of the state legislature 
in 1845-1846, resolutions were adopted uiging 
upon the Congress of the United States the 
advantages of the St. Joseph river as a nav- 
igable stream, and praying for an appropria- 
tion to improve the river in this respect. 
These lesolutions, however, were without ef- 
fect, and resulted in no action being taken by 
the government. 

At the river and harbor convention held in 
Chicago on July 5, 1S47, a number of dele- 



menced in constructing a dam and digging 
the race. The financial panic of that year 
compelled a cessation of operations and Mr. 
Coquillard entered suit for the recovery of his 
property. 

After several years of litigation the judgment 
of the courts was rendered in his favor and 
Mr. Coquillard, on gaining possession of the 
property proceeded to make extensive improve- 
ments on the race. Later the rights were 
purchased by Samuel L. Cottrell and others, 
and in 1867 the South Bend Hydraulic Com- 
pany, representing a capital of $100,000.00, 
obtained possession and in the spring of 186S 



22 



SOUTH BEND'. 



completed the race and executed leases to those 
who desired to use the water power for manu- 
facturing purposes. 

In December, 1842, the South Bend Manufac- 
turing Company obtained a charter from the 
legislature of the state and the following Feb- 
ruary the following officers of the corporation 
were elected Thomas W. Bray, president; 
George W. Matthews secretary; Abraham H. 
Harper, treasurer. In the spring of 1843 the 
construction of a dam across the river was 




RESIDENCE OF ANDHEW ANDERSON. 

commenced and also the race upon the east 
side, and the entire improvement was com- 
pleted the following year. 

The first to use the water power here were 
Abram R. Harper and John H. Harper, who 
erected a saw mill upon the race, and a second 
saw mill soon followed which was first used 
by William Stanfield. A manufactory of tubs 
and buckets was next erected, but this burned 
down shortly after its completion and was 
never rebuilt. Other factories were constructed 
in quick succession and both the east and 
west races were lined with thriving factories 
which today are in active and successful opera- 
tion. The South Bend Manufacturing Com- 
pany is still in existence and controls this great 
water power of the St. Joseph river. 

THE FUGITIVE SLAVE CASE. 

One of the most exciting and important 
events in the history of this city was the 
famous and historical fugitive slave case which 
was enacted here during the fall of 1849. From 
the records of this case it appears that a family 
of slaves had escaped from their master in 
Kentucky, and being pursued had taken refuge 
in the forests of Cass County, Michigan. They 



were finally captured by their owner, who put 
them in irons and started them on their 
journey to the South. Early one morning 
they reached South Bend and encamped near 
the village. 

The anti-slavery sentiment was strong at 
that time among the Eastern community which 
had largely settled here, and when they 
learned of the proximity of the party, the citi- 
zens at once formed a posse, and with the 
sheriff at their head, they intercepted the kid- 
napeis with a writ of habeaus corpus and at- 
tempted to compel the surrender of the slaves 
to the officers. The slave owners brandisheu 
their pistols and threatened to shoot, but the 
sheriff and his party were undismayed and the 
Kentuckians finally submitted and the case was 
brought before Judge Elisha Egbert for trial. 

Judge Edwin B. Crocker, was the attorney for 
the people, and Jonathan A. Liston, a brilliant 
young lawyer appeared for the slave owneis, 
and so unpopular did he become that soon after 
he was obliged to leave the country. The suit 
was decided in favor of the slave owners, but 
the people would not permit them to take their 
slaves away. Pistols were drawn in the court 
room, and finding the people resolute, they con- 
sented that the slaves should be removed . <i 
the jail for safe keeping. 

The excitement grew intense, and so strong 
was the feeling that the owners of the slaves 
abandoned their plans of taking the slaver- 
away and did not appear when the trial came 
on next day under another writ of habeas cor- 




OLD SIDER S MILL. 

pus obtained by citizens of Michigan who 
claimed that the prisoners were free men and 
not slaves. 

The captives were accordingly released and 
taken from the court house amid the cheers 
of the excited and triumphant populace. The 
owners of the slaves, however, carried the case 
to the supreme court to prove their claims and 
personally sued some of the parties who were 



SOUTH BEND. 



23 



most active in opposing them, to recover the 
value of their property. 

They obtained judgment for the prices they 
placed on the slaves, and the property of the 
defendants was sold to satisfy these claims, 
many being reduced to poverty by this action. 
Among those implicated in the case were Lean- 
der P. Newton, George W. Horton, Edwin B. 



of those interested are still living and are resi- 
dents of this city. 

THE PRESS. 

The history of the Press of South Bend is an 
interesting one, and almost from the first set- 
tlement of the village it was represented in the 
field of journalism by progressive men who 




ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH. 



Crocker, Solomon W. Palmer, David Jodon. 
William Wilmington, Lot Day, Jr., Amable M. 
Lapiere and Wright Mandlin. 

More than half a century has passed since 
this exciting event occurred, but many of the 
active participants in those scenes lived to sea 
the institution of slavery swept away and the 
equality of man sustained by law, while a few 



realized the need of the community for en- 
lightenment on current public affairs, and 
who were able advocates of the various politi- 
cal parties which have existed in the country. 
The first newspaper established in this 
city was the Northwestern Pioneer, which 
made its initial appearance in November, 1831, 
about one year after the county of St. Joseph 




X 



SOUTH BEND. 



25 



"was organized. At that time there was no 
paper published North of the Wabash river 
in Indiana, or in Southern Michigan. It was 
started in the interest of the Whig party, and 
was published by John D. and Joseph H. De- 
frees. It had but a short existence, and six 
months later it was changed to the St. Joseph 
Beacon, under which title it lived precariously 
for about eighteen months, as theie was not 
sufficient patronage in the county to maintain 
a newspaper. 

In 1836 the South Bend Free Press appeared, 
under the management of William Millikan, 
and it was regularly issued ior about nine 
years when it was discontinued, and the office 
and plant was purchased by Albert W. West 
and Schuyler Colfax. 

These two gentlemen established the St. 
Joseph Valley Register, and the first number 
was issued on September 12, 1845, with Mr. 
Colfax as its editor. It announced its politics 
as "inflexibly Whig," and proclaimed its posi- 
tion on the slavery question as follows: "We 
shall be fixedly opposed to enlarging the 
borders of slavery even one inch, either so far 
as sailor power and weight in the national 
councils are concerned, and shall hail with 
happiness the day when the Southern states, 
after calm examination, shall in a constitu- 
tional and legal manner adopt a feasible plan 
of emancipation, either gradual or immediate." 
Mr. West retired after a few months and Mr. 
Colfax became its sole proprietor. 

In 1865 the paper passed to the control of 
Archibald Beal who associated himself with 
C. E. Fuller. This partnership continued for 
two years, when Alfred B. Miller and Elmer 
Crockett, who were engaged on the paper, 
purchased the interest of Mr. Fuller, and the 
Aim became Beal, Miller & Co. In January, 
1872, Messrs. Miller and Crockett disposed of 
their interest, and the paper after several 
changes of ownership came into the hands of 
a joint stock company. In 1875 a daily and 
Sunday Register was published, which was 
continued until the paper went out of existence 
in the spring of 18S7, and its effects were ab- 
sorbed by the Tribune Printing Company in 
1889. 

The Free Democrat was established in 1S84 
to advocate the Free-Soil agitation and to sup- 
port the election of Martin Van Buren for 
president. It was owned by E. W. H. Ellis 
but had a precarious existence of but a few 
months. 

THE SOUTH BEND TIMES. 
The present successful Democratic journal 
known as the South Bend Times found its in- 



ception in 1S53 when A. E. Diapier & Son es- 
tablished the St. Joseph County Forum. 

The name was changed to the Times, and 
Mr. Henry Peed was in charge of the paper 
from 1881 to 1883. The "Times Printing 

Company" was formed in 1883 and Messis. J. 
B. Stoll, Charles A. McDonald, Sorden Lister 
and E. R. Wills were its directors. Mr. J. B. 
Stoll assumed control in the following April 
and has since been the leading spirit of this 
able journal. In January, 1901, a stock com- 
pany was organized which now controls the 
paper, and J. B. Stoll is the president of the 
company and the manager of the paper. The 
Times is a strong advocate of Democracy, is 
ably edited and has won deserved success. 

THE SOUTH BEND TRIBUNE. 

The South Bend Tribune was founded in 
1872 by the late Alfred B. Miller, Elmer 
Crockett, J. H. Banning, now of Irvington, 
Ind., and E. W. Hoover, of Chicago. All of 
these gentlemen had previously been interest- 
ed in the Register, but seeing the need of a 
new and progressive journal, and a first-class 
job printing office and bindery, they decided 
to carry their ideas into execution. 

The Tribune Printing Company was or- 
ganized March 1, 1872, with the following of- 
ficers: Alfred B. Miller, president; Elmer 
Crockett, vice-president, and E. W. Hoover, 
secretary. The first home of the paper was at 
No. 73 Washington street. The facilities of 
the office at that time consisted of a Taylor 
newspaper press, a Washington hand press, a 
Gordon job press, and a few other necessary 
but primitive adjuncts 
of a printing office 
while the power was 
furnished by a small 
steam engine. Mr. 
Miller as the editor, 
Mr. Crockett the fore- 
man of the printing de- 
partment, Mr. Hoover 
the bookkeeper, and 
Mr. Banning had charge 
of the mechanical de- 
partment. 

The present officers 
of the company are El- 
mer Crockett, president; 
P. A. Miller, vice- 
president and Charles E. Crockett, secretary- 
Today the Tribune owns one of the best 
equipped newspaper and job printing estab- 
lishments in the state. Type setting machines 
have been introduced, the most modern presses 




26 



SOUTH BEND. 



have been installed, including a Hoe Presto 
Web perfecting sterotype press, electrotyping 
machines and every device and machine de- 
manded by the most modern printing office of 
the country. The editorial force of the paper 
is composed of F. A. Miller, editor in chief, 
and R. H. Lyon, associate editor. 

The Mishawaka Branch of the Tribune was 
established in 1898 and is in charge of Mr. G. 
Albert Maurer, who has been connected with 
the paper for several years, and he is one of 
the most able and energetic newspaper men 
in this section of the state. Among the old 



city and the surounding country. It is under 
the personal management of the proprietors 
Gustave Fikenscher and Andrew Troeger, and 
both of these gentlemen are well known and 
enterprising newspaper men of high standing 
and ability. The Courier in addition to its 
list of local subscribers has quite an extensive 
circulation in Europe. 

THE GONIEC POLSKI. 

The Goniec Polski, or Polish Messenger, is an 
ably edited paper, which is a recognized power 
socially and politically among our citizens oi 




RESIDENCE OF MR. A. H. KELLEY. 



and valuable employees of the paper are H. 
W. Perkins, Thomas Freeman, E. W. Cutting, 
Henry Reamer and Hannah Drumm, who have 
been associated with it many years. Mr. 
Walter Derr has been connected with the 
business department for nearly nine years. 

THE SOUTH BEND COURIER. 

The South Bend Courier is an ably edited 
German paper and has been in successful op- 
eration since 1873. It is independent in poli- 
tics and has gained a wide circulation in the 



Polish nationality. It is a semi-weekly, six 
column folio, is independent in politics, and hat. 
been in successful existence several years In 
1S99 the Goniec Polski Publishing Company 
erected its present office and plant. Mr. 
George W. J. Kalczynski, editor and sole pro- 
prietor of the paper, is widely known here. He 
is an able writer, and his paper fills an im- 
portant place in South Bend journalsim. 

THE SOUTH BEND ERA. 
The South Bend Era. of which Hon. B. F. 
Shively was the editor and proprietor, marie 



SOUTH BEND 



its appearance on March 27, 1S80, as an advo- 
cate of the National Greenback Party. It was 
ably edited and met with fair success for a 
short time when it suspended. 

THE SUNDAY NEWS. 

The Sunday News has become one of the 
institutions of this great city, and was estab- 
lished by Chauncey N. Fa.ssett in 1887. The 
initial number was published April 24, 1887. 
and it has been successfully conducted since 
that time. It has a wide circulation and its 
columns are filled with all that is best and 
newest in the departments of news and liter- 



with few merchants and general stores, the 
need of some general institution for banking 
purposes was felt. The merchants were prac- 
tically the bankers of the community for sev- 
eral years. They received money on deposit, 
accepted produce in exchange for merchandise, 
loaned money to their customers and friends 
and furnished credit to the farmers of the sur- 
rounding country until they realized on their 
growing crops. In fact the only financial facili- 
ties of the village were those furnished by the 
storekeepers and a few private individuals who 
had small surplus funds to invest. 

In 1883, however, the South Bend branch of 




RESIDENCE OP MRS. PETER E. STUDEBAKER. 



ature. Mr. Fassett is one of the oldest journ- 
alists of South Bend. From a local writer in 
1875 on the Union he has been connected with 
the leading papers of the city, and distinguished 
himself as a writer of ability and a newspaper 
manager of executive force and energy. 



BANKS AND BANKING. 

THE STATE BANK OF INDIANA 
Almost from the inception of the village of 
South Bend, although but a small community 



the State Bank of Indiana, was established 
here, and the village soon enjoyed the advan- 
tage of a well regulated and conducted hanking 
institution. The State Bank was chartered 
by the legislature in June, 1834, with head- 
quarters in Indianapolis, and authority to es- 
tablish ten district branches throughout the 
state. 

Dr. John A. Hendricks and Hon. Thos. D. 
Baird, assisted by Hon. George Crawford, of 
Elkhart County, secured the location of a 
branch bank at South Bend, and on February 
22, 1838, a public meeting was held at the 
court house, and a dinner in honor of the event 



28 



SOUTH BEND. 



was given on the 24th at the Exchange Hotel, 
now the new Sheridan. Subscription books 
were opened on July 2, Alexander Coquillard. 
L. M. Taylor and John Grant, acting as com- 
missioners, and on the closing of the books on 
August 4, over 1,000 shares in excess of the re- 
quired amount had been subsciibed, and the 
state subsequently subscribed $S0.000.00 as its 
share of the stock. 

The bank was opened for business on Novem- 
ber 24, and was located in a two story brick 
building at the northeast corner of Michigan 
and Water (now Colfax avenue) streets. In 
1841 the bank building at the southwest corner 
of Michigan street and Colfax avenue was 
finished at a cost of about $11,000.00, and the 
bank was removed to its handsome and impos- 
ing new quarters. Horatio Chapin took up 
his residence in the rear of the bank building 
and remained theie until 1864. Among the 
presidents of the bank were Tyra W. Bray. 
John Egbert, L. M. Taylor. Anthony Defrees, 
J. L. Jernegan, Samuel C. Sample, and Rick- 
etson Burroughs. Marshall P. Chapin was 
elected teller in 1857 and settled up the af- 
fairs of the bank upon the expiration of its 
charter in 1S5S. 

THE BANK OF THE STATE OF INDIANA 

The necessity of continuing some adequate 
system of banking and maintaining a banking 
institution after the charter of the first bank 
expired was apparent to a large number of the 
people of this city, and a charter was obtained 
on March 3. 1855, for the Bank of the State of 
Indiana, to commence business when the old 
bank ceased to exist. 

The old bank building was purchased March 
17, 1857, and the new bank organized with a 
capital stock of $150,000.00. John Brownfield 
was president, Horatio Chapin, cashier, and 
John T. Lindsey, teller. The bank conducted 
business until 1864 when the United States 
Congress passed the National Banking law. 
which levied a tax of ten per cent on all notes 
issued by state banks. This was the death 
knell of the bank, and it finally liquidated its 
notes, wound up its business, and went out of 
existence. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

The First National Bank of South Bend was 
organized September 5, 1863, by Charles N. Cul- 
ver, Thomas S. Stanfield, Dr. John A. Henricks. 
Major Eathan S. Reynolds. John Reynolds and 
Ransom Hubbard. The capital stock was $100.- 
000.00, and the bank opened for business in tic 
old St. Joe block, the site of the present Oliver 
Hotel, where the palatial banking rooms of this 



institution are now located, on November 30, 
1863. Judge Stanfield was the first president 
and John Lindsey, cashier. The directors were 
Judge Stanfield, John Reynolds, Ethan S. Rey- 
nolds, Dr. John A. Henricks and Ransom 
Hubbard. 

In 1S67 Judge Stanfield resigned and William 
Miller, the late president of the South Bend 
National Bank, succeeded him. The same year 




OLD FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 

Air. Lindsey resigned as cashier and was suc- 
ceeded by Charles W. Guthrie. On January I, 
1869 Dr. Henricks was made president, and on 
January 13. 1871, Caleb A. Kimball, who had 
been with the bank since 1864. was made cash- 
ier, which office he still holds. The other pres- 
idents of the bank were: John R. Foster, and 
Judge Lucius Hubbard, who is now in charge. 
The vice-nresidents of the bank were A. u. 
dishing. Major E. S. Reynolds and Edward B. 
Reynolds, his son, who now occupies that office, 
having been elected July 29. L899 

In 1S65 the bank was burned out. in the fir^ 
which consumed tee old St. Joseph Block, bat 
its money and valuable papers were remo\ 
from the vaults and taken to the residence of 
Judge Stanfield. where they remained until t 1 
following day when a safer place of deposit 
was found. 

The bank then removed to the building of tin' 
old State Bank of Indiana, where it conducted 
business until June 10, 1900. when it removed 
to the Oliver Hotel building, where it is now 
located. 

THE SOUTH BEND NATIONAL BANK. 

The South Bend National Bank is the practi- 
cal outgrowth of the old State Bank of Indiana, 
which was organized in 1838, and it naturalL- 
became its successor when the old bank went 
out of existence. 

This bank was established as a national bank- 
ing institution in 1870 and its first president 



SOUTH BEND. 



29 



•was Mr. John Brownfield, who had previously 
been at the head of the old State Bank, and the 
incorporators and organizers of this bank were 
John Brownfield, William Miller, Lucius Hub- 
bard, Hon. Schuyler Colfax, William Mac!;, 
Powers Green. Darwin H. Baker, Benjamin F. 
Price and C. A. Kimball. 

The bank is located at No. 131 North Michi- 
gan street, and has conducted a most success- 
ful business. Mr. John Brownfield was the 
president of the bank until 1888. Mr. William 
Miller, who was president after Mr. Brownfield, 
and who died February 21, 1901. had been con- 
nected with the institution since its organiza- 
tion. The officers and directors of the bank are 
all active and responsible business men, and 
the bank is recognized as one of the leading 
financial institutions of the state. 

Mr. Marvin Campbell was elected on March 
5, 1901, as president of the bank to succeed Mr. 



institution of this character was necessary for 
the people of South Bend. The bank was in- 
corporated in 1869, and was opened for business 
in January 1870, in the rear of the store located 
at the northeast corner of Main and Washing- 
ton streets. During that year a one story brick 
building was erected at No. 108 North Main 
street, and in 1870 the deposits of the bank 
amounted to $7,267.98. 

The deposits of the bank have steadily in- 
creased until they are now nearly $2,000,000.00, 
and the number of depositors exceed 5,000, while 
nearly three quarters of a million dollars have 
been paid in interest. The bank has complete- 
ly remodelled its building on Main street, which 
is now one of the stateliest and most imposing 
structures in the city. The first president was 
Dr. Louis Humphreys, until his death, when "ae 
was succeeded by Mr. George W. Matthews, 
who died in 1895, and the present president is 




RESIDENCE OF THE LATE ALFRED B. MILLER. 



William Miller deceased, and Samuel R. Leeper 
was elected a director to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of his brother David R. Leeper. 
The officers of the bank are: Marvin Campbell, 
president; Lucius Hubbard, vice-president; 
Myron Campbell, cashier, and the directors are 
Haven Hubbard. Fred H. Badet, Samuel Leeper, 
DeWitt Sedgwick, and the officers of the bank. 

THE ST. JOSEPH COUNTY SAVINGS BANK. 

The St. Joseph County Savings Bank found its 
inception in the genius and energy of the lat? 
T. J. Seixas, assisted by some of the leading 
citizens of South Bend, who believed that an 



Jacob Woolverton. T. J. Seixas was the first 
cashier and served until 1878, when he was suc- 
ceeded by Lucius G. Tong, who now occupies 
that important office. In connection with this 
bank there has also been organized the St. 
Joseph Loan and Trust Company, which trans- 
acts an extensive trust business. 

CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK, 

The Citizens National Bank was incorporated 
in September, 1892, with a capital of $100,000.00. 
and is now in successful operation at the south- 
east corner of Michigan and Washington 
streets. The officers of the bank are G. W. 



30 



SOUTH BEND 



Lewis, president and C. Fassnacht, vice-oresi- 
dent. The bank also has a trust department 
connected with it. 

PEOPLES' SAVINGS BANK. 

The Peoples' Savings Bank was incorporated 
in 1S75, by Joseph B. Arnold. Jr., who was its 
first president, and a number oE others. Hiram 
Jackson, was secretary and Thaddeus H. Dunn, 
cashier. The trustees were Hiram Jackson, 
Newton Jackson. Aaron Webster, Henry B. 
Hine. George W. Swygart, Andrew J. Jaauith, 
J. B. Arnold, Sr., and J. B. Arnold, Jr. The 
bank transacted a successful business until 1SS5 
when it voluntarily closed out. paying its de- 
positors in full and retired from the banking 
field. 

RAILROAD FACILITIES. 

At a very early day the citizens of South 
Bend and St. Joseph County evinced a deep in- 
interest in the subject of obtaining railroad 
facilities for this section of the state, but in 
this, as in many other matters of public impor- 
tance, people of conservative and non-progres- 
sive ideas were found to voice their opposition 
to the project and to favor the construction of 
a canal which would be a less expensive under- 
taking. 

In February 1S35, however the State Legis- 
lature incorporated the Buffalo & Mississippi 
railroad, and under this act a company was or- 
ganized in 1S38 to construct a railroad through 
Indiana from the eastern line to Michigan City. 
Gen. Joseph Orr, of Laporte, was president of 
the company, and a survey was made from 




THE LIMITED EXPRESS. 

Michigan City to South Bend, and a contract 
let for grading the road from Michigan City to 
Laporte. the company, however, ran short of 
funds and the road was abandoned. 

It was not until 1847 that the discussion of 
the railroad question was again commenced, 
and in August a meeting was called at Misha- 
waka of all interested in a railroad from Tole- 



do to Chicago. Judge Stanfield presided at the 
meeting, and although great interest was man- 
ifested nothing definite resulted. About this 
time, however, some New York capitalists pur- 
chased the Michigan Southern road, running 
from Toledo. Ohio, and Monroe, Mich., to 
Hillsdale, Mich. 

Seeing an opportunity of accomplishing the 
desires of the residents of St. Joseph County, 
by uniting with this company, and inducing 
them to build the road in this direction, a prop- 
osition was made and accepted to build the road 







THE GRAND TRUNK BRIDGE. 

to the Indiana line on the east, provided a com- 
pany was organized whicn would build a line 
through the state to the Illinois line and thence 
to Chicago. The company was duly organized, 
but in 1850, the two companies were consoli- 
dated under the name of the Michigan Southern 
& Northern Indiana Railway Company. Con- 
tracts were let to build the road through North- 
ern Indiana to Laporte, and from Michigan 
City to Chicago, and also for making surveys 
for further extensions. 

It was afterward decided to abandon the 
charter of the Northern Indiana Company, and 
adopt that of the Buffalo & Mississippi Com- 
pany, and the road was constructed from La- 
porte to Chicago as it now runs. At the same 
time the Michigan Central road was being built 
upon an almost parallel line. Great rivalry 
was aroused between the two roads, but through 
the efforts of Judge Stanfield, opposition was 
overruled, a right of way was secured, and a 
line of railroad was obtained in this county 
without costing the people a dollar in money. 

The name of the road was retained until its 
consolidation with the Lake Shore road from 
Cleveland to Buffalo, when it took the name of 
the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railroad, 
as it is now known, and which is one of the 
leading roads in the country- 

The first through train from Lake Erie 
reached South Bend on Saturday evening, Octo- 
ber 4, 1851, and occasioned great excitement 
and enthusiasm. Bon fires were lighted, canons 
boomed and cheer after cheer went up from the 
great crowd assembled to celebrate this great 



SOUTH BEND. 



31 



event in the city's history. In 1867 a meeting 
was held at Jackson, Mich., to which the people 
along the St. Joseph Valley in Indiana were 
invited, to determine what propositions could 
be made to the Grand Trunk railroad of Can- 
ada, to extend its line from Ridgeway, Mich., 
through that state and Indiana to Chicago. 

At this meeting the Michigan Grand Trunk 
Railroad Company was organized, and a route 
was adopted, which if carried out, would cut 
off the city of South Bend and the entire St 
Joseph County. The result was that the com- 
pany failed to secure the necessary funds to 
build the proposed road, the route was changed 
and in 1869 it was leased to the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad Company, and the road was com- 
pleted to Niles. 

A company was then formed in South Bend 
called the St. Joseph Valley Railroad Company. 
South Bend subscribed $25,000.00 to the capital 
of the company in order to build the road. 



receiver, and about this time the road was com- 
pleted between Flint and Lansing, making a 
complete road to Valpairiso. In 1879 the Grand 
Trunk Railroad Company purchased the road, 
and the right of way to Chicago being secured, 
a through line from that city to Port Huron 
was formed, and on March 26, 1880 all the com ■ 
panies consolidated into the Chicago & Grand 
Trunk Railroad Company which now operates 
the road. 

Other railway facilities now possessed by the 
City of South Bend are those furnished by the 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railway, the Terre 
Haute & Indiana Railway, known as the Van- 
dalia Railway, the St. Joseph, South Bend & 
Southern Railway, and the Chicago & South 
Bend Railway, and the city is now furnished 
with a superior railway service which connects 
it with every section of the country, and its 
facilities are unsurpassed by any inland city on 
the continent. 




RESIDENCE OF HORATIO P. BLAIR. 



which was completed to this city in the spring 
of 1870, and is still operated as the Michigan 
Central Railroad. 

During this time the people of Michigan had 
undertaken to build a parallel line from Pore 
Huron to the Indiana line in the direction of 
South Bend, as the most feasible route to Chi- 
cago, and a company was organized in Indiana 
to build the road through the state by way of 
Mishawaka and South Bend and Valpairiso to 
the Illinois line. Under the several companies 
portions of the road were built, and after their 
consolidation the road was completed from Port 
Huron to Flint and from Lansing Mich., to Val- 
pairiso. Indiana. 

Owing to the financial panic the company 
was unable to meet its obligations and bonded 
indebtedness and was placed in the hands of a 



THE TELEGRAPH. 

Prior to 1847 South Bend had felt the urgent 
necessity of telegraphic communication with 
the outside world, and in April of that year, a 
representative of a proposed telegraph line, 
from Buffalo to Mishawaka, named J. J. Speed, 
visited the city, and submitted a proposition to 
run the line through the St. Joseph Valley, and 
establish an office at South Bend provided the 
citizens would subscribe to the stock of the 
company to the amount of $2,000. 

This amount was at once raised and the peo- 
ple indulged in the anticipation of enjoying 
telegraphic facilities in a short time. Chicago, 
however, refused to subscribe for its proportion 
of stock, and the work was delayed until 184S, 
when Chicago agreed to perform its share in 
the work. In June 1848, therefore, the line was 



32 



SOUTH BEND. 



fully completed, and South Bend tor the first 
time was in immediate communication, with the 
far distant cities of the continent. 

EDUCATIONAL. 

From 1S31 to 1S53 the district school houses, 
many of them built of logs and in most nrimi- 
tive style, were the Alma Maters of the grow- 
ing youth of this energetic city. As the years 
passed, however, increased facilities were 
adopted, and several private seminaries were 
opened and conducted by advanced instructors. 
The methods of teaching advanced year by year 
and the enrollment of scholars was annually 
larger, and in 1853 it was found to be a public 



were students in that revered hall of learning, 
which, however, gave way to the more modern 
and extensive building which is now known as 
the City High School. 

The Northern Indiana College was the first 
ambitious educational institution erected in this 
city. It was founded in 1S61 and was located at; 
the end of West Washington street. It wa3 
chartered by the General Assembly and was de- 
signed for the education of both male and female 
students. The first board of trustees was com- 
posed of Schuyler Colfax. William Miller. John 
H. Harper. John Brownfield, Asbury Clark. 
George F. Layton, Francis R. Tutt, John W. 
Chess and Elisha Egbert. From the outset the 




■V\T/1-|\^P - |ABLIC-LlI3I^ARy- 



necessity to form a free school system to meet 
the educational demands of the growing and 
intelligent community. It was not. however, 
until 1867 that the graded school system was 
adopted under Prof. Daniel Eyres, who was the 
superintendent at that time. 

The old Seminary building, which was the 
most commodious and pretentious school edi- 
fice which South Bend had known up to that 
time was erected about 1856. It was of brick 
and two stories in height, and was located on 
the site of the present High school building. 
It was the pride of the progressive citizens of 
South Bend, and many of the present success- 
ful and influential business men of this cit;' 



institution had serious financial difficulties to 
overcome, and it was not until the autumn of 
1S66 that the building was completed. It was 
built of brick, fifty feet by ninety feet, and four 
stories high, and the front was ornamented by 
a cylindrical tower one hundred feet high. The 
college was dedicated to the cause of Christian 
education on January 10, 1S67, but its lingering 
existence comprised only a few years, when for 
lack of funds it was obliged to close, and the 
building was afterward sold. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

The present High school building was erected 
in 1S72 and is one of the best equipped public 



SOUTH BEND. 



33 



educational institutions in the State. It is 
ninety feet front by one hundred and sixteen 
feed deep, with forty feet wings, and is four 
stories high with mansard roof. In this build- 
ing are arranged the class and study halls, a 
library, philosophical room, laboratory, society 
rooms, and a large main hall. The school sup- 
erintendent and his assistants also have their 
offices in the building. Large and commodious 
as it is it is becoming apparent that a larger 
and more extensive building will be necessary 
in the near future, and the members of the 
board and the progressive friends of education 
in the city are already agitating the erection of 
a larger and more extensive building in order 
to accommodate the increasing demands and 
the advancing studies of modern public educa- 
tion. 

Since the inauguration of the free school sys- 
tem nine new and handsome school buildings 



low, 1869 to 1870; W. K. Kidd, 1S70 to 1871; 
David A. Ewing. 1S71 to 1876; Alfred Kummer, 
1876 to 1S79; James Du Shane, 1879 to 1891, and 
Calvin Moon, since 1891. 

Among the principals of the High Schools 
who have so ably contributed to the scholastic 
advancement of the institution are Daniel Eyre, 
L. E. Denslow, W. K. Kidd, Benjamin Wilcox, 
James Du Shane, Alfred Kummer, Charles H. 
Bartlett. Eugene F. Lohr, Stuart McKibben, 
Mary L. Hinsdale, John M. Culver, and the 
present accomplished and progressive incum- 
bent of the office, Prof. Dumont Lotz, who has 
been in charge of the school since 1898. 

The splendid Public Library was erected by 
the city Board of Education and dedicated May 
8, 1896. 

In addition to the public schools of this city 
there are a number of Parochial Schools, con- 
ducted under he auspices of the Catholic 




Old Higfr School Bu.ld.ng. 



have been erected in various parts of the city. 
They are substantially built and supplied with 
every accessory for modern educational pur- 
noses. The schools are named as follows: 
Jefferson, erected in 1865; Madison, in 1893; 
Lafayette, in 1894; Laurel, in 1899; Coquillard, 
in 1891; Elder, in 1896; Jn-anklin, in 1889, Col- 
fax, in 1898, and Linden in 1890. A number of 
additions and extensions have been made to 
many of these buildings after their erection, 
and the total expenditure of the city for school 
buildings and equipments has been about $500,- 
000.00. 

The following school superintendents have 
had charge of the educational institutions of 
this city: Daniel Eyre, 1867 to 1869; L. E. Dens- 



Church. Among these institutions are the 
schools connected with St. Patrick's Church, 
St. Mary's Church, St. Joseph's Church, St. 
Hedwige's Church, and the number of scholars 
in daily attendance is estimated at about 3,000. 
In these schools, languages and the higher 
branches are taught, in addition to the regular 
religious studies prescribed by the church, and 
all departments are in the hands of able in- 
structors. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
The Public Library of South Bend has be- 
come one of the great intellectual institutions 
of the city. Its handsome building and well 
selected lists of books attest the progressive 
intelligence of the community, and the public 




< 



Jz; 






SOUTH BEND. 



35 



spirit which has found substantial expression 
in this beautiful and enduring form. 

This great educational medium found its 
inception in the hearts and minds of a few 
public spirited men of this city foremost 
among whom were Dr. Louis Humphreys, W. 
G. George and John Klingel. These gentlemen 
with a number of others formed the nucleus 
of the present library by personal contributions 
of books and money, and the first library was 
practically established in 1872 in a rear room of 
a store on Michigan street. 

This primitive institution at once became 
popular and very soon these limited quarters 
became too small for the needs of the aspiring 
library, and it was removed to Mr. Alfred 
Klingel's store on Washington street. Here a 
disastrous lire occurred in which the books of 
the library were burned and destroyed, and 
the library suffered a severe loss which prac- 
tically ended its existence. 

Shortly after this Mr. James DuShane became 
interested in the library, and circulated a peti- 
tion to the legislature which received the signa- 
tures of influential citizens representing over 
three millions and a half dollars of taxable 
property, requesting authority to establish a 
free public library, the maintenance of which 
was to be paid out of the tax income of the 
city in a proportion to be named by the legisla- 
ture. 

Other prominent citizens took similar action, 
and in 1881 the legislature of the state passed 
an act authorizing cities of 10,000 inhabitants 
and over to establish such libraries through 
their local boards of education, and in 1883 the 
orovisions of this act were extended to all 
cities and unincorporated towns. Mr. DuShane 
was an earnest advocate and promoter of this 
legislation and was most energetic in his 
efforts to induce the Board of Education of 
South Bend to act in the matter, but it was not 
until 1888 that the public library of South 
Bend was established and the initial steps taken 
to insure its permanency. 

The members of the school board at that 
time were Dr. C. A. Daugherty. B. F. Dunn and 
Joseph E. Williams, and though they decided 
to establish the library, it had at the time 
neither books, room or money. It was impossi- 
ble to realize any funds from the tax levy until 
the following year, and those interested in the 
measure were in a quandary. 

At this point Mr. James Oliver became in- 
terested in the projected library, and he at once 
fitted up a large room on the fourth floor of the 
Opera House building, and advanced the money, 
in anticipation of the tax levy, which was 
deemed necessary to purchase the first install- 
ment of books and periodicals. Donations 



were made by a number of citizens among whom 
were Hon. Clem Studebaker, Mr. Leighton Pine 
of the Singer Manufacturing Company, who 
furnished the chairs of the library, and others 
who contributed articles of value. Thus through 
the assistance of friends the library was estab- 
lished with something over 1,000 books and a 
full selection of current periodicals and 
literature. 

In 1895 the library was sadly in need of 
increased accommodations and the Board Di' 
Education, which then consisted of Dr. C. A. 
Daugherty, Albert Listen'berger and Henry P. 
Elbel, purchased a lot of ground on the south- 
east corner of Main and Wayne streets, and 
took the necessary steps toward the erection of 
a library building which would be an archi- 
tectural ornament to the city, and a structure 
that would meet all present demands, and 
anticipate the needs of the city for years to 
come. The foundations of the library were 
laid in June. 1895, and the present magnificent 
structure was completed on May 1, 1896, and 
the building and grounds cost about $40,000, 
and is one of the most striking structures in 
the city. It is provided with lecture halls and 
society rooms, and at present the entire upper 
floor is occupied by the Historical Society of 
South Ber.d. 

RELIGIOUS. 

Prior to January, 1831, there was no place of 
public worship in the entire county of St. 
Joseph. 

METHODIST. 

On January 30, 1831, the first religious exer- 
cises were held in this city under the auspices 
of the Methodist denomination, and were pre- 
sided over by the Rev. N. B. Griffith, who was 
the first clergyman to come to this city. 
Prior to this, however, 
a few Catholic priests 
had labored here, and 
years before Fathers 
Badin and DeSeille had 
established a mission 
at Notre Dame. 

In 1835 a primitive 
church was built. T*p 
to this time the little 
congregation had met 
in the old log school 
house and in private 
houses. In 1836 a frame 
church was occupied, 
and in 1850 a brick 
church was erected 
at the corner of Main 
and Jefferson streets. 
This building was 




:;.; 



SOUTH BEND. 



originally 18x70 feet, and in 1869 the build- 
ing was enlarged and remodeled. This was 
tne inception of the present First Methodist 
Church, now the leading congregation of the 
Methodists in this city. 

The Michigan Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church was organized in 1869 with 137 mem- 
bers, and Rev. William R. Mikels was appointed 
its first pastor. 

The German M. E. Church was organized in 
1872 by Rev. Philip Walker, of Michigan City, 
and its first pastor was Rev. William Keller. 
In 1881 a lot was purchased at the northwest 
corner of Lafayette and Wayne streets and the 



first chapel was built by Mrs. Clem Studebaker 
in 1883 and cost $10,00.00. The present pastor 
is Rev J. G. Campbell. 

The other Methodist Episcopal churches in 
this city are Grace Church, Rev. Delos M. 
Wood, pastor; Free Methodist Church. Rev. C. 
E. Edinger. pastor: Lowell Heights M. E. 
Church. Rev. W. E. Lowther. pastor; A. M. E. 
Church. Rev. W. M. Simpson, pastor, and 
River Park M. E. Church, Rev. W. E. Lowther. 
pastor. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 
The First Presbyterian Church had its incep- 




FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



old church building was removed to this loca- 
tion. In 1890 about 100 members of the Ger- 
man Evangelical Church, joined this congrega- 
tion, and shortly afterward ftie present brick 
church was erected. It has now about 150 
members and the present pastor is Rev. Karl 
Keck. 

The Milburn Memorial Church, to be erected 
in memory of Mr. George Milburn, the father 
of Mr. Clem Studebak"er, will stand at the corner 
of Laporte and Colfax avenues, and when 
finished will be one of the handsomest and 
most tasteful church edifices in the city. The 



tion in 1S31 when Horatio Chapin and William 
Stanfield organized the first Sunday school in a 
log school house. For a time it languished 
but in 1834 it was again organized in the rear 
of Mr. Chapin's store and was conducted 
there for a few months. In 1835 the Rev. 
Albert Bryant came to South Bend, and a small 
congregation was formed and services were held 
in the rooms of Mr. Bryant over Mr. Chapin s 
store. The first church building was erected at 
the corner of Lafayette and Water streets, in 
1836, the pulpit and benches being made by the 
nastor. The church in 1S39 removed to Main 



SOUTH BEND. 



37 



street, south of Washington street, and at one 
time Schuyler Colfax was a member of the 
church. 

A new church building was erected at the 
southwest corner of Lafayette and Washington 
streets in 1S66. and the present handsome and 
imposing edifice was finished and dedicated 
June 23, 1889. Rev. George T. Keller, who was 
most active in the building of the new church. 
died May 24, 1888, before its completion, and 
the first pastor of the new church was Rev. 
Henry Webb Johnson, D. D., who is still the 
ministerial leader of this large and influential 
congregation. 

The other Presbyterian churches in South 
Bend are the Westminster Church, Rev. Warren 
Eugene Shirey, pastor, and Trinity Presby- 
terian, Rev. I. M. Houser, pastor. 

REFORMED CHURCH. 

The Reformed Church of South Bend was 
organized in 1849 by the Rev. David McNiesh, 
and was connected with the General Synod of 
the Reformed Church of America. The brick 
church at the southwest corner of Lafayette 
street and Colfax avenue was erected during 
that year. The church was reorganized in 
1870 and Rev. N. D. Williamson was for many 
years its pastor. The late Hon. Schuyler Colfa:< 
was for a long time a member of this church. 

EPISCOPAL. 

St. James' Church, located on Lafayette 
street between Washington street and Colfax 
avenue, was first organized as a parish July 
28, 1868, with the Rev. George P. Schetky. D. D.. 
as rector. The first church building was 
erected in 1869 and dedicated with appropriate 
services September 5. In January. 1871, the 
church was moved to the northwest corner of 
Lafayette and Jefferson streets. This building 
and lot was sold in 1898 and the present site 
on Lafayette street was purchased. A new 
and handsome church was erected in 1894 and 
dedicated by Rt. Rev. Bishop of Springfield, 
George Franklin Seymour, S. T. D., on Christ- 
mas eve, Dec. 24. at a midnight service. The 
property is valued at $33,000. The present 
rector, the Rev. Francis Milton Banfil, B. A. 
was instituted January 1, 1899, and the com- 
municants now number 208 in good standing. 

BAPTIST. 

The first Baptist Church was organized Sep 
tember 14, 1836, with Rev. James M. Johnson, 
as pastor. The present handsome and imposing 
church edifice is located at the northwest 
corner of Main and Wayne streets. 

The other Baptist church are Mt Zion Baptist 
Church, Re\. F. P. Green, pastor; German Bap- 



tist Church. Dunkards, Rev G. D. Zollers, pas- 
tor; First Swedish Baptist Church, Rev. Gust. 
Carlson, pastor. 

CHRISTIAN. 

The first Christian Church of this city was 
organized in 1844 on the eastern side of Portage 
Prairie, and with but twelve members. Te Rev. 
W. Mcllvaine was the first pastor. In 1851 the 
congregation secured the use of the old 
seminary building on Washington street in 
which they worshiped until the spring of 1852 
when a church was erected and dedicated on 
Main street, between Jefferson and Wayne 
streets. In 187S a larger building was erected 
mi the same site, and later this was materially 
enlarged and remodeled. The congregation is 
a large one, and the services are well attended. 
The present pastor is Rev. P. J. Rice. 

EVANGELICAL. 

The congregation of St. Peter's Evangelical 
Church was organized in 1863, and its present 




st. Joseph's cnoRcn. 
handsome brick church is located on West 
Water street. The present pastor is Rev. O. 
Koenig. 

The other Evangelical church in South Bend 
are Mizpah Church of the Evangelical Associa- 
tion, Rev. Lorenzo S. Fisher; St. Paul's 
Evangelical, Rev. E. J. Nitsche, pastor, and 



38 



SOUTH BEND. 



Zion Evangelical Church. Rev. M. Goffeney, 
pastor. 

St. Paul's Lutheran Church is located on West 
Jefferson street and has a large and active 
membership. A flourishing school is also 
connected with this church. The Rev. Trangott 
Thieme is the pastor. 

CATHOLIC. 

The Catholic Church had an early organiza- 
tion in South Bend, and was among the first 
to conduct religious services in this city. 
Father Corby of Notre Dame, was the first 



St. Joseph's Church, on North Hill street, 
Father Nicholas J. Stoffel, pastor. 

The Heart of Jesus Church, on Thomas street, 
Father H. F. Paanakker, pastor. 

St. Kazimier Church on Webster street. 

St. Stanislaus Church on West Lincoln 
street, and St. Peter's Church. 

OTHER CHURCHES. 

The other prominent churches are Holv 
Trinity. Lutheran; Swedish Lutheran. Rev. N. 
J. Forsberg, pastor; Swedish Lutheran Mission, 
Rev. C. G. Youngren, pastor; Brethren Church, 



jlu^ 




THE ST. JOSEPH COUNTY COUKT HOUSE. 



resident pastor of the church in this city. At 
present there are eight Catholic churches in 
South Bend, all of them largely attended, anil 
in a flourishing condition. These churches 
also have parochial schools established in 
connection with the church. The following are 
the churches in this city: 

St. Patrick's Church on South Taylor street, 
Father John Francis DeGroote, C. S. C, pastor. 

St. Hedwige's, on South Scott street. Father 
Valentine Czyzewski, C. S. C, pastor. 

St. Mary's German Catholic. South Taylor 
street, Father Peter Johannes. C. S. C. pastor. 



Rev. Ell wood Braker, pastor; Central Congre- 
gational Church, and First Church of Christ, 
Scientist. 

The Dunkards, or German Baptists, also have 
a large following in this vicinity, and its 
members are among the most substantial people 
in this community. The old Wenger church is 
one of the early landmarks of this city and 
Elder H W. Krieghbaum is the beloved pastor 
of the congregation in South Bend. 

The Young Men's Christian Association was 
organized in 1871, but after a few years of fail- 
ing interest was inactive for some time, when 



SOUTH BEND. 



39 



it was reorganized on a stronger basis by Dr. 
L. W. Mnnhall, State Secretary of the Associa- 
tion, and it has prospered ever since. The 
present officers of the Association are: W. 0. 
Davies, president; George T. Hodson, vice-pres- 
ident; Myron Campbell, treasurer, and H. A. 
Pershing, secretary. The directors are the 
officers of the association and Elmer Crockett. 
R. R. Peck, F. H. Badet, J. H. Dunn, Madison 
Miller. W. H. Mack, E. T. Howard and Cadmus 
Crabill. Miller Guy is the general secretary. 

HOSPITALS. 

The Epworth Hospital, whose handsome 
new building, now fast approaching comple- 
tion, is located at the northeast corner of 
Main and Navarre streets, found its incep- 
tion in 1892. It was originally intended as a 
home for unfortunates, and was in charge of 
the Woman's Home Missionary societies of 
the Methodist chinch and the Dorcas society 
of Milburn Chapel. Since that time it has 




THE Ol-I) COURT HOUSE. 

grown to its present large dimensions and 
last year 225 patients were treated at the hos- 
pital. The new building will cost $40,000 to 
erect and will be one of the best constructed 
hospital buildings in the state. The lady man- 
agers of the hospital are president. Mrs. 
George M. Studebaker; vice-piesidents, Mrs. 
Isaac Dale, Mrs. Alexander Lippman, Mrs. D. 
H. Baker, Mrs. Maggie Stall and Mrs. C. H. 
Myers; recording secretary. Mrs. C. M. 
Haeske; treasurer, Mrs. John Roth; finance 
committee, chairman Mrs. C. A. Carlisle, Mrs. 
Clark Skinner, Mrs. C. A. Daugherty and Mrs. 
Penrod. The male directors of the institution 
consist of the following well known gentle- 
men; President, Marvin H. Campbell; vice- 
p.esident, William R. Boyd; secretary, John 



Roth, and treasurer, George O. Ware. Direc- 
tors, Clem Studebaker, John C. Paxson, M. V. 
Beiger, E. B. Reynolds and Lucius Hubbard. 

Another most excellently conducted hospital 
is the St. Joseph located at Notre Dame 
avenue. For years this excellent institution 
has been in successful operation under the 
auspices and management of the Sisters of 
the Catholic Church of this city, and thous- 
ands of patients have been cared lor by this 
noble hospital. 

THE BENCH AND BAR. 

When St. Joseph County was first legally 
organized it was made part of the First 
Judicial district of the state. In 1833, how- 
ever, the districts we.e reorganized, and it 
was made a part of the Eighth district. This 
continued until 1837, when it was attached to 
the Ninth Judicial circuit. This arrangement 
continued until 1837, when the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas was abolished, and the judicial 
districts were made smaller and largely in- 
creased in number. Under this law St. Joseph 
and Lapoite Counties composed die Thirty- 
Second Judicial district. This district was 
continued until 1897, when the general as- 
sembly again divided the district. Laporte 
County remaining the Thirty-Second district, 
and St. Joseph County forming a new judicial 
district to be known as the Sixtieth. 

The first court house was erected in 1832- 
1833, and was located at the northeast corner 
of the public square. It costs *rf,0U0. Five 
years later a one story addition was erected. 
The old court house with the clock tower was 
first pianned in 1853, erected in 1854, and fin- 
ished and occupied for public use in 1855. It 
was buiit at a cost of $35,000, and was re- 
garded as a most imposing temple of justice 
at that time. In 1870 extensive repairs and 
additions we:e made to the building, which 
cost about $15,000. This building stood upon 
the site of the present handsome court house, 
and was removed to its present location on 
Lafayette street. 

The first jail was built of logs and was 
constructed in 1832, and an additional story 
was erected in 1835. A new jail was erected 
in 1860, but later was found to be inadequate 
to the demands made upon it, and in 1S97 
the present jail was erected at a cost of 
$40,000. The building is a substantia: struc- 
ture, three stories in height, and has cell 
arrangements for the accommodation of ninety 
six prisoners. In the jail there are also pro- 
visions made for a nospital, and insane ward, 
and a boys', women's and girls' department, 
which insures a perfect separation of the 



40 



SOUTH BEND 



various classes of criminals. The present 
sheriff is Charles E. McCarty, and u. Harley 
McCarty is deputy sheriff. 

THE FIRST COURT. 

The first session of the Circuit Court was 
held in South Bend on October 22. 1S32. in the 
tavern of Calvin Lilley. and Judge John R. 
Porter presided. Judge Gustavus A. Everts 



eighteen years, and Walter A. Funk, who is 
now the honored judicial head of the St. 
Joseph Circuit, having been eiecteci in Novem- 
ber. 1900. 

From the organization of the county until 
L852, the Circuit Coir, t was composed of a 
presiding judge and two associate judges. 
The following able gentlemen uiled that im- 
portant office during the period mentioned: 




THE NEW Post OFFICE. 



presided at the second term of court, held in 
June. 1833. 

Among those who have worn the judicial 
ermine and presided over the district, of 
which St. Joseph County formed a part, are 
judges, John R. Poiter. Samuel C. Sample. 
Ebenezer M. Chamberlain, Thomas o. Stan- 
tiild. Albert G. Deavitt, John B. Niles, Andrew 
L. Osborne. Daniel Noyes, who served ror 



John Banker. Chapel \V. Brown. William C. 
McCartney, John Ireland. Reynolds Dunn, 
Powers Green. Peter Johnson, and John D. 
Robertson. 

Among the older members of the p.esent 
bar may be mentioned Hon. Andrew Ander- 
son. Jonathan P. Creed. Jonn E. Fisher and 
Hon. George ford, while- the younger members 
nl the legal fraternity are all progiessive and 



SOUTH BEND 



41 



able attorneys who have conscientiously con- 
tributed toward establishing the present high 
standard of legal ethics and practice of the 
courts of the St. Joseph Circuit. 

PROBATE COUR'l. 

Probate Courts were establisned by the 
state constitution in 1816, and ue hist judge 
commissioned for this court was Hon. James 
P. Antrim., who served until 183^. He was 
succeeded in turn by Hons. Elisha Egbert, 
John J. Deming, Edward F. Dibble and Elisha 
Egbert again, who continueu in office until 
the court was abolished in 1852. 

COMMON PLEAS COURT. 

The Common Pleas Court was created by 
the legislature in 1852. and was given original 
and conclusive jurisdiction in all matters le- 
lating to the probate of wills, granting of let- 
ters testimentary of administration, and 
guai dianship. and all other matters hereto- 
fore pertaining to the Probate Court whi< h 
was abolished. This court also had concur- 




UESIDENCE UV Mil. PRANK C. IUtl'1'. 

rent jurisdiction with the Circuit Court in all 
criminal cases, where the penalty was less 
than the penitentiary. 

Judge Elisha Egbert was the first judge of 
this court, elected in 1853, and served until 
his death, November 1870. rlis successors 
weie Hon. Edward J. Wood, and Hon. Daniel 
Noyes. the latter ot whom was legislated out 
of office by the abolishment of the court. 

THE NEW COURT HOUSE. 
On October 29, 1898, the new and handsome 
building, designed as the St. Joseph County 



court house was completed. The building was 
erected at a cost of $240,000, and is of fire 
proof construction, surmounteu by a dome 
forty feet in diameter, and fifty-six feet in 
height. 

This imposing edifice dedicated to the cause 
of justice is an ornament to the city, an honor 
to all connected with its construction, and has 
no superior in the state of Indiana. The ad- 
visory committee which acted on the part of 
the people, and in conjunction with the County 
Commissioners in the erection of this impos- 
ing building, was composed of Hon. Clement 
Studebaker. Joseph D. Oliver, John B. Stoll, 
Elmer Crockett and P. O'Brien. 

THE ST. JOSEPH BAR ASSOCIATION. 

This association was formed on Uctober S. 
1S73, and its first officers were Alvin S. Dun- 
bar, president; Lucius Hubbard, secretary, and 
A. S. Dunbar. Andrew Anderson, William G. 
George, H. E. Huriburt, Joseph Henderson, 
Joseph B. Arnold, Jr.. and Lucius Hubbard, 
directois. 

The first object of the association was to 
secure a law nbraiy of an extensive character, 
for the use of its mem iters and it succeeded 
in securing a valuable collection through the 
earnest support of its meni tiers. 

Among the honorary members ot the asso- 
< iation were: Hon. Daniel Noyes, William S. 
Haymond, William H. Calkins, Joseph E. 
McDonald. Schuyler Coltax. u. P. Morton. D. 
D. Pratt, and a number of otber prominent 
attorneys of the state. 

The association maintained its existence 
until 1892. when the interest in its operations 
seemed to wane, and it was finally dissolved. 

NEW ASSOCIATION. 
In December, 1900, a new association was 
organized under the same name, and its pres- 
ent membership is sixty-one attorneys prac- 
ticing at the local bar. with Judge Walter A. 
Funk, the county and deputy county clerk as 
honora.y members. The officers ot the new 
association are Wilbert Warn, president; 
Francis M. Jackson, vice-president; Robert D. 
Gardner, secretary, and Francis E. Lambert, 
treasui er. 

THE POST OFFICE. 

The present beautiful post office building is 
in striking contrast with the limited quarters 
and postal facilities ot early days, and is a 
substantial indication of the growth and ex- 
pansion and development of this city from a 
primitive village in the wilderness to the pres- 
ent enterprising and important industiial 
center of Northern Indiana. 



42 



SOUTH BEND. 



The first postmaster was Lathrop M. Taylor, 
his commission heing dated June 6, 1829. 
This city was then designated by the postal 
authorities at Washington as "Southold." 

On October 18, 1830, Postmaster General 
Bany of the United States changed the name 
from "Southold" to South Bend, and on Feb- 
ruary 15, 1831, Col. L. M. Taylor was duly 
commissioned postmaster of South Bend. The 
present building was finished and opened for 
business on March 28, 1898, and on April 1, 
1898, Horace G. Miller, the present postmaster 
assumed the duties of that important position. 



country, which was inaugurated May 15, 1899, 
has already proven a most satisfactory addi- 
tion to the postal service and win be greatly 
extended. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Prior to the year 1853 South Bend had no fire 
department or organized system of protection 
in case of fire, and the first organized effort in 
that direction was made during this year, when 
the "St. Joseph Company, No. 1" was organized, 
and a small hand engine was purchased for 
its use. 




From ■• La Salle in the Valley ol the St. Joseph. 1 
OLD PORTAGE LANDING ON THE ST. JOE. 



The following prominent citizens have held 
the office of postmaster since the creation of 
the office: L. M. Taylor, Dr. George Rex, 
Jeremy Banning, John Harper, John K. 
Wright. Ralph Staples, J. N. Massey, E. B. 
Farnam, Col. A. B. Wade, George Pfleger, 
Sorden Lister, Elmer Ciockett, Walter Harri- 
gan and Horace G. Miller. 

In every respect South Bend enjoys all the 
postal advantages of the most prominent city 
in the country, and the rural mail delivery 
system to the residents of the surrounding 



Anothei company was soon after organized 
and in 1857 "Union Hose Company No. 3" was 
formed and another engine added to the depart- 
ment. In 1865 a steam fire engine was pur- 
chased, which was called the "Young Hoosier." 

In the fall of 1885 the present municipal fire 
department was organized by the City Council, 
and since that time has been maintained and 
been under control of the city government. 

The present fire department of the city is 
composed of forty-two men, including the 
chief and his assistant, and there is in activa 



SOUTH BEND, 



43 



service six hose wagons, one chemical engine 
and one hook and ladder reserve, with one hose 
cait and a hook and ladder truck in reserve, 
and each company is supplied with 2,000 feet 
of hose. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Prior to the incorporation oE the City of South 
Bend in 1865, the marshal was the principal 
peace officer of the town. In 1S65 the police 
force of this city consisted of Daniel Roof, who 
was the first marshal of the municipality and 
one assistant. His successors in the marshal's 
office and who were elected by the people, were 
Jacob K. Huston, 1S66; W. Carlton, 1867; 
George W. Foulke, 1868 to 1871 ; J. A. Hartmau, 
1872; William Crews, 1873; Robert Hardy, 
1874-5; George Bernhard, 1876-7; and 18S0 to 
1883; E. C. Johnson, 1878-9; Thomas Hoban, 
1884-6. 

The police department came under the 
operation of the Metropolitan law in 189'!. 
Major Wilber E. Gorsuch is the present Super- 




ST. CASIMIK S CHURCH. 

intendent of Police, and is a most able officer. 
The force consists of twenty-six men and two 
sergeants of police, A. P. Klingel and Oliver 
Williams. There are twenty-six public alarm 
boxes connected with the department, and 
seven private alarms located in the various 
public buildings and in a few private residences. 
The department also has an excellent ambulance 
service, and a patrol wagon is a part of the 
general equipment. 

Both Police and Fire Departments are now 
under the control of the Board of Public Safety. 

THE WATER WORKS. 

The question of providing a proper and 
adequate supply of water for the city had long 



been considered, but in 1872 the citizens began 
to seriously and energetically agitate the sub- 
ject. A water works committee was appointed, 
and although a number favored what was 
known as the Holly system, a majority believed 
the stand-pipe system would prove the best 
for the city, and this plan was adopted. 

On Monday, November 17, 1873, the iron stand- 
pipe was erected in its present position under the 
direction of Alexander Staples of this city, ana 
was an engineering feat noted throughout the 
country and abroad. With a single exception 
this is the highest stand-pipe in the world. 
The first test of the works was made Christmas 
day. 1873 and proved entirely satisfactory. 

Until 1875 the works were under the control 
of the city council, afterward they were man- 
aged by a Board of Trustees, but now they are 
under the control of a Board of Public Works 
appointed by the Mayor. In 1895 the works 
and pumping station on Michigan street, near 
the river, were erected, and the city's supply of 
water materially increased. The supply is 
drawn from sixty-two artesian wells, all of 
which are available and flowing constantly. 
Thirty-two wells are located at the Central 
Pumping Station, and thirty at the North 
Pumping Station. 

There is a reservoir of 320,000 gallons 
capacity connected with the works, and a 
cistern, holding 14,000 gallons, which is sup- 
plied with water from the St. Joseph river, and 
there are over fifty miles of distributing 
mains, all of which were constructed at an esti- 
mated expenditure of $380,000. 

A number of extensions are already in con- 
templation and several miles of piping will be 
added to the system during the coming year. 
M. S. Rogers, the able superintendent of the 
water works, has filled that responsible position 
since 1898. 

SOUTH BEND FUEL AND GAS COMPANY. 

The South Bend Fuel and Gas Company 
was organized by local capital and by prom- 
inent business men of this city. The first 
meeting to form the company was held Jan- 
uary 7, 1868, and articles ot incorporation 
were seemed during that year. 

The first works were erected during the 
year and in December the gas was turned on 
and supplied to 74 consumers at $4.00 per 
1,000 feet net. At that time coal gas alone 
was manufactured. To-day both coal and 
water gas is produced at the works and the 
piesent capacity is about 600,000 feet per day, 
while the illuminating quality of the gas has 
been increased from 16 candle power per five 
feet, to 23 candle power, and the price has 
been reduced from $4.00 to $1.00 and $1.20 




RESIDENCE OF MR. JAMES OLIVER. 



SOUTH BEND 



45 



per 1,000 feet. The works have been en- 
larged and modernized and now it is one of 
the best equipped gas plants in the country- 

The company has now in operation thirty- 
five miles of piping, while extensive additions 
are contemplated during 1901, among which is 
a line to Mishawaka, which will furnish gas to 
the people of that city and to all the inter- 
vening territory. 

The present officers of the company are: 
President, Clem Studebaker, who has held the 
office almost since its organization; vice-pres- 
ident, J. M. Studebaker; secretary, Chailes 
Arthur Carlisle; treasurer, George M. Stude- 
baker. Mr. B. W. Perkins, the superintendent 
of the company, has neld that responsible 
position since 1881 and dunng his connection 
with the company most of the improvements 
and additions have been made to the works 
and the service. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTING. 

Among the progressive advantages pos- 
sessed by the city is an extensive and per- 
fectly equipped electric lighting system. The 
South Bend Electric Company was incorpor- 
ated in 1882 by Judge Thomas S. Stanfleld, 
who was the first president of the company; 
Andrew Anderson, who acted as treasurer; 
James DuShane, who was the secretary of the 
company, L. P. Barth and Charles Patch. The 
original capital of the company was $18,000. 
but it has since been increased to $150,000. 
The original capacity of the plant was a ten 
arc light machine. This was soon followed 
by a fifteen light machine and then by one of 
the capacity of fifty lights. The first install- 
ment was in a rear room of the old red mill 
known as the "Salamander," located on the 
west race and was supplied by water power. 
Soon after the organization of the company 
H. A. and Charles A. Chapin became interest- 
ed in the enterprise, a bricK building was 
erected and steam power used. The com- 
pany, however, steadily increased its service 
until this building became too small and the 
present splendid new plant was erected on the 
east side of the river at a cost of $40,000. 
William J. Hunker was elected superintendent 
in July, 1899, and in November of tnat year 
succeeded M. DuShane as secretary, who had 
held the office since the organization of the 
company. 

The present officers of the company are 
Charles A. Chapin, president, and Marshall 
Chapin, treasurer. The office of the company 
is located in the Nippold building and it also 
does a large wiring and supply business. 



SOUTH BEND IN THE REBELLION. 

During the war of the rebellion, those event- 
ful years from 1861 to 1865, when American 
loyalty received its greatest test anu glor- 
iously triumphed. South Bend bore an honor- 
able and important part. Hundreds of her 
citizens gave up their lives on Southern battle 
fields, and many rose to honor and distinc- 
tion in that historic struggle. 

The first company was organized April 19. 
1861, with Andrew Anderson as Captain, and 
it became Co. I, of the Ninth Indiana Volun- 
teers, enlisted for three months' service. The 
regiment was mustered in at Indianapolis 
Apiil 25, with Robert H. Milroy as Colonel, 
and was the first to leave the state for the 
war, leaving Indianapolis May 29. and report- 
ing at Grafton, W. Va.. June 1. The regiment 
participated in all the engagements of Gen. 
Morris' brigade, at Phillipi, Laurel Hill and 
Garrick's Ford, and returned at the close of 
its term of service with a fine record. 

The Ninth regiment was reorganized Sep- 
tember 5, at Laporte, for a three years' cam- 
paign and many, of the memDe:s of Company I 
reinlisted and served during the war. South 
Bend was also represented in Company B of 
the Fifteenth regiment. 

The 29th regiment was largely recruited 
from St. Joseph County and was commanded 
by Col. John F. Miller. Henry J. Blowney was 
major: Rev. Joseph C. Reed was chaplain and 
Dr. Louis Humphreys was surgeon, while the 
assistant surgeons were Drs. John 1V1. Stover 
and J. R. Brown. 

Three companies of the 48th regiment were 
recruited from this county. William H. Sut- 
phen was captain of Co. B, Thomas B. Rob- 
erts of Co. E, and Barnett Byrkett of Co. F. 
Col. Norman Eddy commanded the regiment, 
Edward P. Stanfleld was adjutant; Dr. L. J. 
Ham and Dr. Sylvester Lannmg, surgeons, and 
Dr. W. W. Butterworth, assistant surgeon. 

The 73d regiment also, was partly composed 
of local citizens . It was first commanded by 
Col. Gilbert Hathaway of Laporte. and after 
his death by Col. Alfred B. Wade of this city. 
who was afterward appointed postmaster of 
South Bend. 

The S7th regiment was organized at South 
Bend, August 28, 1862, and Company K was 
recruited here. 

In the 128th regiment, Company D was en- 
tirely made up of residents of South Bend and 
the vicinity. 

This county also furnished Co. H of the 
138th regiment, and of this company Elmer 
Crockett, past commander of Auten post and 



4G 



SOUTH BEND. 



President of the Tribune Printing Company, 
and Sergeant A. J. Bodkins, ot the police 
force, are the survivors. Co. G of the 155th 
regiment was also composed principally of re- 
cruits from St. Joseph County. 

The 12th Indiana regiment of Cavalry con- 
tained a strong company from this locality, 
and Lieut. Joseph Turnock afterward became 
its captain. 

The 21st Indiana Battery, light artillery, 
also hailed from this locality. The battery 




"OLD JESSE. 

was organized September 9, 1S62, with W. W. 
Andrew of Laporte as captain, and the late 
Alfred B. Miller, of the Tribune, enlisted as 
quartermaster sergeant and returned as a 
lieutenant. W. E. Chess was a lieutenant. 

Among the survivors of the 35th Indiana In- 
fantry, the famous Irish regiment, are P. 
O'Brien, the prominent varnish manufacturer, 
and D. C. Hogue. Rev . Father Peter P. 
Cooney, of Notre Dame, was chaplain. 

Notre Dame also contributed liberally in 
men and means to prosecute the war. It sent 
Rev. Father William Corby as chaplain or 
the famous Irish regiment of New York, com- 
manded by Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher. 
and the other chaplains furnished by Notre 
Dame were: Revs. Father Joseph C. Carrier. 
Paul Gillen. James Dillon, Joseph Leveque 
and J. Bourget, the last three of which died ot 
diseases contracted in the army. Col. William 
Hoynes of the Law department of the Univer- 
sity also served gallantly in a Wisconsin reg- 
iment. 

Truly a record for patriotism and valor of 
which any city might be justly proud. 
GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC. 
The enduring patriotism of the veterans of 
the civil war, who went forth nom tms city 



in defense of the nation in the historic years 
of the rebellion, is best exemplified in the two 
splendid posts of the Grand Army ot the Re- 
public which have been orgamzeu nere, and 
which still maintain the old war discipline and 
harmony, and take active part in an demon- 
strations of a public character, and particu- 
larly in the beautiful and patriotic ce.emonies 
of Decoration Day. 

Auten Post No. 8, named alter John Auten, 
private in Co. I, Ninth Indiana Volunteeis, the 
first soldier from South Bend to sacrifice his 
life for his country, was organized August 31, 
1866, in Odd Fellows' Hall, it was first organ- 
ibed as Post No. 1, District of St. Joseph, 
Department of Indiana and the first officers 
were: Dr. Louis Humphieys, Post Com- 
mander; W. N. Severance, Adjutant; Col. 
Alfred B. Wade, Quartermaster. 

In 1868 the organization was known as 
Auten Post 17, of Indiana, and this continued 
until August, 1879. when it become Post 64 of 
Department of Illinois, with Alfred B. Miller 
as Post Commander; John G. Greenawalt, Ad- 
jutant, and W E. Gorsuch. Quartermaster. 
The post was subsequently organized under 
the Department of Indiana, as Auten Post No. 
8, which title it has since retained. 

Norman Eddy Post No. 579, was organized 
April 27, 1897, and was named in honor of Col. 
Norman Eddy, the heroic soldier, wise states- 
man and honored citizen of South Bend. 
Harvey W. Perkins was the first post com- 
mander; Charles A. Pratt, senior vice com- 
mander; A. P. Matthews, junior vice com- 
mander; W. E. Gorsuch, quartermaster; W. G. 
Denman, chaplain: Milton Titus, surgeon. 

The post has had a successful and harmonious 
existence under Post Commanders H. W. Per- 




IIN THE KIVEH. 

kins. Charles Pratt, A. P. Matthews and E. P. 
Stanfield, and is now in a most prosperous 
condition. 

In addition to these posts there are two relief 
corps composed of ladies known as the Auten 
Relief Corps. No. 14, and the Norman Eddy 
Relief Corps. No. 1, and those connected with 
these organizations have nobly contributed to 



SOUTH BEND. 



4? 



the relief and aid of those who were entitled to 
their gentle ministrations. 

The Sons of Veterans, composed of the sons 
of those who have fought in the battles of the 
rebellion has also been organized in this city, 
and is in a flourishing condition. 

SOUTH BEND IN THE EARLY WARS. 

Among those who silently rest in the beau- 
tiful grounds of the City Cemetery, are the 
heroes who participated in every great 
American war from the revolution to the recent 
war with Spain. 

Of the revolutionary heroes are Peter Roof, 
Sr., and Isaac Ross, both of whom lived to a 
ripe old age. 

Those who fought in the war of 1812 are 
Thomas J. Allen, Daniel Cottrell, Ransom Cur- 
tis, Archibald Defrees. Christopher W. Emrick, 
Daniel Heck, Peter Johnson, John Mack. Sr . 
John Sample and John B. Chandonia. The 
latter was a half-breed Indian and a trusted 
scout of Generals Cass and Harrison in the 
wars of 1812-1814, and was noted for his great 
bravery His grave is unmarked and 
unhonored. 

Among those who participated in the Black 
Hawk war of 1S32, and the Mexican war, arc 
Henry J. Blowney, who was afterward a major 
during the rebellion: John H. Fisher, George F. 
Frank, Hugh L. Hinds. John Owen, Moses 
Pelka, John Pendl, John B. Raymond. William 
C. Saunders, Albert Steinbeck and Frank X. 
Valare. 

THE INDIANA CLUB. 

The Indiana Club of this city was organized 
on December 19, 1892, with a list of thirty char- 
ter members, comprising many of the leading 
business men of this city. The first officers 
were: P. O'Brien, president; George M. Studc- 
baker, vice-president, and John F. Reynolds, 
secretary. 

The club was first located at the northeast 
corner of Michigan and Wayne streets, occupy 
ing the entire third floor of the Myers and 
Paxsou buildings, and the dedication reception 
was held March 23. 1S93. The club was incor- 
porated under the laws of the state, August 
15. 1S93. and in 1S96 the members of the club 
decided to secure larger quarters. The matter 
was referred to a committee which after due 
consideration advocated the purchase of the T. 
M. Studebaker homestead on Main street, and 
to improve the property for club purposes. 
This suggestion was carried to a successful 
arrangement. 

It is purely a social club and is composed of 
the most prominent men of the social and busi- 
ness community of this city, with a number of 
non-resident members. 



The present officers of the club are: A. D. 
Baker, president; Perkins Ellis, vice-president; 
E. B. Reynolds, secretary and treasurer: 
board of governors for three years, A. D. 
Baker, Dr. C. A. Daugherty and George M. Stu- 
debaker; for two years, Perkins Ellis, and one 
year, E. B. Reynolds, Irving A. Sibley and 
George H. Wheelock. 

THE COMMERCIAL-ATHLETIC CLUB. 

The South Bend Commercial-Athletic Club 
found its inception in 1895 when the organiza- 
tion of the South Bend Athletic Association 
was formed by a number of gentlemen of this 
city who are interested in the advancement of 
athletics. Later commercial interests were 
taken up by the association and in June 1800 
the name was changed to the South Bend 
Commercial-Athletic Club, by order of the St 
Joseph County Circuit Court. Property was 
acquired on Colfax avenue and the handsome 
and splendidly equipped club house was 
erected, and the building was dedicated on 
October 1, 189G, and the club has been in 
progressive existence since that time. 

Hon. A. L. Brick was the first president of 
the club, and served two terms, when he was 
succeeded by Mr. Lafayette LeVan, who also 
served for two years. The present officers of 
the club are Dr. D. E. Cummins, president; W. 
A. Rutherford, vice-president; E. J. Fogarty, 
secretary; John E. Campbell, treasurer. The 
directors are Messrs. Lafayette LeVan, D. D. 
Bates. John M. Brown, T. P. Moredock and 
W. P. Kelley. 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

In 1867 the older settlers in his section of the 
state decided to form an organization designed 
to preserve the history of the city and county 
from the early times. As but little of this his- 
tory, interesting as it was. had yet been writ- 
ten, and as correct and reliable data and 
reminiscences could only be obtained from the 
personal recollections of those still the proposi- 
tion to organize a historical society met with 
popular favor and a meeting was called for that 
purpose on October 26, 1867, in the city 
council room. 

The object of the association was declared to 
be "to collect the early and correct history of 
St. Joseph Valley and especially St. Joseph 
County, and to preserve the same in a durable 
form." The first officers were Horatio Chapin, 
president: Elisha Egbert, Daniel Dayton and 
John A. Hendricks, vice-president; William H. 
Drapier, secretary and librarian; Thomas S 
Stanfield, corresponding secretary, and John T. 
Lindsey, treasurer. A number of interesting 
papers were read at the various meetings, and 




RESIDENCE OF HON. A. L. BRICK. 



SOUTH BEND. 



49 



much valable historical information was col- 
lected and compiled, but after a few years in 
terest in the society waned and its meetings 
were finally discontinued. 

THE NORTHERN INDIANA HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY. 

On January 22, 1895. a meeting was called in- 
viting a number of the citizens and business 
men of South Bend interested in historical mat- 
ters, the purpose of which meeting was 
the formation of a historical society, and 
for the collection and safe keeping of such 
data, relics, papers and other matters as would 
form an interesting addition to the history of 
this section of the state. Among those first in- 
terested were: Willis A. Bugbee, Richard H. 
Lyon, O. M. Knoblock, C. N. Fassett, Charles 



ical practitioners of the St. Joseph Valley, and 
it was called the "Medical Society of Northern 
Indiana." The first meeting was held in the 
American Hotel in this city, and the following 
were the first officers of the association: Dr. 
Asa Egbert, president: Dr. George Rex, vice- 
president; Dr. Daniel Dayton, recording secre- 
tary; Dr. F. W. Hunt, corresponding secre- 
tary; Dr. A. B. Merritt, treasurer. Censors, 
Dr. L. B. Rush, Griffin Smith, Lyman Griffin, 
J. Chapman and R. L. Groton. 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 
This society was practically organized on 
July 2, 1855, when a constitution was adopted 
and the following officers elected: President, 
Dr. Louis Humphreys; vice-president, Dr. R 
Pierce; secreta.y. Dr. J. H. Rerick; treasurer. 




WASHINGTON STREET EAST FROM HIGH SCHOOL. 



H. Bartlett, George Ford, James DuShane. 
Howard S. Stanfield, William B. Stover, Georgo 
A. Baker, Mary Ewing Studebaker. Flora L. 
Stanfield. Martha 0. Hubbard, Bessie A. Baker, 
Sarah E. Taylor and Anna Thrush Fassett. The 
society was incorporated February 29, 1896, and 
to-day has an active membership of nearly one 
hundred. The present officers of the society 
are: Ex-Judge Timothy E. Howard, president: 
Mrs. Howard Stanfield. vice-president; Otto M. 
Knoblock, treasurer, and George A. Baker, 
secretary. 

MEDICAL SOCIETIES. 
In May, 1839, the first concerted effort was 
made to effect an organization among the rued- 



Dr. Jacob Hardman; committee on admission. 
Drs. J. B. Buchtel and Reuben Pierce, and 
committee on ethics, Drs. D. Dayton, D. B. 
Van Tuyl and J. B. Brown. 

The society held regular meetings until 
1859, when they ceased. On May 12, 1865, it 
was reorganized and a new constitution 
adopted, but after two years it again sus- 
pended, and was again reorganized in 1S75. 
and is now in successful operation. 

ST. JOSEPH VALLEY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

This association was organized July 10, 
1874, in this city and is composed of the 
physicians in regular practice from Elkhart. 



50 



SOUTH BEND. 



St. Joseph and Laporte Counties in Indiana, 
and from Cass and Berrien Counties in Mich- 
igan. Thirty-eight members assisted in the 
organization, and Dr. Loins Humphreys was 
elected president, with E. W. McAllister as 
secretary. This society is in successful ex- 
istence. 

HOTELS. 

From the first inception of the town of South 
Bend, the entertainment of the public has 
ever been most hospitably attended to. and 
from the first pioneer log tavern of early days 
to the imposing Oliver of the present time, 
strangers have ever found a hospitable welcome, 
and have received the best service which the 
conditions of the times and the facilities of 
the hotels afforded. 

Calvin Lilley was the proprietor of the first 
hotel opened in South Bend. It stood upon 
the banks of the river and fronted the trail 
now known as Vistula evenue. It was a fa- 
mous place in its day, and was the resort of 
the leading spirits in this section of the coun- 
try. It was a rude log house, with low 
doorway and diminutive windows, but it was 
ably managed by its popular proprietor. The 
circuit court of St. Joseph County held its 
first session in this tavern. 

Among the historic hotels of the early davs 
of South Bend was the Old "Union Hall." 
which was kept by Benjamin Coquillard. the 
father of Alexis Coquillard. and which was 
located at the corner of Pearl avenue and 
Washington st' eets. It was ouilt in 1830, of 
hewn logs, with chimneys of sticks and mud. 
and its rough door was supplied with a wooden 
latch and buckskin latch string. Mr. Coquil- 
lard was most ably assisted by his energetic 
wife. Sophia and the hotel acquired a wide 
reputation for hospitality and comfort. 

Peter Johnson came to South Bend in 1830 
and built the Michigan Hotel at the corner of 
Michigan ana "Washington streets, where 
Coonley's drug store now stands. He paid 
$10 for the lot and in 1835 sold the property for 
$3,000. and the name was 
changed to the American, 
with Koehler & Duey as pro- 
prietors 

The Eagle Hotel soon fol- 
lowed at 118-120 Washington 
street. It was kept by John 
Diehl. The Washington House 
was located at the northeast 
corner of Main and Washing- 
ton streets, and its first pro- 
proietor was John Hooper. 
Benjamin Wall also erected 




a frame tavern at the southeast corner of 
Michigan and Jefferson streets which he con- 
ducted for several years. 

In 1810 the Exchange Hotel, now known as 
the New Sheridan, was erected by William L. 
Earl, who was its first land.ord. It was after- 
ward managed by a Mr. Gibbs. and called the 
Gibbs House, and later by Uwight Deming and 
known as the Dwight House, and it was after- 
\\ ;i (1 known as the Sheridan. It has been 
under the control of Sam Regan, Capt. Mills, 
J. H. Knight, George Home. William Mason, 
John F. Kirby and others, and has undergone 




THE OLD OLIVER HOUSE. 

many additions and alterations. In 1S95 Bird 
Bickford purchased the property and is in con- 
trol of the hotel known as the "New Sher- 
idan." 

Another of the older and well known hos- 
telries of this city was the old St. Joe House, 
which was located on the north side of Water 
street, now Colfax avenue, between Michigan 
and Main streets. It was opened to the pub- 
lic shortly after the close of the war and was 
successfully conducted until 1875. 

The old South Bend House located on Mich- 
igan street, near Water street, was also a 
well known house of entertainment in its day. 

THE OLD ST. JOSEPH HOTEL. 

The old St. Joseph Hotel, which occupied 
the site of the present magnificent Oliver 
Hotel, at the northwest corner of Main and 
Washington streets, was the first pretentious 
hostelry erected in this city. 

It was piojected in 1855 by the South Bend 
Hotel Company, but this company became 
financially involved betore the building was 
completed, and the property was sold. 

William Ruckman and President Whitten 
afterward purchased the property, and were 
the owners when it was destroyed by fire in 
the spring of 1865. The hotel was a four 
story brick structure, and was the largest 



SOUTH BEND, 



51 



building in the town. The dedication banquet 
was held September 10, 1S65, and was at- 
tended by leading business men from Cleve- 
land, Chicago, Toledo, South Bend. Elkhart 
and the surrounding towns. William R. Butts 
was the proprietor. The five of 1865 destroyed 
the hotel building. 

On December 24, 1878, the St. Joseph Block 
which occupied the site was destroyed by fire, 
the firemen worked vainly to extinguish the 
flames while the temperature was five de- 



recognition of the worth of Mr. James Oliver, 
and the high esteem in which he was held. 
The hotel was opened with a brilliant recep- 
tion given by J. H. and Godfrey K Knight, 
the lessees. It had a capacity of 100 guests, 
and on the west was Good s Opera House, 
with which it was connected, and the two 
buildings were under one roof. 

This hotel was successfully run until April 
30, 1898, when it was closed preparatory to its 
demolition to make way for the stately and 




RESIDENCE OF MR. JOSEPH D. OLIVER. 



grees below zero. Six buildings were de- 
stroyed and with their contents involved a 
loss of about $60,000, while several firemen 
had their hands and feet frozen. 

In the spring of 1879 the owners of the 
block decided to rebuild the entire frontage 
with a uniform style of architecture, the 
lower floors to be occupied as stores and the 
upper stories to be devoted to hotel purposes. 
They desired to name it the Oliver House in 



imposing new "Oliver," which Mr. Oliver had 
decided to erect. 

THE NEW OLIVER. 

The new Oliver Hotel, which was erected 
and furnished by the public spiiit and munifi- 
cence of Mr. James Oliver, was finished and 
dedicated by a grand reception on the even- 
ing of December 20. 1898, and on the follow- 
ing day was formally opened for business. 



SOUTH BEND. 



The hotel is one of the most magnificent 
structures occupied for hotel purposes in the 
west. It has a frontage on Washington street 
of one hundred and thirty-five feet, and one 
hundred and thirty-five feet on Main street. 
It is six stories in height, and of the most 
tasteful and imposing design of architecture 
in the Renaissance style. The lower floor is 
of light colored stone, and the upper stories 
of cream colored hrick, with enriched terra 
cotta architraves, and with an elaborate and 
artistic frieze and cornice of terra cotta. The 



ing room, with its flower decked ceiling and 
finished in most beautiful designs and with 
the highest legard for artistic harmony and 
richness. 

The paintings in the rotunda are works of 
art, and represent in life size figures, the sea- 
sons, fine arts, poetry, architecture, sculpture, 
painting, the elements, water, fire earth and 
air, and music, song, the drama and the dance. 
The parlors, the Louis XVI, and the Oriental 
rooms are marvels of beauty and finish and 
most luxuriously furnished, and the main din- 




THE OLIVER HOTEL. 



Washington street entrance is marked by a 
handsome Doric portico, with massive stone 
pedestals, and the Main street entrance is pro- 
tected by an elaborately designed porte co- 
chere of wrought iron. 

The interior decorations and furnishings of 
the Oliver are superbly artistic and most beau- 
tiful in every detail, from the expansive and 
imposing rotunda, with its grand fresco orna- 
mentations, to the sleeping apartments upon 
the upper floor. The parlors, dining rooms, 
guest chambers, halls and corridors are all 



ing room, with its flower decked ceiling and 
tapestry panels upon the walls, is a dream of 
beauty. The spacious banquet room is most 
elaborately decorated, the panels in the walls 
are finished in crimson silk, with a back- 
ground of deep cream colored with gold, while 
the ceiling represents a large tinted panel em- 
bellished with foity-flve life size allegorical 
cherubs emblematic of the arts and seasons. 

In every respect the new Oliver Hotel is 
one of the most magnificent and imposing edi- 
fices and in every detail and finish and furni- 



SOUTH BEND. 



53 



ture is artistically beautiful, and enduringly 
attractive. The present manager of the hotel 
is Mr. George E. Wolf, who is one of the 
most popular and efficient notel managers in 
the country. 

One of the chief attractions of the rotunda 
of this splendid hotel is a massive and beau- 
tiful gold loving cup, presented to Mr. James 
Oliver, by his numerous admiring mends in 
South Bend. It is of superb design with bas 
relief medallions ot Mr. Oliver and his most 
estimab.e wife, and miniature rep.oductions 
of the pioneer factory and the modern exten- 
sive works of the Oliver Chilled Plow Com- 
pany. Aside from the great intrinsic and 
artistic value it is prized more uy its honor- 
able recipient as an evidence of the high es- 
teem and waim regard entertained tor him by 
his friends and associates in the city which 
has been the scene of his struggles and his 
great triumphs. 

The other hotels in South Bend at the 
present time are the Winusor, the Johnson, 
and the Columbia. 

RIVERVIEW CEMETERY. 

The Riverview Cemetery Association was in- 
corporated in 1900 by a number of prominent 
business men of this city with a capital of $50,- 
000, and the work of establishing a new burial 
place for South Bend was formally inaugurated. 
The site selected is located about two miles 
north of the city on the old portage bend of the 
St. Joseph river, and which was formerly the 
property of James R. Miller. The tract em- 
braces about fifty acres and already great 
improvements have been made to the grounds, 
which have been artistically laid out in 
avenues and walks and sections and lots have 
been platted with due regard to symmetry and 
natural beauty. 

A massive stone entrance oi imposing design 
has been constructed of native field stone, and 
furnished with solid steel and iron gates of 
artistic design, and the entire cemetery is 
enclosed by a high and substantial iron fence. 
A receiving vault, with a frontage of handsome 
design, and an entrance building, which com- 
bine the material uses of an office and the 
sacred functions of a chapel have been erected 
which materially add to the architectural 
beauty of this picturesque and romantic "God's 
Acre." The officers of the company are: Dr. 
D. E. Cummins, president; Fred H. Badet, vice- 
president; Thomas W. Slick, secretary, and 
Elmer Crockett, treasurer. The board of 
directors is composed of the officers and 
Samuel Good, John W. Teal, Lafayette LeVan, 
Albert Myers and Richard H. Lyon. 



FRATERNAL SOCIETIES. 

The fraternal spirit of South Bend is mani- 
fested by the large number of fraternal orders 
which have successful organizations in this 
city, and all of them in a flourishing anil har- 
monious condition . 

WOMEN'S CLUBS. 

The Progress Club, of South Bend, was 
organized in May, 1895. The officers selected 
were Catherine C. Esmay, president; Mary 
Stull Studebaker, first vice-president; Laura 
Putnam Chaffee, second vice-president; Mary L. 
Hine, third vice-president; Sarah Louise Kirby, 




THE OLIVER LOVING CUP. 



recording secretary; Mary Kaufmann Wiggins, 
corresponding secretary, and Mary Porter Le- 
Van, treasurer. The directors are Olive Tarbell 
Birdsell, Elizabeth Kizer, Cora B. Nicar, Sarah 
Harris, Albert B. Jones. Carrie Johnson Bast, 
Elizabeth G. Kettring and Nellie N. Livingston. 
The club has organized departments of history, 
literatuie, current events, art, philanthropy 
and civics, domestic science and music. 

The present membership of the club is one 
hundred and thirty, and each department is 



54 



SOUTH BEND. 



mcst admirably managed. It is the largest 
organization of its class in the state of Indiana, 
and was instrumental in securing ' he Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs in the state. The 
present officers of the club are: Mrs. E. G. 
Kettring. president; Mrs. Martha C. Rich, first 
vice-president; Mrs. Chester Reynolds, second 
vice-president: Mrs. E. L. Clarke, third vice- 
president; Helen Baker, recording secretary; 
Mrs. F. M. Hatch, corresponding secretary; 
Elinor Tong, treasurer. 

During its eventful career the club has suc- 
ceeded in securing the appointment of a woman 



leading' spirit; the Wednesday Club, and the 
Shakespeare Club, in which Mrs. Willis A. 
Bugbee takes a leading part, and the Century 
Club. 

MANUFACTURES. 

To its great manufacturing industries more 
than to any other agency is South Bend in- 
debted for its wonderful growth and expansion, 
and its present important position among tin 
commercial and industrial cities of the country. 

The first building erected in this city for 
manufacturing purposes was located near the 




THE ARNOLD OFFICE BLTLDINli. 



upon the school board, and has established and 
conducted a free kindergarten for poor chil- 
dren during the past four years. The head- 
quarters of the club are at No. 307 West Jeffer- 
son street. 

The other women's clubs in the city are the 
Women's Club, which was organized in 1875, 
and of which Mrs. Schuyler Colfax is the 



intersection of Division and Taylor streets. Ii 
was a frame building, about sixty feet by eighty 
feet, with an extension, and was built in 1830. 
It was constructed for a glass manufacturing 
establishment which was started by a company 
of which John Brownfield, John T. McClelland 
and Johnson Horrell were the chief members. 
An expert glass man from the east named 



SOUTH BEND, 



55 



Samuel Johnson, came here and finding an 
excellent quality of sand in this vicinity, ue 
experimented with it, and became enthusiastic 
over its glass making qualities, and induced the 
above named gentlemen to embark in the man- 
ufacture of glass. 

It was found, however, when too late, that the 
clay, which was an important factor in glass 
manufacture, could not be obtained at any 




O.N THE ST. JOE 

reasonable price, and transportation rates were 
so exorbitant that it was soon found that the 
enterprise would not prove successful or 
profitable, and it was soon abandoned. For 
years afterward the building, which was used 
for public meetings, was known as the "old 
glass house," but it eventually was demolished, 
the ground laid out in building lots and is now- 
covered with comfortable and commodious 
residences. 

The first manufactory located here which 
achieved success and permanency was that of 
Mr. Eliakim Briggs, who was the patentee and 
manufacturer of a "Traveling Threshing Ma- 
chine." which was very popular among the 
farmers in the west. His first factory was 
located at the northeast corner of Michigan 
and Jefferson streets, and was propelled by a 
large windmill erected on the premises. 

He afterward built an extensive factory at 
the southwest corner of Vistula avenue and 
Wayne streets, which he occupied for a number 
of years. Mr. Briggs employed a number of 
young men in his factory who afterward be- 
came prominent manufacturers and business 
men in this city. He died in 1865, but the old 
factory remained standing until two years ago. 
when it gave place to the car barns of the 
Indiana Railway Company. 

Mr. John Studebaker, the father of the pres- 
ent Studebaker Bros., was also early engaged 



in business here, and soon after his arrival in 
South Bend he opened a wagon repair and 
blacksmith shop, where he toiled early and late 
to earn a subsistence for his family which con- 
sisted of five sons and five daughters. He was 
noted for his great hospitality, and the emi- 
grants who passed here on their way west, were 
the recipients of his generosity. No one was 
ever turned from his door and during the win- 
ter he would be awake all night attending the 
fire to keep his guests comfortable. 

President Whitten and the Chockelt Bros, 
were also extensive manufacturers of wagon.; 
in this city, the former disposing of his in- 
terests to the Studebaker Bros., and the latter 
industry being now conducted by Mr. Edmund 
A. Chockelt. 

Among the other leading manufacturing in- 
dustries which contributed their giant's share 
to the advancement of the city, are the Oliver 
Plow Works, the Studebaker Bros. Manufactur- 
ing Company, the Coquillard Wagon Works, 
the Singer Sewing Machine Company, the Mal- 
leable Steel Range Compauy, the South Bend 
Malleable Iron Works, the Staley Woolen Mills, 
the Indiana Lumber Company, the Sandage 
Steel Skein Company, the Folding Paper Box 
Company, Smith & Jackson, the Hoke Manu- 
facturing Company, the Bissell Chilled Plow 
Works, the South Bend Pulley Company, C. C-. 
Folsom, the South Bend Toy Manufacturing 




ABOVE THE l'OHTAGE. 

Company, and a host of others whose histories, 
progress and present development are recited 
more fully in another portion of this volume. 

THE CITY HALL. 

For the first time in its history South Bend 
will possess a building which will be especially 
devoted to the administration of municipal 
affairs, and which will afford a proper home 



56 



SOUTH BEND 



for the various departments of the city govern- 
ment. The City Hall will be erected on the 
east side of Main street, north of Colfax avenue, 
and will be a magnificent structure in the 
French renaissance style of architecture and 
will be completed ready for occupancy on April 
1, 1902. 

The building will be 72 feet in front on Main 
street by 158 feet deep, three stories in height, 
with a massive high sloping roof of tile, and 
with an ornamental clock tower, which extendi 
to the height of 115 feet. The exterior will be 
constructed of Bedford stone, with ornamental 
carvings, and with pressed brick panels to re- 
lieve the general artistic effect. 

All of the city departments will be provided 
with commodious offices for the comfort and 
proper transaction of official business has been 
made. The lower floor of the building will be 
devoted to the policy department. Here are 
also located the Police Court, the Sergeant's 
office, the general lock-up, and two strong cell 
rooms. The street commissioner's office and 
the engineer's testing room are also located on 
this floor. In the rear in a special building 
erected for the purpose the stables and patrol 
and ambulances of the police department will 
be kept. 

On the first floor the offices of the various 
city officials will be located, and spacious 
rooms have been provided for the city clerk, 
city comptroller, city engineer, the various 
hoards of the city administration, chief of police 
and other necessary offices On the upper floor 
will be located the office of the mayor, the water 
works commissioners, the board of health, and 
a handsome and spacious council chamber, with 
the necessary committee and 
ante rooms. The council 
chamber will be elaborately 
and artistically decorated 
and furnished with every 
accessory of a modern mu- 
nicipal legislative hall. 

A massive stairway, orna- 
mented with artistically 
wrought iron railings and 
marble steps, will lead to 
the upper floors of the 
building, and the main floors 
will be laid in mosaic of 
handsome design. The of- 
fices will be finished in 
quarter-sawed white oak, 
and the walls and ceilings 
will be painted and frescoed 
in a tasteful manner. 

Every arrangement has 
been made for the disposal 
of the many departments of 




the city government by Messrs. Freyermuth & 
Maurer, the architects of the building, and when 
finished it will be one of the handsomest and 
most imposing municipal buildings in the state. 
The building will be erected at a cost of $80.- 
000 and through the public spirit and generosity 
of Mr. James Oliver, the funds necessary to 
construct the building will be advanced by him, 
and will be repaid to him out of the tax levy 
from year to year until the entire amount is 
repaid. 

THE NEW CITY CHARTER. 

After long, serious and earnest considera- 
tion it was decided to request, from tne legis- 
lature of the state, the adoption of a special 
chaiter for the government of the city, which 
after some delay and many amendatory sug- 
gestions, was finally adopted and has become 
a law. 

Many clauses of the new charter became op- 
erative immediately upon its approval by the 
governor, but it will not become in general 
force and effect until 1902, when the first 
municipal election under its provisions will 
be held. Under the terms of this chaiter the 
elective city officers will consist of a mayor, 
a city judge, a city clerk, one councilman from 
each of the seven wards of the city, and three 
councilmen at large. 

The office of City Treasurer will be abolish- 
ed and his duties will be performeu by the 
County Treasuier. The Boarus of City Com- 
missioners and Park Commissioners are also 
abolished, and the police department will no 
longer be under the metropolitan system. 

Departments for the management of the af- 
fairs of the city have been created, and the 
Mayor is authorized to make all appointments 
in these vaiious branches of city government. 
The new municipal bureaus are: 

Department of Finance. 

Department of Law. 

Department of Public Works. 

Department of Safety. 

Department of Health and Charities. 

Department of Assessments and Collections. 

No other executive or administrative depart- 
ment shall be established in the city, during 
the existence of this chaiter. and no person 
shall be appointed head of a department un- 
less he shall have been a resident oi the city 
for three years. 

THE CITY COURT. 

A city court is created, to be presided over 
by the City Judge, who must be an attorney 
at law, and the Superintendent of Police and 
members of the police force are required to 



SOUTH BEND, 



57 



perform such duties, and are subject to such 
orders as the City Judge shall require. 

The City Judge shall have criminal juris- 
diction in all eases m which the penalty does 
not exceed the term of three yea.s imprison- 
ment in the penitentiary or the imposition of 
a fine does not exceed Sl.Ouo. He also has 
jurisdiction in all cases which properly are 
heard by a Justice of the Peace. 

CITY COUNCIL. 

The City Council shall have the power to 
enact ordinances for the protection of city 



The council shall also have power to fix 
salaries, and perfect supervision over all de- 
partments, offices and employes of the city, 
and are authorized to order the taking of a 
census. In addition to these they have gen- 
eral powers of city government, and may pro- 
vide for the appointment of a City Comptrol- 
ler, and a City Attorney will also be appointed 
by the Mayor, and also to open all streets and 
alleys and nighways ordered by the Board of 
Public Works. The council shall also have 
the power to order the levy of an annual tax 
not exceeding the rate of $1.25 per every $100 




RESIDENCE <>F DR. J. A. VARIER. 



property; to examine into the affaiis of any 
corporation, board or department in which the 
city is interested. No new wards are to be 
created, but present wards may be readjusted 
in order to equalize population, for six years, 
unless the annexation of new territory makes 
it necessary to create a new ward. 



valuation for any one year, and shall have the 
power to borrow money to an amount not ex- 
ceeding two per cent, of the taxable property of 
the city, and may oider the issuance of bonds, 
negotiable or otherwise, with interest not ex- 
ceeding five per cent, and running not more 
than thirty years. 




THE NEW CITY HALL. 



SOUTH BEND. 



59 



DEPARTMENTS. 

The Department of Public "Works shall have 
charge of all matters which formerly were 
under the supervision of the City Commission- 
ers, Water Works Trustees and Park Com- 
missioners, which offices are all abolished. 
All expenses incurred by this board shall be 




THE OLD JAIL. 

payable out of the general lunds of the city 
appropriated to the use of the board and avail- 
able for its p;actical purposes, except where 
it is directed that the same shall be paid for 
by a regular assessment against property 
holders. 

The board shall also manage, control and 
conduct the water works of the city, and shall 
have the power to assess and collect a water 
rent of sufficient amount upon all tenants and 
piemises supplied with water. It shall also be 
authorized to make contracts for increasing 
the buildings and the service of water in the 
city when necessary, and shall have charge 
of all public cemeteries. 

The Department of Public Safety shall con- 
sist of three commissioners, appointed by the 
Mayor, and shall have the care, management, 
supervision and exclusive contiol of all mat- 
ters pertaining to the police and Are depart- 
ments, fire alarms, telegrapn, inspection of 
buildings and boilers, market places and food 
sold therein, and shall have power to purchase 
all necessary supplies and apparatus and shall 
adopt rules for the government of the police 
and fire departments. 

It shall appoint a Superintendent of Police, 
Chief of Fire Department, and all other mem- 
bers of the police and Are forces. The chiefs 



of these two departments, however, to have 
full charge of the departments, subject to the 
rules and regulations adopted by the board. 

After the Arst Monday in September, 1902, 
the office of City Treasurer shall be abolished, 
and thereafter the County Treasurer shall re- 
ceive and collect the taxes of the city for city 
and school purposes, and fulAl all duties now 
performed by the City Treasurer. 

The Department of Health and Charities 
shall be under the contiol of one commis- 
sioner, who must be a practicing physician, 
and who shall be appointed by the Mayor. 

The City Comptroller is the head of the De- 
partment of Finance, and he shall submit an- 
nually a general statement or estimate of 
city expenditures, and for other city purposes 
for the ensuing year, and he shall i>ave gen- 
eral charge of the Anances of the city. 

The Mayor is held responsible for the acts 
of all boards appointed by him and of alj 
subordinate officers, and the intention of the 
new charter is to place the city government 
upon a well systematized and properly man- 
aged business basis. 

CITY OFFICERS. 

The officers of the city government are as 
follows: 

Mayor, Schuyler Colfax. 

City Clerk, L. A. Hull; deputy, H. L. Hull. 

City Treasurer, W. A. Rutherford; deputy, 
T. J. Walsh. 

City Attorney, Wilbert Ward; deputy, S. E. 
Boys. 

City Comptroller, E. P. StanAeld. 

City Engineer, A. J. Hammond; deputies, 
W. S. Mooie, W. E. Graves and Henderson 
McClellan. 

Health Commissioner, Dr. C. M. Butterworth. 







THE VANDALIA DEPOT. 

Street Commissioner, J. W. Fites. 

Board of Public Works, A. L. Hubbard, 
Samuel Leeper and Charles L. Goetz. 

Board of Public Safety, R. 0. Cotton, George 
Feasor and A. J. Ward. 



CO 



SOUTH BEND. 



Chief File Department, Irving A. Sibrel; 
assistant, William Smith. 

Superintentlant of Pom e. Wilber E. Gor- 
such; Sergeants. A. P. Klingel and O. W. Wil- 
liams. 

Building Inspector, Jacob S. Kerner. 

Water Works Superintendent. M. S. Rogers; 
assistant, Charles Creviston. 

City Sexton, John Beck. 

MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

First Ward — John Beyrer, Henry F. Elbel. 
Second Ward — George A. Knoblock. H. T. 
Montgomery. 

Third Ward — Frank Essex, J. H. Hartzer. 
Fourth Ward — P. A. Joyce. Gust. Stuecke. 



given place to the stately mansions and lux- 
urious residences — primitive school houses have 
been supplanted by temples of learning of 
architectural beauty and design, and equipped 
with every modern appliance known to the 
higher educational ethics of the century, and 
modest houses of worship have expanded into 
magnificent churches whose spires reach aloft 
to kiss the skies. 

The rude Indian trails, the high roads and 
lanes of the early times have now become hand- 
somely paved streets and broad thoroughfares, 
shaded by magnificent trees, while along their 
borders are erected the handsome and imposing 
residences of the great manufacturers, the 
progressive merchants, the homes of men of all 




RESIDENCE OF MR. CHARLES ARTHUR CARLISLE. 



Fifth Ward— J. N. Thumm, J. H. Loughman. 

Sixth Ward — Peter Koczoiowski. Leo. M. 
Kucharski. 

Seventh Ward — W. H. Kingsley. M. J. Som- 
ers. 

SOUTH BEND OF TO-DAY. 

The past of this great city is secure. Its his- 
tory is a glowing epitome of hardy and self- 
sacrificing struggle, of laudable ambition, of 
heroic effort and of glorious eccomplishmeiu. 
The wilderness has been redeemed. The haunts 
of the animals of the forest, and the villages 
of the Indian, have been transformed into a 
magnificent city, where civilization abounds and 
art, literature and science have found a per- 
manent home. 

The rude log houses of the pioneers have 



lirofessions. and here also, in luxurious ease, 
reside many of the venerable but sturdy men 
who in the early times by their energy and 
skill, foresight and industry have contributed co 
the glorious results of the present clay. 

A GREAT CITY. 

At the threshold of the twentieth century this 
magnificent city comprises an area of six square 
miles, or nearly tour thousand acres of valuable 
land, while on every side broad prairies and 
far reaching tracts with a population of forty- 
five thousand progressive people, afford every 
facility for substantial expansion in the future. 
It has become one of the greatest manufactur- 
ing centers on the American continent, nearly 
200 industrial establishments being located 
within its borders, whose products are born.' 



SOUTH BEND 



01 



on the swift wings of commerce to every clime. 
From a manufacturing standpoint the 
progress of this city is illimitable. Every 
needed facility is here afforded for the erection 
of mammoth industrial establishments, and the 
liberal spirit and sturdy enterprise of her people 
offer alluring inducements for such locations. 




TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCn. 

Eight great railways enter the city, and nearly 
fifty miles of railway tracks are laid within the 
city limits, while nearly forty passenger trains 
enter and leave this point daily. Of the 
freighting facilities thus afforded, but a meager 
estimate can be made, but when the possibilities 
of railroad enterprise is considered it may be 
said that the future growth of South Bend as a 
manufacturing city is destined to far exceed 
the most sanguine prophecies of her most 
optimistic advocates. 

Already there are located within her domain 
the largest vehicle manufactory, the largest 
plow works, the largest sewing machine case 
factory, the largest toy works and one of the 
largest shirt factories in the world, and new 
and magnificent enterprises are negotiating 
for favorable sites within her borders. 

ITS WONDERFUL GROWTH. 

As an evidence of the substantial material 
growth of this city, it may be stated that La 
1845, when the town was organized, the total 
value of taxable property in Portage township, 
as shown by the records of the township 
assessor, was but $339,599. In 1865, when thG 
city of South Bend was incorporated, the total 
valuation of taxable property in the township 
was $559,435, thus showing a most satisfactory 



increase. But in 1900, after thirty-five years 
cf steady development, the books of the tax 
assessor show a taxable valuation on lots in 
South Bend alone, of $5,672,560; on improve- 
ments, $4,580,690, and on personal property, 
$4,225,130, and deducting the amount of mort- 
gaged indebtedness allowed by the law of $519,- 
property located within the city limits is esti- 
900, leaves a total valuation of $13,958,480 for 
the year 1900, while the actual value of the 
mated at $30,000,000. Truly a magnificent 
record of but at little more than a third of a 
century's development and progress as a. 
municipality. 

In the matter of steadily increasing popula- 
tion, also, South Bend furnishes another strik- 
ing illustration of substantial advancement. In 
1831 the population of the city, then in the 
wilds of northern Indiana, was. according to 
reliable authority, but 128. According to suc- 
ceeding census reports of the United States 
government, in 1840 the population had in- 
creased to 727; in 1850, 1,653 residents were 
enumerated in this city; in 1860, 3,832 people 
claimed South Bend as their home; in 1870 the 
returns showed 7,206 inhabitants; in 1880 the 
number had increased to 13,392; in 1890 to 21,- 
873, and at the last census, taken at the close 
of the nineteenth century, the population of 
the city was reported by the government 
enumerators as 35,999, and it is claimed by 
many that this report failed to do full justice 




RESIDENCE OF MR. VOL TOEIT. 

to the phenomenal growth of the city in popula- 
tion, which they confidently assert is nearly 
40,000. 

ATTRACTIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 
Within the incorporated limits of the city 
there are laid out and opened for public use 



02 



SOUTH BEND. 



one hundred and three miles of streets and 
alleys, nearly eighteen miles of which are paved 
with brick, four miles of asphalt pavement and 
three miles of other substantial materials, while 
arrangements are being made for the paving of 
many additional streets in the near future. 

That the city authorities are alive to the im- 
portance of substantial street improvements 
is evidenced from the fact that since 1889 there 
has been expended for this purpose $1,292,937.61, 
and in 1900, alone, the amount expended by the 
city for street improvements was $283,145.33. 

Nor has the city been unmindful of the 
healthful recreation of her people, for it ha"3 
one hundred and nine acres of splendidly 
located land, set apart for public parks, all of 
whch give evidence of the artistic work of the 
landscape gardener and are of surpassing nat- 
ural beauty. In Howard Park there are fifteen 
acres; in Springbrook Park thirty-eight acres, 
which will be materially increased, and in Stu- 
debaker Park fifty-six acres. 

As an educational center South Bend is un- 
surpassed. Its massive school buildings are 
models of art, convenience and adaptability, 
and are most admirably conducted. The 
schools and academies of the Catholic church, 
and other religious denominations located here. 




RES. OF MR. W. E. GELTZ. 

are all in a most flourishing condition, and 
contribute their powerful influences to the 
proper rearing of the young, and the advance- 
ment of the higher standards of civilization and 
progress. 

The great University of Notre Dame and the 
beautiful St. Mary's Academy are also located 



here, and the fame of these two institutions has 
been carried to every portion of the civilized 
globe. No city of its dimensions possesses such 
high educational advantages as this great in- 
land city of the west. South Bend. 

The water supply of the city is of the finest 
and is practically inexhaustible, and its sewage 
outlet combines all the essential elements of 




RESIDENCE OF MR. GEO. HODSOX. 

healthfulness and sanitation, while the immense 
water power of the St. Joseph river has con- 
tributed a mighty factor to the wheels of 
industry and the excellence of its manufactures. 

The street railway service of South Bend is 
of a character demanded by the progressive 
necessities of a progressive people, and al- 
though numerous extension of the system are in 
course of construction, the present service is 
most commendable and satisfactory. There 
are ten miles of street railway tracks within the 
city limits, and twenty-five miles of suburban 
tracks, and the commodious coaches are pro- 
pelled by electricity. The cities of Goshen. 
Elkhart and Mishawaka are brought within 
easy distance of South Bend by this convenient 
agency, and in the near future other branches 
will lie constructed linking this city with the 
thriving towns and villages on the north and 
west. 

The financial necessities and requirements of 
the city are amply and satisfactorily conserved. 
There are three successful and well managed 
National Banks located here, and a Savings 



SOUTH BEND. 



03 



Bank whose deposits represent the thrift, 
economy and general prosperity of her peoplo. 
The deposits of the St. Joseph County Savings 
Bank of this city, compare most favorably with 
similar institutions located in cities whose 
population far outnumbers that of South Bend. 
Two Loan and Trust companies are also in 
successful operation here, and reflect the finan- 
cial security and progressive spirit of the people. 
Through the public spirit and generosity of 
Mr. James Oliver and the Messrs. Studebaker 
two magnificent temples of the drama have 
been erected in this city, which afford every 
facility for healthful amusement, intellectual 
advancement and dramatic entertainment that 
can possibly be desired. The tasteful and cosy 



Oliver Opera House, and the stately and com- 
modious Auditorium, are magnificent archi- 
tectural aditions to the city, and stand as en- 
during monuments to the liberality and civic 
pride of their honored projectors. 

THE FUTURE. 

This is the South Bend of to-day. Of the 
future naught may be definitely foretold. But 
from the record of its glorious past and the 
living evidences of its present greatness among 
the cities of the west, the future years will but 
add lustre to her fame and coming historians 
will chronicle her grand achievements along 
the lines of increased prosperity and expanding 
magnitude. 







Historical Painting In St. Joseph County Court House. By permission of Arthur Thomas, Artist. N . Y. 

LA SALLE AT THE MIAMI TREATY, MAY, 1681. 




ON '/THE BANKS OF THE WINDING RIVER, 



SOUTH BEND. 



G5 



University of Notre Dame. 



ONE of the leading educational institu- 
tions of America conducted under the 
benign influences of the Catholic Church 
is the great University of Notre Dame, or 
Notre Dame du Lac, as it is more properly 
named, and which is located about two miles 
noith of this city. From a rough two story 
log house whicn served the triple purposes 
of chapel, school house and dormitory in lS4n 



superior on the continent within its lines nr 
upon the plane upon which it was established. 
To the Congregation of the Holy Cross, a re- 
ligious order which had its origin in the city 
of Mans, Prance, this great institution owes 
its inception and its present prominent po- 
sition in the religious and educational world. 
The society was founded by Abbe Moreau, and 
Father Sorin became one of its earliest and 








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UNIVERSITY OF NOTJiB DAME. 



to the present collection of expansive and 
stately edifices which now grace the beauti- 
ful grounds of Notre Dame, was but the grand 
realization of the dreams and earnest labors 
of its nonorcd founder and first president 
Very Rev. Edward Sorin. The fame of the 
University of Notre Dame extends over the 
entire civilized globe, and its influence for 
good and the upbuilding of humanity is felt 
in every strata of modern society. It is sui 
generis, and stands alone a perpetual monu- 
ment to the memory of those heroic and self- 
sacrificing fathers led by Father Sorin who 
came to the wilderness of Northern Indiana, 
and there laid the foundations, deep and sure, 
of an educational institution which has no 



most devoted members. The young priest had 
listened to the glowing words of Bishop Brute, 
of Vincennes, Indiana, when he was in France 
seeking missionary assistance for the wilds 
of Indiana, and when later his successor 
Bishop Hailandiere applied to Bishop Moreau 
for clerical volunteers for Indiana missions, 
Father Sorin was the first to offer himself for 
the great work. His offer was accepted and 
with four brothers and two novices Father 
Sorin left the Mother House at Mans on 
August 5, 1842, and set out upon his journey 
to the far off field of his life's labor. The 
little party arrived in New York on Septem- 
ber 13, and then traveled to Vincennes, where 
they located for over a year gaining several 



SOUTH BEND 



67 



accessions to their order. To them the bishop 
made an offer of a tract of land he owned on 
the St. Joseph river provided they would 
erect a college there within two years. This 
offer was accepted and on November 16, 1842. 
Father Sorin and his associates sought the 
new location in the wilderness and arrived on 
the shores of lake St. Mary on November 26 
The weather was bitterly cold but they were 
deeply impressed with the beauty of the 
country which was to be the scene of their 
future labors. It was on this spot that Fathers 
Badin, De Seille and Petit had labored ou 
their mission and the Indians had already 
learned the beauties of the Christian faith. 

A log structure twenty-four feet by forty- 
six feet was erected in December in which 
they remained during the winter, which was 
a most severe one. A square brick house wag 
erected the following year which served for a 
time for college purposes, and Alexis Co- 
quillard became the first student of this primi- 
tive institution. The little colony was in- 
creased by the arrival from France of Rev. 
Francis Cointet, who died of cholera in 1853, 
Fathers Marivault and Gouesse, one brother 
and four sisters, and in August 1843 the archi- 
tect and two workmen came from Vincennes 
to erect the college building. But the colony 
was without funds, and the erection of the 
buildings seemed an impossibility, when 
Father Marivault offered to donate $1,200.00, 
which was due him in Fiance, and with a 
credit of $2,000.00 at his store offered by 
Samuel Byerley, of South Bend, and a loan of 
$500.00 in cash, work was commenced and the 
corner stone of the new building was laid 
on August 28, 1843, and by the end of the year 
the walls were up and the building under 
cover, while the next season the interior was 
finished. This building was eighty feet by 
thirty-six feet, four stories high, and to this 
the students were at once removed from the 
first building, and in August, 1844, the first 
exercises took place. In January, 1844, 
through Assemblyman Hon. John D. Defrees, 
a charter was secured for the university en- 
abling it to confer degrees, and this act was 
the legal inception of the present famous Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame. In May, 1844, the 
corner stone of the chapel of the Novitiate 
on the Island was laid, the building completed 
and consecrated December 8, and on the same 
day the Arch Confraternity, the oldest reli- 
gious society at Notre Dame, was established. 
This chapel was used until 1848, when a new 
brick church was consecrated. The first an- 
nual course of study was begun in September, 
1844, and the first commencement exeicises 



were held August 1, 1845, the first hoy to 
carry off the honors of the institution being 
an orpban boy from Philadelphia, named Ha- 
guin. The first faculty of the college consisted 
of the following: Father Sorin, president; 
Father Alexis Granger, vice president; Father 
Cointet, professor of ancient languages; 
Father Gouesse, music; Brother Gatien, mathe- 
matics, Rev. E. Shaw, rhetoric; Gardener 
Jones, English composition, and Denis 
O'Leary, Brother Basil, Father Shortis, Prof. 
Girac and Prof Burns, general tutors. The 
first catalogue of students was issued in 
1818, and the commencement took place in 
July. At the commencement in 1849 the first 
Bachelor of Arts was graduated, Neil H. Gil- 
lespie, who was ordained priest in 1856. The 
Manual Labor school was also chartered In 
1844, and here the hoys were taught the 
practical use of tools and the various import- 
ant trades. In 1851 the Lake Shore railroad 
was completed to South Bend, and during that 
year Notre Dame was granted post office 
privileges by the government through the in- 
fluence of Henry Clay. In 1853 it was found 
necessary to erect the two wings of the origi- 
nal college owing to the increase of the num- 
ber of students, and during this year the 
cholera became epidemic and many of the 
worthy brothers succumbed to the terrible 
disease, among the first being Father Coin- 
tet. In 1856 the present chime of twenty- 
three bells arrived from France and was 
placed in the new church of the Sacred Heart. 
During the civil war Notre Dame contributed 
heroically to the struggle and scarcely a bat- 
tle was fought in which the students of this 
institution did not take part. Father Sorin 
sent seven priests, Fathers William Corby. 
Peter P. Cooney, Joseph C. Carrier, Paul Gil- 
len. James Dillon, Joseph Leveque and Bour- 
get, as chaplains in the army, and a number of 
sisters under the charge of Mother Angela 
rendered most invaluable service as nurses in 
the hospitals of the south and west. In No- 
vember, 1863, the number of registered stu- 
dents had increased to 230 and the original 
buildings were found too small to accommo- 
date those who desired admission to the col- 
lege, consequently in 1865 preparations were 
made to remove the old buildings and erect 
a newer, handsomer and more extensive col- 
lege in every particular. During this year 
Father Patrick Dillon assumed the presidency 
and with the aid of Prof. Lucius G. Tong, and 
Prof. J. A. Lyons, he added the commercial 
to the classical course of the university, and 
later aided by Rev. Joseph C. Carrier he es- 
tablished the scientific course and supplement- 
ed the degrees in arts with the degrees of 
Bachelor and Master of Science, and the first 



68 



SOUTH BEND. 



Bachelor of Science was Dr. John Cassidy 
of South Bend. The study of medicine was 
also introduced and placed in charge of Rev. 
Father Neyron, who nad been a surgeon in 
Napoleon's army before he became a priest. 
The new building, eighty feet by one hundred 
and sixty feet, and six stories high was dedi- 
cated in May, 1866, by Archbishop Spalding 
of Baltimore, and shortly afterward Father 
Dillon left the presidency and went to France. 



H. Lyons; secretary. Frof. Michael T. Corby; 
orator, Edmund B. Kilroy, of Port Sarnia; al- 
ternate orator, James O'Brien, of Galena, 111.; 
poet, Prof. Timothy E. Howard, and alternate 
poet. Prof. Arthur J. Stace. The silver jubilee 
of the college was celebrated with imposing 
ceremonies in 1869 and were in honor of 
Father Sorin who had been elevated to the 
office of Superior General of the Congregation 
of the Holy Cross in 186S. A number of liter- 




MAIN BCILDING, FRONT VIEW. 



Father William Corby succeeded to the presi- 
dency and filled that office until 1S72. During 
his administration the number of students in- 
creased, the courses of study were rearranged, 
and the institution placed on a par with the 
leading eastern colleges. On June 2,7, 1868, 
tne Alumni Association of the college was 
organized, it being first suggested by Francis 
C. Bigelow, and the officers elected were: 
President, Neil H. Gillespie; vice-presidents, 
Francis C. Bigelow, of Ohio, and James B. 
Runnion, of Chicago; treasurer, Prof. Joseph 



ary publications were issued at Notre Dame 
but none attained permanency until in 1865 
when Father Sorin established the Ave Maria, 
which soon gained a circulation of over 25,- 
000 weekly and was sent all over the world. 
The Ave Maria is now one of the best of the 
Catholic publications. In 1867 Father Corby 
practically established The Scholastic, and 
this brilliant magazine is successful and 
regularly published at the college. Early in 
the seventies a thorough course in civil en- 
gineering and a partial course in medicine 



SOUTH BEND. 



G9 



were established, and ten years later Fattier 
Walsh, with the assistance of Fathers Zah.ni 
and Kirseh added courses in applied electricity, 
mechanical engineering and biology, all of 
which departments are now in a most flourish- 
ing condition. In February, 1869, Father Cor- 
by founded a law department which was 
opened under the direction of Prof. Colovin, 
with Peter Foote, Francis C. Bigelow and Hon. 
Lucius C. Tong, as assistants. In 1883 Prof. 
William Hoynes was placed in charge and the 



Father Corby, who was again called to the presi- 
dency, with Rev. Thomas E. Walsh as vice-presi- 
dent and director of studies. One of the first 
acts of the new administration was to improve 
the facilities for athletic exercises. Base ball 
and foot ball was introduced, and now a campus 
of thirty acres is set apart for these popular 
games On the morning of Wednesday, April 
23, 1879, a terrible disaster befell the college, and 
the extensive main college building with five 
other buildings were destroyed by fire, with all 




THE GROTTO. 



course was made three years. In 1872 Father 
Augustus Lemonnier was appointed president 
and he served until 1874. Under his admin- 
istration a school of painting, under the cele- 
brated Roman artist Gregori, was founded, and 
a circulating library created. Father Lemon- 
nier, however, died October 29, 1874, with many 
of his brilliant plans for the development of 
the college yet untried. He was succeeded by 
Rev. Patrick J. Colovin who acted as president 
until 1877, and he, in turn, was succeeded by 



their priceless accumulated treasures of years. 
Father Sorin, who was then in his sixty-sixih 
year was on his way to Rome at the time, and 
had lingered in Montreal on the journey. The 
news was a severe shock to him, but he rallied 
at once, and giving up his proposed journey, he 
returned immediately to Notre Dame, his great 
mind filled with thoughts of rebuilding the great 
college on broader and grander lines, and on his 
arrival he commenced to plan for the new build- 
ings he intended to erect. In September of tho 



70 



SOUTH BEND 



same year the present administration build- 
ing, far superior in every respect to the old 
one, was finished and the returning stu- 
dents at once resumed their studies. The im- 
posing edifice is of the neogothic style of 
architecture, four stories high, shaped like 
the letter T and surmounted with a stately 
and magnificent dome. The interior is deco- 
rated by Luigi Gregori the Italian artisc, 
with frescoes illustrating the life of Columbus, 
with full length portraits of Columbus and 
Queen Isabella illuminating the spacious vest! - 
bule. The interior of the dome is also painted 
in allegorical subjects by Gregori. These paint- 
ings were finished and the dome opened with 



to the main building, Sorin Hall was buiit 
and in 1882 St. Edward's Hall for the use 
of the minims was erected. On June 30, 
1883, the corner stone of Science Hall was 
dedicated by Rt. Rev. John Watterson, Bishop 
of Columbus. Under President Walsh there 
was also erected the Institution of Technol- 
ogy, Mechanics' Hall and an Astronomical Ob- 
servatory. The buildings of the university com- 
pleted under Presidents Corby and Walsh 'are 
the main building three hundred and twenty 
feet by one hundred and fifty-five feet built of 
yellow brick, with a dome covered with pure 
gold leaf and surmounted by a statue of the 
Blessed Virgin, crowned with a halo of electric 




VIEW OF THE CAMPUS, LOOKING EAST. 



appropriate ceremonies on May 29, 1890, when 
Bishop Keane delivered a masterly oration. 
This building is furnished with every modern 
convenience, the rooms and halls are devoted to 
every department of Knowledge known to the 
modern university, and supplied with every ap- 
pliance and apparatus for the successful prosecu- 
tion of every branch of study. Rev. Thomas E. 
Walsh assumed the presidency of the university 
in 1881, and most ably filled that distinguished 
office until his death in 1S93. Although but 
twenty-eight years of age he was a ripe scholar, 
a man of superior mental qualifications and 
possessed of broad and comprehensive views. 
During his administration two wings were added 



lights, two hundred and seven feet above the 
ground. Music Hall, or the Academy of Music, 
with its Washington Hall, is one hundred and 
seventy feet by one hundred feet and over one 
hundred feet high. It is octagonal in form, 
with ample stage, and seats about 1,500. It is 
lighted by electricity. Sorin Hall is one hun- 
dred and forty-four feet by one hundred and 
twelve feet, and contains the law lecture room, 
the court room, the law library, and is also 
used as a dormitory for the students in the ad- 
vanced classes. Science Hall is one hundred 
and four feet by one hundred and thirty-one 
feet, divided into two compartments, and is re- 
plete with every appliance for the successful and 



SOUTH BEND. 



71 



comprehensive study of modern science, and 
Mechanics' Hall, which is equipped fully with all 
implements and tools essential to the acquire- 
ment of technology. The Astronomical Obser- 
vatory comprises a revolving dome, telescope, 
transit instrument and computing rooms in 
which are smaller instruments and reference 
works of great value. The Infirmary building 
is two hundred feet Dy forty-live feet, and is 
fully supplied with every accessory required by 
such a needed institution, and has a full corps 
physicians and nurses in constant attendance. 

In 188S Father fcjorin celebrated the fiftieth 
anniversary of his elevation to the priesthood. 
In May, 1891, he made his last journey 10 
Europe. He was accompanied by Father Zahm, 
but he did not remain long, and in 1S92 he visit- 



with the progressive spirit of the institution and 
of its venerable and honored founder. Under 
Father Morrissey's administration the grand 
work projected by his predecessors has been 
carried to successful completion He has added 
a number of new and progressive studies to the 
curriculum of the college, not the least of which 
is a department of journalism which is most 
ably conducted by capable professors and which 
involves most careful and progressive mental 
training. Washington Hall has been beautifully 
frescoed, and additional wings have been erected 
at Sorin Hall, while a magnificent gymnasium 
two hundred and forty feet by one hundred feet 
has been erected. This building was destroyed 
by fire in 1900, but the energetic management of 
the university at once rebuilt it and it is now 
a much better equipped building than the origi- 









































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VIEW ACROSS ST 

ed the Atlantic coast for the uenefit of his fail- 
ing health. In Februaiy, 1893, he entered upon 
the eightieth year of his noble life, but death 
came to him before its close, and his gentle 
spirit passed away on the 31st day of October. 
Father Walsh also died this year. In the spring 
he visited Texas on his return from France, 
and at the close of the season he went to Wis- 
consin to seek health and relief, but death 
came to him on July 17th, and his great earthly 
labors were ended. Father Andrew Morrissey, 
the seventh president and present directing 
head of Notre Dame, was selected for this ex- 
alted position by the expressed wish of his pre- 
decessor, Father Walsh, and by the desire of 
Father Sorin, the founder of the university, and 
the entire faculty. Father Morrissey had been 
identified with Notre Dame since he was a boy 
twelve years of age, and was thoroughly imbued 



. TOSEVn'S LAKE. 

nal. Father Morrissey has also erected an addi • 
tional hall for students dormitories, and has per- 
fected plans for a handsome new fire proof 
building for library purposes. The college 
grounds embrace an area of 900 acres and are 
most beautifully laid out, while the natural 
beauties of the location are unsurpassed. The 
present enrollment of students at the University 
is 800, and the faculty numbers nearly seventy 
professors and brothers all highly versed in the 
various branches of study under their charga. 
The board of trustees is composed of Rev. John 
A. Zahm, C. S. O, president; Rev. Daniel E. 
Hudson, C. S. C, Rev. William R. Connor, C. 
S. C, Rev. Andrew Morrissey, C. S. C, and Rev. 
James J. French, C. S. C, secretary. Brother 
Edward, who died in January, 1901, was also a 
member of the board. The present executive 
officers of the university are: Rev. Andrew 
Morrissey, C. 3. O, president; Rev. James J. 



S O U T H BEND. 



French, C. S. C. vice-president and director of 
studies; Rev. Martin J. Regan, C. S. C. prefect 
of discipline; Brother Paul, C. S. C, secretary, 
and Brother Joseph, C. S. C, assistant secretary. 
Among the prominent buildings connected 
with the institution are Holy Cross Hall, Sorin 
Hall, Corby Hall, Brownson Hall, Carroll Hall, 
St. Joseph Hall, St. Edward's Hall and Bishops 
.Memorial Hall. Since 1SS3 Prof. J. F. Edwards, 
the director of the Bishops Memorial Hall, has 
been engaged in founding the Catholic Archives 
of America, and building an extensive Catholic 
reference library. Thousands of volume* 
pamphlets and manuscripts have already been 
collected, and connected with the Memorial 
Hall is a magnificent museum containing an 
exhaustive and most valuable collection of sou- 
venirs of historic interest, and a gallery of his- 
torical portraits unequalled anywhere in the 
United States. The golden jubilee of the Uni- 
versity was celebrated with imposing and 
elaborate ceremonies on June 11, 12, 13, 1895, 
and was an event long to be remembered. The 
Notre Dame exhibit at the World's Columbian 
exposition in Chicago was acknowledged to be 
Uie greatest educational exhibit of that great ex- 
position It was under the direction of Prof. 
Edwards and attracted great attention Notre 
Dame was also honored in 1894 by the holding 



the first American Eucharist Congress within 
its walls. The following is a list of the presidents 
and vice-presidents of Notre Dame since its in- 
ception in 1842: Presidents: Father Edward 
Sorin, founder, 1842-1865; Father Patrick Dil- 
lon. 1S65-1866; father William Corby, 1866- 
IxTU; Father Augustus Lemonnier, 1S72-1874; 
Father Patrick J. Colovin, J.S74-1877; Father 
William Corby, 1877-1881; Father Thomas E. 
Walsh, 1881-1893, and Father Andrew Morrissey, 
since 1893. Vice-presidents: Fathers Alexis 
Granger, 1844-1851; Francis Cointet, 1851-1852; 
Richard Shortis, 1S52-1S56; Neil H. Gillespie, 
1S56-1S5S; Patrick Dillon, 1858-1859; William 
Corby. 1865-1866; Augustus Lemonnier, 1866- 
1872; Michael B. Brown, 1872-1874; J.M.Toohey, 
and P. J. Colovin, 1874-1875; John A. O'Connell, 
1875-1876; John A. Zahni. 1S76-1877; Thomas 
E. Walsh, 1877-1881; Charles Kelley and J. 
M. Toohey. 1881-1882; J. M. Toohey, 1882-1885; 
John A. Zahm. 1885-1886; Andrew Morrissey, 
1SS6-1S87; John A. Zahm. 1887-1891; Andrew 
Morissey, 1891-1893; James J. French, since 
1893 With such a foundation and such a 
history the future of Notre Dame University is 
fraught with brilliant promise as the leading 
institution in America dedicated to the cause ot 
Christian education. 




FOUNDING OF NOTRE DAME. 



SlO U T H BEND. 



73 



Very Rev. Edward Sorin, C. S. C. 



The Very Rev. Edward Sorin, whose genius 
and piety, and whose self-sacrifice and untir- 
ing efforts were the inspiration and the ruling 
forces of the great institution, was the honored 
founder of the University of Notre Dame, and 
for twenty-three years was its president and 
ruling spirit. At the time of his lamented death, 



came pronounced in the man and firmly fixed 
in the priest. When twenty-six years of age 
Father sorin attached himself to the Congrega- 
tion of the Holy Cross, a religious society 
then recently estaDlished at Mans, Prance, by 
Father Moreau, for the instruction of youth, 
and the preaching of missions to the people, 




POUNDER OF Nil IKK DAME. 



which occurred October 31, 1893, he was the 
Superior General of the Congregation of the 
Holy Cross, under whose auspices the Univer- 
sity was founded and flourished. Father Sorin 
was born in Ahuille, near Laval, France, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1814. Studious from childhood, he 
early formed those habits that afterward be- 



and he soon became one of its most earnest 
workers. On May 27, 1838, Father Sorin was 
elevated to the priesthood, and shortly after- 
ward he was requested by the Bishop of Vin- 
cennes to establish a branch of the order in 
America. In August, 1841, therefore, accom- 
panied by six brothers of the Congregation, 



74 



SOUTH BEND 



all of whom are now deceased, he sailed from 
France and landed in New York September 13, 
on tne eve of the anniversary of the exaltation 
of the Holy Cross. In 1830 Rev. Theodore 
Badin, the first priest ordained in the United 
States, had purchased trom the Government 
"St. Mary's of the Lakes," a portion of the 
present Notre Dame. Here he had dwelt in 
the lone wilderness teaching and preaching 
to the Indians and a few whites, but the mis- 
sion was finally abandoned. Some time after- 
ward this land was offered by the Bishop of 
Vincennes to the Congregation of the Holy 
Cross on the condition that it would erect and 
maintain a college there. Even at that time, 
and although but a mission in the wilderness, 
this location impressed Father Sorin with its 
beauty and grandeur as no other site had done, 
and he accepted the site and took possession 
of it on November 27, 1842, more than a year 
after landing in America. He soon reclaimed 
the abandoned mission of Father Baden, and 
with the aid of the Catholic settlers he cleared 
a portion of the ground and erected a church 
building of hewn timber forty by twenty feet 
and two stories in height. The services were 
held in the upper floor, while the first served 
as a dwelling place tor the young priest, and 
this was the only church or chapel possessed 
by the Catholics of South Bend and its vicinity. 
Filled with enthusiasm, Father Sorin deter- 
mined to establish the promised college, and 
he changed the name to "Notre Dame du Lac." 
After months of hard labor the corner-stone 
of the first college was laid August 2S, 1S43, 
and before winter was under roof. In June, 
the following year, it was fully completed and 
the few students were transferred to the new 
structure. The first commencement exercises 
took place in this primitive institution in Au- 
gust, 1844. Prior to this, through the aid of 
Hon. John D. Defrees, a charter was granted 
to the college with all the rights and privileges 
of a university, and Father Sorin became its 
first president, which office he held until 1865, 
with Father Granger as his first and Father 
Cointet as his second vice president. Father 



Sorin laid deeply and solidly the foundation 
of the institution, and the present massive 
and magnificent buildings which adorn the 
grounds are enduring monuments to his mem- 
ory and a lasting tribute to his genius and 
untiring zeal and energy. The first college 
building was eighty by thirty-six feet and 
four stories high, but it soon became too 
small, and in 1853 two wings forty by sixty 
feet were added, and this, although deemed 
adequate at the time, in 1865, gave place to 
an imposing edifice one hundred and sixty by 
eighty feet, and six stories in height. On 
April 23, 1879, this handsome building, and 
nearly all the others surrounding it, were de- 
stroyed by fire, but undismayed and undiscour- 
aged, Father Sorin and his able assistants 
at once began the rebuilding of Notre Dame, 
and this great university is now known 
wherever civilization exists. During his long 
life Father Sorin never left the institution for 
any length of time. He made many pilgrimages 
to Rome, but his heart was always at Notre 
Dame, and he ever longed for his return to his 
loved university. He was elected Provincial 
of the order August 15, 1865, and on the 22d 
of July, 1868, the General Chapter of the Order, 
in session at Rome, confered upon him the 
honor of Superior General, which exalted office 
he held until his death. One of the brightest 
events in Father Sorin's life was the celebra 
tion of tne golden jubilee of his elevation to 
the priesthood, which occurred August 15, 1888, 
having been deferred from May 27. It was 
observed with great splendor, and was attended 
by Cardinal Gibbons, two Archbishops, eleven 
Bishops and scores of prominent priests and 
laymen. For more than two years prior to 
his death Father Sorin had been in poor 
health, but his demise was a shock to the 
community and his countless friends, and on 
the morning of the 31st of October, 1893, sur- 
rounded by the priests and brothers, this noble 
man and great teacher, the founder of Notre 
Dame peacefully breathed his last and his 
spirit took its flight into the great unknown. 



SOUTH BEND 



75 



Very Rev. William Corby, C. S. C. 



The Very Rev. William Corby, C. S. C, was 
the third president o£ the University of Notre 
Dame, serving from 1866 to 1872, and who 
was again called to the presidency in 1877 
and served until 1881, was a powerful factor 
in the progress and advancement of this noble 
institution, and was afterward Provincial of 



Notre Dame during the scholastic year 1852- 
1853. He had no thought of entering the min- 
istry when he came here, but impressed with 
the deep religious atmosphere of the place, he 
resolved, with Divine help, to devote his life 
to the cause of Christian education. In 1854 
he entered the Congregation of the Holy Cross, 




VERY REV. WILLIAM CORBY, C. S. C. 



the Congregation of the Holy Cross in America. 
Father Corby was born in Detroit, Mich., in 
1833. His father, Daniel Corby, was born in 
Kings County, Ireland, and came to America 
when a young man. Father Corby attended 
the district schools, and under private tutors, 
and was afterward sent to the University of 



and vigorously prosecuted his theological 
studies until 1858, when he made his religious 
profession and was maae Prefect of Discipline. 
He continued his studies until 1860, when he 
was ordained to the priesthood. He was then 
engaged as a professor in the univeisity until 
July of the following year, when he was ap- 



76 



SOUTH BEND. 



pointed director of the Manual Labor School, 
with the additional duty of attending the Mis- 
sion of South Bend, which was too small to en- 
gage a regular pastor, and which afterward be- 
came St. Patrick's Churcn. when the rebellion 
occurred Father Corby volunteered his services 
to the famous Iiish Brigade, of New York, and 
was appointed cnapiain in 1862. He served with 
the brigade for three years, ana was with the 
gallant Army of the Potomac under all its 
great commanders, from McClellan to Grant. 
One of the most sublime incidents during that 
memorable struggle was that of Father Corby 
giving absolution to the soldiers of the Irish 
Brigade before going into battle on the famous 
field of Gettysburg. And when every man was 
upon his knees, and the chaplain, stretching 
his hand toward the brigade, pronounced the 
words of absolution, the scene was awe inspir- 
ing and deeply impressive. After the war 
Father Corby was for a few months in charge 
of St. Patrick's congregation. He raised the 
debt of the church, built the parochial resi- 
dence, and was the first Catholic clergyman 
that ever resided in this city. During the 
year 1865 he was appointed vice president 
and director of studies at Notre Dame, and 
in 1S66 was made president. At that time 
there v. as an indebtedness of $97,000.00 to be 
paid, and a new building to be finished, and 
in less than five years the entire debt was 
liquidated and $S0,000.00 expended for material 
improvements. He founded the Notre Dame 
Scholastic, which is still the official journal 
of tne institution, and laid out the extensive 
college grounds to prepare for the mammoth 
buildings which he foresaw would be necessary 
in the future. A number of new departments 
were added to the college, and in 1868 a 



General Chapter of the Order of the Holy 
Cross, held in Home, elected Father Corby 
Provincial for the United States, in place of 
Very Rev. Father Sorin, who was elected 
Superior Geneial of the order throughout the 
world, 'ihese two offices he held until 1872, 
when be was selected to establish another 
uianch of the order at Watertown, Wis. And 
aner founding tne Coaege of the Sacred 
Heart and erecting one of the largest churches 
in the state, Father Corby, in 1877, was again 
eiected piesident of Notre Dame, and for the 
second time Provincial of the Hoiy Order. He 
was the president on April 23, 1879, when the 
grand old college and many other buildings 
were reduced to ashes and many priceless 
treasures of art and science were destroyed. 
He it was who, witn the same courage of war 
times, at once set to work in rebuilding the 
college, and in September of the same year 
the class rooms in the new college were open 
for the reception of students and a new era 
of prosperity was opened for the institution. 
Father Corby was presment until 1881, when 
he was again called to Watertown, and in 1885 
he was, for the third time, selected as Provin- 
cial of the order. He held this office until 1S92, 
when the General Chapter re-elected him Pro- 
vincial Superior of the United States and First 
Assistant Superior General of the entire world. 
Father Corby was one of the most genial and 
most determined of men, and was devotedly 
attached to the society ot which he was so 
distinguished a member, and his death, which 
occurred in 1898, was a severe loss to the 
order, and was deeply mourned by all who had 
known and loved the honored father during 
his noble and useful lire. 



Very Rev. Andrew Morrissey, C. S. C. 



The Very. Rev. Andrew Morrissey, C. S. O, 
the present most able and progressive presi- 
dent ot the University of Notre Dame, has 
been connected with mat prominent institution 
of learning since 1872, and enjoyed the warm 
friendship and esteem of all his predecessors 
in that most distinguished office. Father Mor- 
rissey is a native of Ireland, and was born in 
Thomastown, County Kilkenny, in I860. His 
father was Thomas Morrissey, a landed pro- 
prietor in that section of the country, and was 
well known, and his mother was Mary (Mur- 
phy) Morrissey. He is related to the well- 
known Morrissey family of Dublin, who at- 



tained prominence as clergymen, teachers ana 
soldiers, and his maternal uncles were direc- 
tors in the academies at Fort Wayne ana 
Latayette, Ind. Young Morrissey early attend- 
ed the schools of the Diocese of Ossory, at his 
native place, and at the age of twelve years 
came to America and entered the academical 
department at Notre Dame. He was a close 
student and apt scholar, and early gave evi- 
dence of strong oratorical power. His favorite 
studies were philosophy and languages, and 
he was the first scholar in his class, and its 
orator. He graduated in 1879, and then became 
a theological student in the same institution. 



SOUTH BEND 



77 



He was ordained a priest in 1883, when he was 
but twenty-three years o£ age, and then was 
engaged in teaching at Notre Dame. He aft- 
erward taught with great success at the Sacred 
Heart College at Watertown, Wis., and was 
the first vice president of the college when he 
was selected by Very Rev. Father Sorin, who 
was deeply interested in the young man, to go 



this year, while traveling in Europe, he was 
summoned home by the venerable Very Rev. 
Father Corby, who informed him that it was 
the sincere wish of Father Walsh, and of th? 
founder and faculty, that he should assume 
the distinguished office of president of Notre 
Dame, then vacant by reason of the death of 
Father Walsh, who had been its president 




VERY REV. ANDREW MORRISSEY, C, S. C. 



to Rome and pursue a higher course of study 
in philosophy, canon and civil law. In 1886 
he was recalled from Rome to take the posi- 
tion of director of studies at Notre uame under 
President Walsh, and was selected as vice 
president of the college. He served in this 
office one year and was again selected ps vice 
president in 1891 and served until 1893. During 



since 1SS1, and under whose wise administra- 
tion Father Morrissey had so ably and ac- 
ceptaDly served. During his administration 
the educational work of the university has 
oeen greatly extended, the courses of study 
have been rearranged and placed upon a high 
scholastic piane. It is but just to say that 
no appointment could have given greater pleas- 



78 



SOUTH BEND. 



lire to the fiiends of the institution than that 
of Father Morrissey. He is thoroughly imbued 
with the spirit of its venerable founder, and 
with the zeal and enthusiasm of his able 
predecessor, and no more gifted mind could 
have been selected for the educational control 
of this great institution. Aside from his 
natural endowments and excellent training, 
his social and sympathetic qualities and that 
love of his kind which have won for him the 
deep regard of all who come within the sphere 
of ids influence, are most essential forces in 
his progressive and able management of this 
university. To-day over 800 students are en- 
rolled at the college, a larger number than 
during any previous year, and in every re- 
spect Father Morrisrey has fully justified the 



high opinion and the warm esteem of all who 
have the welfare of this college at heart. 
During his administration Corby Hall, addi- 
tions to Sorin Hall, Washington Hall, the 
present excellent gymnasium, the Natatorium, 
the new Boiler house, Mt. St. Vincent 
Home and other notable and enduring ad- 
ditions to the college have been built, and 
Father Morrissey trusts that ere long a splen- 
did new fire-proof library building will be 
erected as a fitting repository for the priceless 
literary collections and accumulations of over 
half a century. Modest, retiring, but withal 
firm and progressive. Father Morrissey is the 
ideal college president, and his great worth _o 
Notre Dame is known and gratefully acknowl- 
edged by all. 




VIEW OF THE CAMPUS, LOOKING WEST. 



SOUTH BEND. 



79 



St. Mary's Academy. 



ONE of the noblest, most extensive and 
best equipped among the institutions de- 
voted to the great cause of Christian edu- 
cation in the highest sense is St. Mary's Aca- 
demy, which for nearly half a century under the 
beneficent direction of Divine providence, and 
the self sacrificing efforts of the Sisters of the 



womanhood known throughout the world as the. 
Sisters of the Holy Cross, and under their wise 
and progressive management it has become one 
of the greatest Catholic educational institutions 
of the western continent, with missions and 
branches in almost every state in the union. 
The Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy 




THE CHAPEL AT ST. MARY S. 



Holy Cross has prospered and developed until 
today it has no superior among the many pro- 
gressive educational institutions for young 
women and girls, in the United States, conducted 
under high religious auspices. St. Mary's 
Academy owes its origin and wonderful ad- 
vancement to that noble order of Catholic 



Cross was established in 1S41. in Le Mans 
France, by the great Abbe Moreau, who was 
also the founder of the Congregation of the 
Brothers of the Holy Cross, of which Very Rev. 
Edward Sorin, the founder of the University of 
Notre Dame was one of its earliest and most 
earnest members. In 1844 the first mission or 





i 






SOUTH BEND 



81 



academy of the Sisters of the Holy Cross was 
established in America, at Bertrand, Michigan, 
and the order may be said to have had it? 
American foundation at that time. From this 
initial point the sisters of this great missionary 
order were sent out among the Indians and 
the white pioneers in this western wilderness 
to spread the cause of education and the saving 
truths of Christian religion. During the first 
ten years of its existance the order expanded 
and missions were established in New York, 
New Orleans. Mishawaka and Lowell. In 1855 
St. Mary's Academy was duly incorporated by 
the General Assembly of Indiana, and the nu- 
cleus of the present extensive institution was 
formed. Under the te.rms of the charter the 
pui pose of the incorporators was declared to be: 



beauties of nature with that atmosphere of per- 
fect quiet and arcadian seclusion which are 
unfailing incentives to study and reflection. 
St. Mary's thus became the Mother House of the 
order in the United States. In 1857 the union 
of temporal interests between St. Mary's and 
Notre Dame was officially severed and since that 
time a separate administration has been main- 
tained, though by special Pontiflcial privilege, 
the Very Rev. Edward Sorin, continued during 
his noble life to act as ecclesiastical Superior 
over both congregations, the Brothers and 
Sisters of the Holy Cross. The spacious and 
beautifully laid out grounds of the academy com- 
prise about one hundred and fifty acres, and 
the surrounding scenery is at once grand and 
impressive. Mother Mary Angela was the guid- 




ST. MARY S ACADEMY. 



"To establish an academy of learning for the ed- 
ucation of young ladies in the various branches 
of art and sciences usually taught in female 
academies of the highest standing, and to confer 
such degrees upon scholars as are usual in such 
Institutions." The same year the community 
removed from Bertrand and was located upon its 
present grounds near South Bend, and about 
one mile from the University of Notre Dame. 
The site for the erection of the new buildings 
of St. Mary's Academy was selected and set 
apait by the Very Rev. Edward Sorin. and it is 
a beautiful eminence overlooking the romantic 
St. Joseph river, whose picturesque banks are 
still covered with magnificent forest trees. It 
is an adeal location for a scholastic and religious 
institution, combining as it does, the rarest 



ing spirit of this institution from its inception 
in Bertrand until her widely lamented death 
which occurred in 1887, and she was made 
Provincial of the Order, afterward Mother Supe- 
rior, and at her death was Mistress of Novices 
at St. Mary's. Her great faculties and holy 
energies were ever exercised in its behalf, and it 
was to her great personality and untiring de- 
votion that this noble academy has grown and 
flourished, and today enjoys its proud eminence 
among the institutions of religion and learning 
in the new world. Mother Angela was imbued 
with the highest religious aspirations and en- 
dowed with mental gifts of rare excellence. 
She was especially adapted for the high and 
sacred offices in the Order of the Holy Cross for 
which she was selected, and ever brought to her 



SOUTH BEND. 



83 



responsible and holy duties the highest stand- 
ards of excellence and faculties that would hav? 
won high renown for her in any sphere of in- 
tellectual and social activity to which she might 
have been called. Never content with medi- 
ocrity, her instructors were all qualified for their 
important duties by a long and thorough service 
in a scholastic novitiate, superintended by ex- 
perts in the various branches of study. In every 
instance she adopted for her schools and acad- 
emies of the Holy Cross the courses of study 
most valuable, and in greatest demand in 
America and by these means has built up an in- 
stitution, which, while not departing from 
ancient tenets, is essentially and progressively 
American. The heroic services of Mother An- 
gela during the civil war cannot be too highly 
extolled During that desperate struggle 
Mother Angela organized an army hospital ser- 
vice of the highest efficiency and accompanied 
by a number of Sisters from St. Mary's she de 
voted herself heroically to the nursing of the 
sick and wounded soldiers of both contending 
armies, and her noble services received universal 
and grateful recognition. The course of edu- 
cation at St. Mary's is of the most practical and 
comprehensive character. Here the heart as 
well as the mind is carefully trained, and its 
graduates go forth into the world to grace so- 
ciety with their accomplishments and to honor 
and edify it by their virtues. Every attention 
is given to the moral and religious culture of the 
pupils, and their general deportment is equally 
the subject of unremitting care. Knowing that 
the charm of refined manners is the aggregate 
of habits acquired in youth, the teachers pav 
especial attention to deportment and the schol- 
ars are taught to ever use their resources of 
knowledge, reason and wit with good taste and 
sound judgment. Although a Catholic institu- 
tion, St. Mary's welcomes to its halls pupils of 
every religious denomination, and anything like 
an attempt to force the religious convictions of 
those not of Catholic faith is strictly and scru- 
pulously avoided. As the result of this, of the 
two hundred students at present at this academy 
fully one hundred of them are not members 
of the Catholic church. The extensive and 
handsome academy buildings are of cream color- 
ed brick, ornamented with stone, and in every 
respect are admirably adapted for the uses of 
this progressive educational institution. The 
study halls, class rooms and sleeping apartments 
are all well lighted and ventilated, and every 
arrangement is made for the comfort and care 
of the students who make their home within its 
walls during the school year. The course of 
studies provides for a thorough training in the 
various branches required for a liberal educa- 
tion from the elementary work to the higher 



studies of the advanced course, and in every de- 
partment the best methods both practical and 
theoretical have been adopted. Each depart- 
ment is turn shea with a special library of 
reference books and the general library of the 
academy contains over seven thousand volumes 
embracing the best autnors in history, science, 
biography, travel, poetry, essays and fiction. 
Current literature also forms an important part 
of the Senior's reading room. The academy 
also possesses a large and comprehensive mu- 
seum of natural history, and the mineralogical 
cabinets contain rare botanical, zoological, 
mineralogical and geological specimens, and a 
fine assortment of fossils, illustrative of the 
different geological ages. In the physical cabi 
net !s a collection of instruments from the best 
manufacturers of Europe, the electrical appara- 
tus includes an effective dynamo, and there arc- 
also various instruments used in Roentgen X ray 
experiments, in pneumatics, hydrostatics and 
hydro-dynamics. The chemical laboratory is 
equipped with every apparatus for laboratory 
work in the fundamental laws of chemistry, 
and for the study of the characteristic reaction, 
of the metal as well as the principles of 
chemical analysis. In addition to these there 
is a. fine anatomical cabinet, comprising all that 
is needed to facilitate the proper study of physi- 
ology Particular attention is here paid to 
physical culture, and the beautiful and splendid- 
ly equipped gymnasium of the academy is under 
the management of an expert, a graduate from 
the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics. Here 
the exercises are adapted not only to the general 
requirements, but to the particular needs of each 
student. Music and the fine arts also receive 
especial attention, and one of the academy build- 
in s-h is entirely devoted to music, with large 
halls for vocal classes, and a number of rooms 
with musical instruments for daily practice and 
lessons. All branches of music are taught on 
the plans of the best classical conservatories 
and under the direction of able teachers in both 
the vocal and instrumental departments. In 
drawing and painting the principles that have 
formed the basis of instructions in all the great 
art schools of Europe, are embodied in this 
course at the academy, and the adaptations of 
these principles to the capacity of even the 
youngest students has been the labor of years. 
Every department of this great institution is 
under the direction and supervision of Sisters 
of the Holy Cross who are especially adapted 
by training, knowledge and inclination for the 
responsible duties devolving upon them, aifl 
it may be truthfully said that no institution pos- 
sesses greater facilities for imparting a 
thorough, useful and artistic education than does 
St. Mary's Academy of Notre Dame. This great 



SOUTH BEND 



85 



institution is now under the gentle but able 
administration of Mother Pauline, who, since 
1895, has been in charge ot the educational de- 
partments of this more than excellent academy. 
One of the architectural and religious features 
ol St. Mary s is the beautiful cnapel of Our Lady 
of Loreto, which is matchless in architecture 
and Romanesque in design. This exquisite 
chapel was designed by Father Sorin and was 
erected in 1858. It is a facsimile of the Holy 
House in Italy. The windows of stained glass, 
of marvelous design and coloring are from Le 
Mans, Fiance, and the magnificent "Stations 
of the Cross" upon the walls, are from the 
hands of a Sister of St. Mary's who died ere 
her task was fully completed. It is surmounted 
by a beautiful dome which can be seen at a 
great distance, while its marble altars, shrines, 
and pious statues are the gifts of former pupils 
in whose hearts still Durns the love of their 
Alma Mater, St. Mary's Academy. In connection 
with the academy there is also a convent where 
nearly two hundred sisters of the Holy Cross 
are entered, and here the aged and worn 
sisters come to spend their declining years amid 
the holy influences and peaceful scenes of this 
beautiful home Here too are infirmaries for 
the care of the sick sisters and also for such 
students as may require the care of skillful 
nurses and able physicians In every depart- 
ment St. Mary's Academy is a model of its 
kind, and since its establishment in Bertrand, 



Michigan, in 1844, nearly fifty noble missions 
have been founded in almost every section of 
the country under its fostering care. Magnifi- 
cent hospitals have been erected and numerous 
parochial scnools attest the zeal of the order to 
promote the physical and mental welfare of the 
children of the poor. One of the most attractive 
publications, and one especially designed to ele- 
vate the literary standard of St. Mary's, to cul- 
tivate the tastes of the pupils and to act as an 
impetus to earnest efforts in the English classes, 
is the delightful monthly journal published at 
the institution under the attractive title of "St. 
Mary's Chimes." In addition to the excellent 
poems and essays of the students, its columns 
contain the reports of the pupils who receive 
certificates of excellence in conduct and in the 
various branches of study, and .terns of a general 
nature of interest to the pupils and their 
parents. Most ably edited and of most attrac- 
tive appearance "St. Mary's Chimes" is not only 
an excellent literary journal but also serves as 
an authentic record of the school work not only 
for the current month, but for the entire year. 
From the wonderful achievements of the past, 
the future of St. Mary's and of the Sisters of 
the Holy Cross is full of brilliant promise, and 
each succeeding year will crown with enduring 
laurels the brows of the noble women of this 
Order who have devoted their lives to the great 
cause of religion ?.nd education. 





THE HEXXEFIN OAK. KIVEHVIEW CEMETERY. 



SOUTH BEND 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



HUN. THUS. S. STANFIELI). 

One of the most learned jurists of Indiana, 
a lawyer of rare ability and prominence, and 
a citizen of public spirit and great usefulness 
passed away in the death of the Hon. Thomas 
Stilwell Stanfleld, who died in this city Sep- 
tember 12, 18S5. Judge Stanfleld, as he was 
more popularly known, was one of the leaders 
of the Indiana bar, and a judge who was in 
every sense the embodiment of an ideal jurist 
His value to South Bend is immeasurable and 
his memory is still cherished by all who knew 
and honored him while he lived and labored 




HON. TIIOS. S. STANFIELD. 

for the good of his fellow men. Judge Stan- 
field was a native of Ohio and was born in Lo- 
gan county, in that state, October 17, 1816. His 
father, William Stanfleld, was a native of 
Tennessee, and his mother was a Virginian. 
They settled in Ohio when it was scarcely 
more than a wilderness, leaving there for the 
"Great St. Joseph Valley" in 1830, stopping for 
the winter at Young's Praiiie, Michigan, and 
coming to South Bend in the spring of 1831 



There were but few houses in this section of 
the state when Judge Stanfleld, who was fii- 
teen years of age, first attended school here to 
Elisha Egbert, a struggling young lawyer, who 
afterward became Judge of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas. He had previously attended 
school in Ohio. Young Stanfleld first worked 
In a saw mill located on the bank of Wengers 
Creek, near where it empties into the St. Jo- 
seph river and afterward worked for his father 
at brick making in the northern part of the 
city. He then engaged as a clerk in the gen- 
eral store of L. M. Taylor, and many of the 
customers were the Indians who then resided 
in this vicinity. After due consideration he 
decided to study law, and became a student in 
the office of Hon. Samuel C. Sample, a leading 
lawyer, and who was the first member of Con- 
gress from the Ninth District of Indiana. He 
attended a law school in Cincinnati, 0., riding 
on horseback from South Bend for that pur- 
pose. This was in 1839-1840 and here he met 
Miss Nancy Peebles the young lady who be- 
came his wife a year later. He was genial, 
able, courteous and thorough and soon ac- 
quired a large practice. In 1849 he was nomi- 
nated for Lieutenant Governor against Gen- 
eral James H. Lane, and the two candidates 
made the canvas of the state together. Judge 
Stanfleld was defeated although he ran 10,000 
votes ahead of his ticket. Prior to this, how- 
ever, in 1844, he had served as Representative 
in the legislature and was again elected repre- 
sentative in 1851. In 1858 he was again elect- 
ed over ex-Sheriff S. L. Cottrell. In 1852, on 
his return from the legislature, he was selected 
Judge of the Circuit Court, being then but 36 
years of age. His circuit consisted of eleven 
counties which he visited with horse and bug- 
gy twice a year, there being no railroads. In 
1873 he was defeated for the judgeship by his 
warm personal friend, Judge Noyes. Wnen 
South Bend was incorporated as a city Judge 
Stanfleld was very active in public affairs and 
served several terms in the City Council. 
During the war of the rebellion he was an ar- 
dent patriot. He assisted in the organization 
of the troops and was one of Governor Mor- 
ton's most valuable advisers in this section of 
the state. He was commissioned by Governor 
Morton to secure the names of all eligible for 



88 



SOUTH BEND 



military service iu the county and to take 
charge of Camp Rose in this city. He was 
Offered Uie commission 01 ooiouei, wnich He 
uecnned, not ih.aK.ng himse.f capable of com- 
manding a regiment. Judge Stanfield was 
deeply interested and an important factor in 
securing railroad facilities for this city. He 
was the president and afterward director of 
and attorney tor the Grand Trunk Railioad 
Company, and he was instrumental .n the pur- 
chase oi tne entite ngiu oi way 01 the i^aite 
Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad Com- 
pany from White P.geon, Mich., to Laporte, 
ind., and was a director of that company for 
years. He also performed a like service for 
the Michigan Central Railroad and was a 
director and attorney of the company for 
years. His death was a great loss to the city. 
During his life h'e had ever been active in ad- 
vancing its interests in educational, commer- 
cial, manuiacturmg and religious affairs, and 
no one performed gi eater service in behalf of 
the city than did Judge Stanheld. He was a 
man oi the people and a leader of all. In re- 
ligion ne was a Presbyterian, but all church- 
men were his ir.ends, and the late Father 
Sorin, of Notre Dame, was his warmest frienu 
from the time of Father Sorin's arrival here. 
He was quiet and modest, but forceful and 
progressive, and tus influence was felt in every 
movement in wnich ne was engaged. Mrs. 
Stanfield died in 1S96. Judge Stanfield is ably 
represented by his two sons, Edward P., and 
Howard S. Stanfield, who are prominent man- 
ufacturers and citizens of South Bend. A 
daughter, Mrs. M. B. Staley, died about two 
yeais ago, and another daughter died in 1866, 
when she was but six years old. The pall bearers 
at Judge Stanfieid's funeral were Hon. John 
Reynolds, Clem Stuaebaker, Andrew Ander- 
son, E. S. Reynolds, A. G. Cushing, Geo. W. 
Matthews and De Foe Skinner. At a public- 
meeting held in the court house the following 
resolution was adopted: '-Resolved, That in 
his demise South Bend loses a valuable, en- 
terprising public spirited citizen; that society 
loses a man of gen.ai aid companionable in- 
stincts, cultured and refined, whose mind was 
stored with many of the richest gifts of legal 
and literary lore; that the legal fraternity 
loses a man who was an ornament to his nigh 
calling, whose judicial career was character- 
ized by dignity, ability and fairness, and finaliy 
the church loses a warm friend and earnest 
supporter, and the cause of temperance and 
morality an earnest advocate." The City 
Council in a memorial pronounced him "An 
ornament to the community in which he lived, 
and the world was the better for his having 
been in it." 



HORATIO CHAPIN. 
One of the earliest settlers in South Bend and 
one of its most highly honored and esteemed 
citizens was Mr. Horatio Chapin, whose deeply 
lamented death occurred in this city on May 
13. 1871. Mr. Chapin was one of the most force- 
ful workers for the good of mankind, and for 
the upbuilding of the lives and characters of 
the young people of this city, and he was one 
of the most earnest advocates of the Sunday 
school known to local history. Mr. Chapin 
was a native of Massachusetts, and was born 
in Bernardstown, in that state, in 1803. His 
parents were of that sturdy christian New 
England stock, which builded strongly the 
foundations of the republic, and early taught 




HORATIO CHAPIN. 

the lessons of christian fortitude. In 1S22 Mr 
Chapin came to Detroit, where he remained 
until 1831, when he decided to come to South 
Bend, then but a meager settlement of a few 
hundred people. He rode an Indian pony 
and followed an Indian trail on his journey 
here. He realized the great natural advan- 
tages of the location and believed in the future 
growth of the hustling village on the banks of 
the St. Joseph river. He brought with him a 
stock of goods and at once opened a general 
store, on Michigan street near Water street, 
which commanded success from the outset. 
Mr. Chapin had the distinction of shipping 
the first cargo of wheat down the St. Joseph 
river on its way to the city of Buffalo. Imme- 
diately on his arrival here he began to interest 
the parents of the children in the organization 



SOUTH BEND 



89 



of a Sunday school and was the first superin- 
tendent to conduct the school. Although meet- 
ing but indifferent success at the commence- 
ment of his labors, he persevered, and through 
trials and disappointments and the luke- 
warm support of his neighbors he continued 
his efforts until they were crowned with suc- 
cess and the Sunday school in South Bend be- 
came a fixed and permanent institution. He 
was also one of the organizers of the Presby- 
terian church in this city, one of its original 
members and an officer in the church until his 
death. From his interest in the spiritual wel- 
fare of the child: en he won the honored titie 
of the "Pioneer of tne Sunday school in St. 
Joseph County." In 1838 the South Bend 
branch of the State Bank of Indiana was estab- 
lished and Mr. ohapin was selected as its mana- 
ger and cashier. Under his able control of its 
affairs the bank grew steadily and became one 
of the leading financial institutions of its time. 
Mr. Chapin continued his connection with the 
bank for twenty years and was one of the most 
progressively conservative bank managers. In 
1862 he went to Chicago, where he assisted 
in establishing the banking house of Chapin, 
Wheeler & Co., with wh ch he remained for 
about three years, when he retired from active 
business and leturned to South Bend, where he 
made his home until his death. He was a man 
of rare culture, a close student and a quick ob- 
server, and was well read in the science of 
medicine, in finance, in theology, in horticul- 
ture and in natural science. He was a man of 
great decision of character, and with the firm- 
ness of the puritan he manfully sustained his 
principles and his convictions. His influence 
was ever exerted for morality, intelligence and 
religion, and he was ever foremost in every 
work that promised the advancement and the 
higher development of mankind. His business 
life was marked by the strictest integrity and 
a high regard for the ethics of commercial 
honor. Believing in the future growth of 
South Bend Mr. Chapin invested largely in 
local real estate which has since become quite 
valuable, and Chapin Park formed a part of his 
estate. Mr. Chapin was married to Miss Martha 
E. Storey, a sister of Wilbur F. Storey, the 
great editor and newspaper publisher of Chi- 
cago, and had a family of four children, Mrs. 
Mary E. Anderson, wife of Hon. Andrew Ander- 
son, the well known attorney, Mr. Edward P. 
Chapin, of th's city, and Martha and Sarah 
Chapin, both deceased He was beloved by a 
large circle of friends and esteemed by the en- 
tire community, who sincerely mourned his 
loss, and his funeral was attended by all the 
clergymen of the city, who knew and appreci- 
ated his long and beneficent service in the cause 
of true religion and morality. 



ALEXIS COQUILLARD. 
No man ever attained greater prominence or 
was more highly esteemed in this city, than 
Mr. Alexis Coquillard, whose lamented death 
occuned at Battle Creek, Mich., on February 
25th, 1890. From his earliest boyhood h s life 
was ever a busy and eventful one, and he had 
much to do in conserving the best interests of 
this city and contributing to its material pro- 
gress and advancement. He came here as a boy 
when this city was practically a straggling 
village and a trading post, and lived to see 
its development into one of the most important 
manufacturing centers of the state and of the 
west. During all these years he was engaged 




ALEXIS COCJUIJiLAHD. 

in active business pursuits, always self-reliant, 
always successful, and the city and its people 
were partakers of his success. Mr. Coquillard 
was born in Detroit, Mich., April 29th, 1825. 
He was the son of Benjamin Coquillard and 
Sophia (Andre) Coquillard, both of French 
descent, and natives of the same city. He was 
a nephew of Alexis Coquillard, who was the 
first white man to come to South Bend, and 
who located here in 1823. In 1829 Mr. Co- 
quillard's father and his family came here, and 
erected a primitive tavern, and the boy Alexis 
made himself useful in various ways, and as 
he advanced in years he traded with the In- 
dians and performed any labor at which he 
might earn an honest return. He was always 
of a saving turn of mind, and laid by some- 
thing from his earnings which some day might 
help to better his condition. When but six- 



90 



SOUTH BEND 



teen years of age a Mr. L. P. Johnson, who was 
the proprietor of a tavern, then located at the 
south-west corner of Michigan and Washing- 
ton streets, constructed a wagon, the first built 
in South Bend, and which attracted general at 
tention. Young Coquillard watched the prog- 
ress of the construction of this wagon w.th 
absorbing interest, and when it was completed 
he induced his mother to purchase it for 
him, and he immediately commenced to haul 
merchandise and other articles from the river 
landing to the few stores then in the village, 
and soon was able to pay the purchase price 
and became the sole owner of the wagon and 
the horses that drew it. It was then that he 
began to seek an education and when the Rev. 
Father Sorin founded the nucleus of the future 
University of Notre Dame, the young boy who 
so cheerfully and energetically lowed him 
across the river in his boat, became his first 
student, and an ambitious one he proved to be. 
At that time Notre Dame College consisted of 
two log houses, and in one of these Alexis 
Coquillard graauated with credit and honor. A 
few years later he persuaded his uncle, Alexis 
Coquillard, the great Indian trader to give 
him an outfit to California, on his agreement 
to divide with him the profits of his labors 
He accordingly left this city in 1849, and after 
nine months of hardy experience in the mines, 
he returned with $4,000, as his earnings. Of 
this he gave his uncle $z,000, and invested his 
portion of it in a farm located in the vicinity 
of "Mosquito Glen," nis parents owning a farm 
to the west of him. He soon found farming 
too slow for his sanguine nature and three 
years later he disposed of it and began buying 
and selling real estate in this vicinity. It was 
in these ventures that he laid the foundation 
for the bulk of his fortune. Soon after he pur- 
chased a saw mill near Lakeville, and became 
the largest manufacturer of lumber in North- 
ern Indiana. During all this time he invested 
his surplus funds in real estate and in 1860 he 
was the largest real estate owner in St. Joseph 
County and accounted its richest man. In 1SC5 
he established the Coquillard Wagon Works, 
which pioved a signal success from the outset 
and which was but one of the numerous enter- 
prises in which he was interested. He erect- 
ed a large number of houses in this city and 
was the owner of more than a hundred build- 
ings, and kept adding to his land purchases 
not only in this county but in the state and ia 
the adjacent states, and was rated as a million- 
aire. But a few years prior to his death he 
purchased over one thousand acres of land on 
the east side of the river, and in 1889 donated 
a large tract to the city for park purposes. 
Mr. Coquillard had grown to be regarded as 



destined to old bachelorhood, and his friends 
had ceased to consider the possibility of his 
marrying, but one evening he attended a 
"Twelfth Night" entertainment at St. Mary's 
Academy, and there he met the estimable lady 
who was destined to become his wife. A pretty 
play was enacted after which the ring cake 
was cut, and who ever secured the ring was 
chosen to enjoy the honors of the evening. 
Miss Maud M. Perley, of Portland, Me., was 
the fortunate lady, and she bore her honors 
in such a modest, yet queenly way, that Mr. 
Coquillard was at once captivated by her grace 
and beauty. Miss Perley was a most attractive 
lady, charming in manner and beautiful In 
person, and withal so sweetly womanly that 
she was the center of attraction. Mr. Coquil- 
lard was successful in his wooing and Miss 
Perley became his bride, and his after years 
were charmed and brightened by her gentle 
ministration of his home. His life was a 
most contented and happy one until his death, 
and his generous nature expanded to its fulness 
under the influence of his domestic peace and 
content. His widow, a most estimable lady, 
survives him and he has left two sons, Alexis, 
and Joseph Alexander, now students at the 
University of Notre Dame, to bear the honored 
name of Coquillard which he dignified and en- 
nobled. His death was regarded as a public 
misfortune and his funeral was attended a! 
most by the entire community who were sin- 
cere mourners at his loss. On the day of the 
funeral the leading industries of the city wer3 
closed, and the ceremonies were solemnly and 
grandly imposing. The active pall bearers 
were Judge T. E. Howard, Joseph D. Oliver, E. 
H. Vanderhoof, Aaron Jones and George H. 
Stover, and the honorary pall bearers were his 
old and honored friends and associates, George 
W. Matthews, J. M. Studebaker, E. S. Reynolds, 
C. A. Kimball, William Miner, A. G. dishing. 
James Oliver, E. Beyerly, John Gallagher, 
John A. Chockelt, Andrew Anderson. T. M. 
Bissell and Hudson Buzby. At the age or 
sixty-five years of honor and usefulness he 
passed to his eternal rest, and the worla was 
the better for his having lived. 



HON. JOHN REYNOLDS. 

The Hon. John Reynolds, whose death oc- 
curred at Terre Coupee Prairie, Ind., March 30, 
1890, was one of the best known and most 
highly esteemed among the early pioneers in 
this section of the state. He was a native of 
Ohio, and was born near Lancaster, in Fairfield 
County, of that state July 12, 1814. His 
parents were natives of Virginia, but removed 
west at an early day. He was the second son 



SOUTH BEND 



01 



of a family of eleven children, of whom all 
are dead with the exception of James Reynolds, 
now living at Terre Coupee Prairie, and was 
the elder brother of the late Major Ethan S. 
Reynolds of this city Young Reynolds and 
his older brother, Stuart, both but boys, de- 
cided to seek to better their fortune in some 
other section of the country, and John secured 
employment on a faim near Fort Wayne. He 
was active and industrious and when the man 
for whom he worked, obtained a contract for 
building a canal, he appointed him as foreman, 
and he turned the first shovel of dirt on the 
main feeder of the Wabash and Erie canal. In 
1833 the family moved to Rolling Prairie, La- 
porte County, and there remained. John Rey- 
nolds then went to Illinois where he took up 




HON. .JOHN HEYNOLDS. 

a land claim, and after remaining there about 
three months he sold his claim for $2,000.00 
and returned to Rolling Prairie with about 
$3,000.00 which was the financial foundation of 
his subsequent success in lite. He became in- 
terested in a contract for the construction of 
the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern rail- 
road from Toledo west to the Indiana state 
line, but his partners failing, and the company 
becoming involved, he took the portion he had 
constructed and operated it as an individual 
enterprise for three years when the company 
was able to meet its obligations and accepted 
the work. During this time he was also en- 
gaged in the mercantile business with his 
brothers George and Ethan. Later he retired 
from the mercantile business and engaged in 



banking and other financial enterprises until 
in 1860, he was accounted the wealthiest man 
in the state of Indiana. Mr. Reynolds was 
married in 1844 to Miss Clara Egbert, and five 
children were born to them, and whom he sur- 
vived. Mr. Reynolds always took a deep in- 
terest in public affairs. He was elected to the 
State Legislature in 1850-1851, and again in 
1867. In 1862 he was elected to fill the vacancy 
in the state senate caused by the resignation 
of Senator John F. Miller, and so great was 
the esteem in which he was held by both 
parties that his election was without opposi- 
tion. He was a delegate to the Baltimore con- 
vention which nominated ijincoin for the sec- 
ond term, and was named as a presidential 
elector when James G. Blaine was the candi- 
date in 1884. He was also a member of the 
Constitutional Convention and rendered most 
valuable service in that important convention. 
Although too old to enter the army, in 1861 
he sent two substitutes to the field and main- 
tained their families during their terms of ser- 
vice. He was a warm personal friend and ad- 
viser of Governor O. P. Morton, of Indiana, 
during that terrible conflict. He was essen- 
tially the architect of his own fortune, and his 
life forms a most worthy and striking example 
to the poor boys of the present day, emphasi- 
zing the fact that it is possible for a poor boy, 
with no educational advantages, to achieve 
honorable distinction as a business man and a 
statesman. His life was an epitome of gen- 
erous and noble deeds, and his memory will 
long be cherished by those who realized his 
many excellent qualities and sterling charac- 
ter. 



MAJOR ETHAN S. RFA'NOLDS. 
One of the most prominent energetic and pro- 
gressive citizens and business men of South 
Bend was Major Ethan S. Reynolds whose 
deeply lamented death occurred in this city 
on Tuesday, April 18, 1899. Mr. Reynolds was 
in every respect a typical American, and was 
endowed with every qualification that has so 
grandly developed the western section of the 
country, and advanced the material progress of 
the age. He was a native of Indiana, and was 
born near Richmond, in Wayne County, De- 
cember 12, 1820. He was of Irish descent, and 
his sturdy ancestors left the old country and 
journeyed to America at a very early date, lo- 
cating in the old Virginia colony. His pater- 
nal grandfather was a patriot in the Revolu- 
tionary war. Major Reynolds was the son of 
Joseph F. Reynolds, who was born in Virginia, 
and who was a tiller of the soil in that fruit- 
ful locality. His father moved to Ohio, when 
he was quite a young man, and afterward lo- 



92 



SOUTH BEND. 



cated in Wayne County, Indiana, where he was 
extensively engaged in farming, and where Ma- 
jor Reynolds was born. In 1833 his father, 
with a large family, left their home in Wayne 
County, traveled by ox teams and came to 
Northern Indiana. They passed through South 
Bend, then but a struggling hamlet in the 
wilderness, and journeyed to Rolling Prairie, 
in Laporte County, where he decided to settle 
and where he lived to the venerable age of 
eighty-one years. He was a pioneer in every 
sense of the term, and had experienced that 
hardy life in the states of Virginia, Ohio, Ken- 
tucky, Missouri and Indiana. Major Reynolds 
was a resident of Laporte County until 1845. 
when he came to South Bend, and with his 
two brothers, George W. Reynolds and Hon. 




still reside in the old homestead. During the 
civil war Major Reynolds was appointed Pay- 
master of the Army of the Cumberland, and 
served in that honorable and responsible posi- 
tion for three years. When the war closed the 
returned to South Bend where for a number of 
years he was actively engaged in the paper 
manufacturing business. Mr. Reynolds was al- 
ways a great reader, and frequently indulged 
in extensive travel. He kept himself fully in- 
formed in regard to current events and being 
a man of positive convictions he always 
evinced a deep interest in public affairs. His 
faith in the future growth and greatness of the 
city of South Bend was unlimited and unfail- 
ing and he lived to see the fulfillment of his 
hopes and the realization of his prophecies. 
He was one of the organizers, a stockholder 
and vice president of the First National Bank, 
and accumulated large property interests. No 
man enjoyed a wider acquaintance in South 
Bend or was more highly esteemed in the com- 
munity. He was a genial, consistent and cour- 
teous gentleman, and won the respect of all 
who knew him and who came within the circle 
of his acquaintance. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds 
had three childien, but only one .s now living. 
Captain Edward B. Reynolds, who is the vice 
president of the First National Bank. Mr. 
Reynolds' death was universally mourned and 
his remains were carried to the grave by a large 
concourse of sorrowing friends. The honorary 
pa.l bearers were: Messrs. William Miller, A. 
G. Cushing, James Oliver, J. C. Knoblock and 
C. A. Kimball, while the active bearers were: 
Elmer Crockett, A. B. France, S. T. Applegate. 
Charles Coonley and M. B. Staley. 



MAJOR ETHAN' S. REYNOLDS. 

John Reynolds, engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness on the north side of Washington street, 
between Michigan and Main streets, and where 
they engaged as clerks a number of young men 
who afterward attained prominence in this 
city. In 1849 when the California "gold fever" 
was at its height, Major Reynolds with a small 
party traveled overland to the "El Dorado" and 
after more than a year's experience, he return- 
ed home by way of the Isthmus of Panama 
and New York in 1851. In September of that 
year Major Reynolds was married to Miss Ja- 
nette B. Briggs, a daughter of Eliakim Briggs. 
a most estimable lady, who survives him, and 
they began their domestic life at the corner of 
Lafayette and Washington streets and Mrs. 
Reynolds, and her son Edward B. Reynolds, 



PETER E. STUDEBAKER. 

Mr. Peter E. Studebaker, whose deeply la- 
mented death occurred at Alma, Michigan, on 
October 9, 1897, was an honored citizen of 
South Bend, and the experienced treasurer of 
the Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing Company. 
He was born in Ashland, Ohio, April 1, 1836, 
and was a son of John Studebaker, who early 
settled near Gettysburg, Pa., the scene of one 
of the greatest battles of the civil war. His 
father journeyed from Pennsylvania, over the 
Allegheny mountains, to Ohio, in a wagon of 
his own manufacture, and Mr. Peter E. Stude- 
baker was born shortly after they arrived in 
their new home. Here he attended the public 
schools, and in 1852, when but sixteen years of 
age, he left home and came to South Bend, 
where he secured a position with Kingsley & 
Beach, the leading dry goods merchants at that 
time here, as a clerk, at the munificent salary 
of fifteen dollars a month. By the strictest 



SOUTH BEND 



93 



economy he saved $100.00 and began h ; s busi- 
ness career as an itinerant merchant. This he 
continued until 1856, when he was married to 
Miss Dora Handley, of Cincinnati. Ohio, and 
then removed to Goshen, where he formed a 
partnership with his brother-in-law, P. A. 
Welch, a well known merchant in that city. 
He remained in this business until 1860, when 
he entered into an arrangement with his broth- 
ers, Clem and J. M. Studebaker, who were 
manufacturing wagons in South Bend, to 
handle their product in Goshen. He early dis- 
played the qualities of pushing energy which 
characterized his after life and he was so 
successful in the wagon business that he was 
offered a partnership with his brothers in their 




PETER E. STIDEBAKER. 

growing business. He accepted the offer and 
in 1864 became a member of the Studebaker 
Bros. In 1865 he established a branch ware- 
house at St. Joseph, Mo., which was then quite 
an important town largely interested in fur- 
nishing outfits for the mines and other western 
enterprises. He soon built up a large trade 
and extended the business of the firm to all 
the western states and territories. In 1872 he 
relinquished the office at St. Joseph and re- 
turned to South Bend, where he at once as- 
sumed the duties of treasurer of the Studebaker 
Bros. Manufacturing Company, which position 
he most ably filled until his death. His first 
wife died in 1865. In 1872 he was married to 
Mrs. Mary L. Guthrie, a most estimable lady, 
and a daughter of Judge W. Charles Bwing, of 
Logansport, Ind., who survives him. Mr. Stu- 



debaker was always an energetic and forceful 
man of business, and a close and intelligent ob- 
server of the changing commercial and political 
conditions of his time. He was a progressive 
financier in the highest sense of the term, and 
most carefully noted the various fluctuations in 
the financial conditions both of this country 
and of Europe, and was always prepared for 
any financial stringency or commercial emer- 
gency. He also took a deep interest in public 
affairs and in national politics. He frequently 
delivered addresses on political and economic 
subjects and contributed valuable articles to 
the press on the important topics of the day. 
He was the adviser and counsellor of many 
men prominent in public affairs, and enjoyed 
the friendship and esteem of the leading men 
in all sections of the country. He was a genial 
gentleman and was always a favorite visitor at 
the clubs and social circles of South Bend and 
Chicago, where he had many admiring friends. 
Mrs. P. E. Studebaker, his widow, is a lady of 
refinement and is well known in this com- 
munity for her many acts of philanthropy and 
kindness. She is a most estimable lady and 
is warmly esteemed by all who have the honor 
of her acquaintance or have come within the 
charm of her personality. She has rebuilt and 
modernized the family homestead on West 
Washington street, and will make it a delight- 
ful home for her declining years. Mr. Stude- 
baker left three children, Mr. Wilbur F. Stude- 
baker, now of New York City; Mrs. Nelson J. 
Riley, of South Bend, and Mrs. W. R. Innes, 
of Yonkers, N. Y. In dying Mr. Studebaker 
left an enduring memory of his many admir- 
able qualities and strong business attributes, 
and the community at large were mourners at 
his bier 



FRED D. ELLSWORTH. 

Mr. Fred D. Ellsworth, whose death occurred 
in this city on April 27, 1897, was for years one 
of the leading citizens and merchants of South 
Bend, and was endeared to the community. 
He was born at Mishawaka. December 27, 1849, 
and was the son of James Ellsworth who was 
well known in that locality. Mr. Ellsworth's 
parents died when h'e was quite young. He 
received his education in the public schools 
and his first business engagement was a clerk- 
ship in the dry goods store of John Chess. He 
afterward engaged in the store of Stern Bros. 
at the corner of Michigan and Washington 
streets, and in 1875 commenced business for 
himself at No. 104 North Michigan street where 
he successfully conducted a general notion busi- 
ness. Here he remained until 1882 when he re- 
moved to 113 South Michigan street, and in 
1883 he formed a partnership with Mr. G. E. 



94 



SOUTH BEND. 



Rose, and removed to a more commodious store 
at No. Ill North Michigan street. Soon after 
he erected the handsome new store building 
at Nos. 113-115 North Michigan street where 







GEORGE W. BAKER. 

Mr. George W. Baker, who departed this life 
on Sunday, February 4, 1900, was for nearly 
a quarter of a century one of the best-known 
citizens of South Bend, and prominently iden- 
tified with one of its leading industrial enter- 
prises, known as the South Bend Chilled Plow 
Company, of which he was the secretary and 
treasurer. Mr. Baker was a native of Greene 
County, Ohio, and was born in 1832. When 
quite a boy he removed with his parents to 
Indiana and located on a farm at Sumption 
Prairie, where he attended school and received 
the education that fitted him for his useful 
and energetic after life. His first business 
venture was in 1845 when he was but thir- 
teen years of age. he, with his brother, Adam 
S. Baker, rafted a load of poplar lumber down 
the Kankakee river to Peoria, Illinois. He de- 
cided to locate in Illinois, and learned the 
trade of a carpenter at which he worked for 
several years and assisted in the construction 
of a number of buildings in this city. He was 
located in Jacksonville for some time, and then 
removed to Decatur, Illinois, where he success- 
fully engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business. In 1875, in company with several 
others, he organized the St. Joseph Reaper and 
Machine Company, and in 1876 removed to 



FHEI) r>. ELLSWORTH. 



he removed, and where he conducted the lead- 
ing dry goods business in the city when his 
death occurred. Mr. Ellsworth was married on 
November 22, 1871, to Nellie M. Chess, a daugh- 
ter of Mr. John W. Chess and his family con- 
sisted of one son, Mr. John Chess Ellsworth, 
who succeeded his father and now so success- 
fully conducts the business which he establish- 
ed. Mr. Ellsworth was a substantial business 
man of sterling character and progressive ideas, 
and his influence in the commercial community 
was most beneficial and elevating. Quiet and 
unassuming he was at the same time vigorous 
and active in any undertaking in which he was 
engaged, and compelled success by the very 
force of his own individuality. His many acts 
of unostentatious kindness are well remember- 
ed and his name is still revered by those who 
knew him in the activities of life. Though a 
public spirited man in the highest sense Mr. 
Ellsworth had no desire for ublic life, hut 
always evinced a deep interest in the substan- 
tial progress and advancement of the city. 
Mrs. Ellsworth survived her husbnd until Nov- 
ember 12. 1900, when she died after a linger- 
ing and iiainful illness mourned by all who 
knew her. 




6E0U0E W. BAKED. 



South Bend, where he resided until his death. 
The company he organized was soon after 
merged in the South Bend Chilled Plow Com- 
pany, which was extensively engaged in the 



SOUTH BEND 



05 



manufacture of plows, and built up a large and 
constantly increasing business, which extended 
over the entire country. Mr. Baker was an 
active and energetic business man, and as its 
secretary and treasurer he was an important 
factor in building up the present large busi- 
ness. He was active in all that conserved the 
best interests of this city, but declined to take 
a prominent part in political affairs. He was 
deeply interested in the welfare of the Milburn 
Memorial Chapel, of which he was a member 
and superintendent of the Sabbath School. 
His death was mourned oy a large circle of 
friends, and no man was more highly esteemed 
in the community, in March, 1850, he was 
married to Miss Katherine Dewey, of Jackson- 
ville, 111., and at his death left two children, 
Mr. A. D. Baker, who succeeded him as secre- 
tary and treasurer of the South Bend Chilled 
Plow Company, and Mrs. Oren, the wife of 
Mr. W. H. Oren, ex-treasurer of St. Joseph 
County. 



CARLTON WADHAMS. 
In the death of Mr. Carlton Wadhams, which 
occurred at the family residence on South 
Michigan street, May 4, 1891, South Bend lost 
one of its popular, public spirited and progres- 
sive citizens, and a man whose business im- 




ford, September 12, 1810. His father, David 
Wadhams, was a New England farmer, and 
his mother was Phoebe (Collins) Wadhams. 
The family aates its nistory to Colonial times, 
and the grandfather of Mr. Wadhams was a 
revolutionary patriot. (Jarlton Wadhams was 
one of a family of sixteen, and early learned 
to work on the home farm. In 1832 he made 
the journey to Chicago by. canal and wagon, 
and finding business opportunities to his liking, 
he returned east, and in 1836 removed per- 
manently to Chicago and located at Blue Island, 
where he lived for manv years. He was en- 
gaged in the cattle business, and was also the 
owner of Wadhams' Hotel for many years. 
He was an energetic and far-seeing business 
man, and in the early fifties had amassed a 
fortune. In 1857, with his wife, he started for 
the east, and through a wreck on the Lake 
Shore Railroad, was compelled to stay over 
night in South Bend, hotel accommodations 
were meager and he stopped at the American 
Hotel, located where Coonley's drug store now 
is. Upon retiring he found his bed inhabited, 
and so voracious were the bugs that sleep 
was impossible, and he arose at daylight and 
started for a walk. He wandered in the old 
Sample orchard and was so much taken with 
the beauty of the place that he returned to 
the hotel, consulted with his wife and before 
night Dought the place, and thus became a 
citizen of South Bend. Mr. Wadhams finan- 
cially assisted many enterprises in this city, 
and through his great wealth aided many men 
in their education and helped them on to suc- 
cess, tie was one of the founders of the 
great Dodge Manufacturing Company, of 
Mishawaka, and he aiso helped other enter- 
prises here to secure a footing. He was 
one of the organizers of the First National 
Bank, and was a director irom 1871 until his 
death. He was a man of the highest probity 
and nonor. He saw only the good is humanity 
and excused weakness. He was charitable and 
benevolent to a fauit, and was loved by all. 
Mr. Wadhams was married m 1838 to Miss 
Hulda M. Stedman, who d.ed April 18, 1890. 
He has two children, one, Mrs. Mary Periam, 
of Rogers Park, Chicago, now deceased, and 
Mrs. Phoebe Morgan, the wife of Mr. Henrv 
C. Morgan, of this city, who survives him. 



CARLTON WADHAMS. 

press is felt in our leading commercial circles. 
Mr. Carlton Wadhams was a native of Con- 
necticut, and came of hardy Yankee stocK. 
He was born at Goshen near the City of Hart- 



NELSON P. BOWSHER. 
The late Mr. Nelson P. Bowsher, the founde.- 
of The N. P. Bowsher Company, manufacturers 
of feed mills and machinery specialties, was an 
honored citizen of South Bend for a number 
of years, and contributed materially to the ad- 
vancement and progress of the city, both in 



SOUTH BEND 



private and public service. He was born in 
Noble County, Indiana, in 1S45. and was the 
son of Boston Bowsher and Sophia (Koonce) 
Bowsher. When he came to this city in 1871 
he was regarded as one of the best hand cabi- 
net makers in the middle west, having demon- 
strated his skill against \he leading workers in 
that branch of business. \One spring morning 
in 1871 Mr. Bowsher walked into South Bend, 
and the same energetic spirit that prompted 
him to make his way on foot, when his funds 
were exhausted, rather than resort to question- 
able methods of transportation, has character- 
ized his entire life and laid the enduring foun- 
dations of his later success. At that time he 
was of a frail build and marked by his friends 
for an early demise, but he secured employment 




P 



NELSON P. BOWSHEU. 

in the overhauling of the Keedy & Loornis 
flour mills, which was then in progress. Here 
his exceptional skill with tools, clear mechani- 
cal insight and forceful industry commanded 
recognition, and shortly afterward he entered 
the employ of Bissell & DeCamp, machinists 
and mill v, rights. He was next engaged in the 
pattern department of the Oliver Plow Works. 
Here for eight years his history was one of 
well deserved advancement at the hands of 
generous and appreciative employers who rec- 
ognized the value of his service. During these 
years Mr. Bowsher assisted in bringing out 
many of the early triumphs of this mammoth 
institution, but ill health compelled him to 
sever his connection with this establishment, 



and although he never re-entered the employ 
of the Messrs. Oliver, their friendly interest 
and the good will of other prominent manufac- 
turers contributed largely to the success of his 
own later business ventures, and as business 
frequently took him fiom home, he established 
Arm personal and business friendships with 
leading Arms in all parts of the country. Mr. 
Bowsher held but one public office. He was 
elected water works trustee in 1884 by a ma- 
jority several times greater than his own ticket, 
and served until 1887, giving himself up to 
the duties of Ihe position at the material sacri- 
fice of his own interests. During his term of 
service the city perfected its priceless system 
of artesian water supply and the fiist steam 
pumps were installed, and Mr. Bowsher and 
his co-workers enjoyed the satisfaction of see- 
ing the completion of their labors and the suc- 
cessful operation of the improvements before 
the expiration of their terms of office. Mr. 
Bowsher was at all times alive to the best in- 
terests of the city and invariably assisted in 
every enterprise that tended to promote the 
advancement of South Bend, both at home and 
abroad. His death occurred in 1898, after an 
intermittent illness of four years, during which 
time the active management of his business 
was confided to the hands of his two sons, 
D. D. Bowsher and J. C. Bowsher, but the im- 
press of his strong personality was, and is, 
still felt in every enterprise with which he was 
connected. One of his latest acts was a liberal 
gift in money to the building fund of Epworth 
Hospital. During all his res'dence in South 
Bend he was a consistent member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. 



HON. JOHN BROWNFIELD. 

No man was ever more warmly endeared to 
this community, nor occupied a higher place 
in the respect of our people than the late Hon. 
John Brownfield, whose death occurred in this 
city January 21, 1890. His many kindly acts 
are still fresh and fragrant in the memories 
of those who knew and loved him while he 
lived, and who were ever proud to be num- 
bered among his friends. Mr. Brownfield was 
a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in 
Uniontown, Payette county, in that state, De- 
cember 24, 1808. His parents were Virginians, 
who came of English descent. His father was 
of Pughstown, Frederick county, Va., on the 
mountain near the Shenandoah Valley His 
mother. Elizabeth Fisher, was a Friend (Qua- 
ker), and through existing records of mar- 
riages and births of that society her ancestry 
is accurately traced to Hanley-on-Thames and 
Barmstone, Yorkshire, 1672. Emigrated in 



SOUTH BEND 



97 



1703 to Bucks county, Pa. Further details of 
lineage are given in an "In Memoriam," ad- 
mirably written and privately circulated by- 
James Searight (a nephew of Mr. Brownfield) 
in honor of his father and mother (Mr. Brown- 
field's sister). The old house in which Mr. 
Brownfield' s mother lived on Back Creek, near 
the village of Gainsboro, about nine miles 
northwest of Winchester, Va., is still in the 
possession of some of her mother's descend- 
ants, and a photograph of it is in the pos- 
session of Mr. Biownfield's children. As a boy 
he attended school in Uniontown until he was 
fifteen years of age, when he secured employ- 
ment in a large general store kept by Isaac 
Beeson, the leading merchant of that place. 
At this occupation he worked for five years 




HON. .tOHN BROWNFIELD. 

for his "board and clothes," and at the end 
of that time received eight dollars a month 
and his board. Here he gained health and 
strength and a knowledge of business and when 
he was twenty-one he engaged in business 
with his elder brother. Col. Ewing Brownfield. 
After three years he married Miss Lydia A. 
Beeson, the daughter of his former employer, 
and shortly afterward, with his young wife, ha 
came to Niles, Mich., to visit some members 
of the Beeson family, who had located there. 
During his visit he came to South Bend, La- 
porte and several other villages in this section 
of the state, and finally decided to remove to 
this city and engage in business. In 1834 he 
returned here, and bringing with him a stock 



of goods amounting to about $3,000. He pur- 
chased a lot near Michigan and Water streets, 
and erected a large frame building, and for 
fifty-four years was one of the most success- 
ful and respected merchants in Northern In- 
diana. Afterward in 1857, an extensive brick 
store building and residence was erected here, 
and notwithstand'ng the trend of business 
southward Mr. Brownfield adhered to his first 
location and continued to transact a large busi- 
ness. Everyone within the radius of his in- 
fluence and personality knew him for an honest 
man in the highest and noblest sense of the 
term. His trade increased, his credit was un- 
impeached, and he passed successfully through 
the financial panics of 1837 and 1840, when al- 
most every other merchant in the city was com- 
pelled to suspend. When the South Bend 
branch of the State Bank of Indiana was estab- 
lished Mr. Brownfield was its first president, 
and most ably conducted its affairs during its 
entire existence. He conducted a private bank 
for some years after and finally organized the 
South Bend National Bank, remaining its 
president until he went out of business. So 
firmly established was his reputation for abil- 
ity and honesty that when the South Bend 
Iron Works was organized he was made presi- 
dent of the company, at Mr. Oliver's sugges- 
tion, and he held this important office for many 
years. During his busy, useful and eventful 
life he held many positions of honor and trust, 
and in every act exemplified the highest prin- 
ciples of honor, and a consistant and scrupu- 
lous regard for probity and rectitude. H-3 
never condescended to drive a "sharp bargain," 
and always paid what goods were worth, and 
everyone was assured of full measure and am- 
ple weight who dealt at his warehouse. Dur- 
ing the course of many years he had become 
heavily indebted, and it became necessary in 
1889 for him to settle his debts by disposing 
of all of his property. Everything he pos- 
sessed was unhesitatingly and voluntarily 
given up to satisfy the claims of creditors, and 
his chief fear and apprehension was that his 
assets would not fully meet his every liability. 
When his affairs were finally settled by Mr. 
Marvin Campbell, his son-in-law, and every 
debt was paid in full he felt a commendable 
pride in the thought that no man had been 
wronged out of a dollar. In his religious life 
he was firm, steadfast and consistent. He em- 
braced religion in 1829 and was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church until his 
death. In 1835 after coming to South Bend, 
he formed the nucleus of a Sunday school 1n 
his own home, with only six scholars In a 
little time a log house was erected at Pearl 
and Jefferson streets, and from this inception 



OS 



SOUTH BEND 



has grown the Sunday school of the First M. 
E. Church of this city. Mr. Brownfield was 
superintendent for forty-three years and the 
children and grandchildren of his first scholars 
afterward came under his kindly spiritual min- 
istrations. He conscientiously lived the lite 
he taught and was a living precept for the 
betterment and elevation of humanity. He was 
not only active in the church hut a very liberal 
contributor. He was a constant attendant at 
all services for more than half a century. 
When his place was vacant it was evidence that 
he was ill, or out of the city. He was always 
generous to the deserving and no appeal for 
aid was ever made in vain. In politics he was 
a Democrat, and was one of the first trustees 
of the village, outliving all of his associates. 
He was president of the board from 1845 to 
1848 and treasurer from 1S4S to 1859, while for 
many years he was active chief of the Fire 
Department. He was modest and retiring and 
honestly believed that no office was worth hav- 
ing except it came as an honor unsought. He 
prized far more highly the Trusteeship of As- 
bury University than any political honor that 
could have been conferred upon him, and con- 
tributed liberally to its support. During the 
rebellion he was a staunch Union man and at 
once offered his services to Governor Mortou 
in any position in which he might be useful. 
Loving, kind, charitable and noble he was a 
prince among men. and his death was a public 
bereavement. Mr. Brownfield's first wife died 
in 1S53. and in 1856 he was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Ellis ot Philadelphia, who is also 
deceased. He left two children of his first 
marriage to survive him, both of whom are 
now living. Mr. John Brownfield, Jr.. a gradu- 
ate of both Asbury and Harvard, and a widely 
known lawyer, and Mrs. Lydia Campbell, wife 
of Hon. Marvin Campbell, one of our most 
prominent citizens and business men. At his 
funeral all creeds and denominations were 
represented, Protestants and Catholics, He- 
brews and Gentiles, for he was the friend of all. 



DR. LOUIS HUMPHREYS. 

One of the most prominent physicians and 
public spirited citizens of South Bend was 
Dr. Louis Humphreys, whose deeply lamented 
death occurred in this city on May 9, 1880. 
Dr. Humphreys was identified with the pro- 
fessional and social life of this city from 1844, 
when he first came here to practice medicine, 
until his death, except during the civil war, 
wnen he was heroically engaged in the service 
of his country. He was a native of Ohio, and 
was born in Springfield. :n that state, Septem- 
ber 21, 1816. His father, John Humphreys, was 



a native of Ireland, who came to America 
when he was twenty-one years of age and lo- 
cated in Ohio, and his mother was a most es- 
timable Virginia lady. Dr. Humphreys was 
educated at Franklin Academy, in Kentucky, 
and the high school at Springfield. He came 
to South Bend first in 1838, and commenced 
the study of medicine with his brother. Dr. 
Harvey Humphreys, who was established in 
practice here. He then went to Laporte, Ind„ 
where he commenced his studies at the Indi- 
ana State University, but on the discontinu- 
ance of the medical department of that insti- 
tution he attended college at Keokuk, Iowa, 
and graduated in 1S44. He then returned to 
South Bend and practiced with his brother 
for several years, when he established himselt 




DR. LOUIS HUMPHREYS. 

in his profession on his own account. Dr. 
Humphreys was always a man of liberal and 
progressive ideas, and in 1855 he was instru- 
mental in the organization of the St. Joseph 
County Medical Society, and was its presi- 
dent during 1855, 1856 and 1857. He was also 
one of the founders of the St. Joseph Valley 
Medical Association, and served as its presi- 
dent in 1874 and 1875. In July, 1861, he en- 
tered the army and was appointed surgeon of 
the Twenty-ninth Indiana Volunteers. He also 
served as brigade surgeon from March until 
June, 1S62, when he was appointed by Presi- 
dent Lincoln as one of eight medical inspectors 
of the United States Army, w r itn the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel, and with headquarters ai 



SOUTH BEND 



99 



Washington. He was with the Armies of the 
Potomac and the Southwest, and rendered 
valuable service to his country, both in the 
field and the executive management of the 
medical department, bringing order out of 
chaos and perfectly systematizing the medical 
operations of the army. He remained in this 
honorable and responsible position until June 
1, 1866, when he returned home and again re- 
sumed his private practice. For four years 
he was Commissioner of the Indiana Hospital 
for the Insane, and in 1868 he was elected 
Mayor of South Bend. So ably did he fulfil; 
the duties of this position that in 1S70 he 
was reelected and served the second term, 
an honor rarely accorded a city official. He 
was one of the originators of the St. Joseph 
County Savings Bank, and was the president 
of that institution from its inception until 
his death. Dr. Humphreys was a deep lover 
of music and a student of higher literature, 
an able writer and a most charming and in- 
structive conversationalist. He organized the 
Philharmonic Society in this city, and was 
one of the originators of the Public Library, 
which was started long before the present 
law was adopted, and which was sustained 
in modest quarters in a store on Michigan 
street by the private contributions of our 
citizens, chief among whom was Dr. Hum- 
phreys. He was a charter member of the local 
lodges of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias, 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
and held honorable official positions in all. 
In religious affiliations he was a Presbyterian, 
and for years was an elder and trustee of the 
First Cnurch of this city. Professionally he 
was a member of the Indiana State Medical 
Society, and of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, and contributed numerous important 
papers to the medical journals of the day. 
Dr. Humphreys was of commanding and im- 
posing stature, courteous and dignified, and 
one of the most genial and generous of men. 
No appeal was ever made to him in vain, and 
many of the poor and deserving people of this 
city received not only his professional minis- 
trations without fee, but were substantially 
helped by his kindly provisions for their phy- 
sical needs. During his long career in this 
city no one more fully enjoyed the esteem of 
his friends and the entire community, and his 
death was mourned by all. Dr. Humphreys 
was married in April, 1844, to Miss Margaret 
Pierson, a resident of Cooperstown, New York, 
and this most estimable laay was his compan- 
ion and assistant during his busy and useful 
life, and still survives him. Dr. Humphreys 
also left two daughters, Mary and Evelyn 
Humphreys, and the latter most ably fills the 



responsible position of librarian at the Public 
Library- Mrs. Humphreys and her two daugh- 
ters reside in the old homestead, at No. 502 
West Wasnington street, and are endeared 
to hosts of friends. 



JAMES OLIVER. 



The wonderful progress and miterial ad- 
vancement of the city of South Bend is in- 
seperably linked with the name of Mr. James 
Oliver, who for a half century has been one of 
the most important factors in its substantial 
growth and development. From its earliest 
efforts to found a great and thriving manufac- 
turing city, Mr. Oliver has been prominently 
identified with every movement that tended to 
legitimately promote its interests, and to his 
unfailing public spirit and his progressive ideas 
the city is indebted for one of its largest manu- 
factories, the most handsome and completely 
equipped hotel, a beautiful temple of the 
drama, and some of the most impos'ng struc- 
tures that now adorn our streets. The growth 
of Mr. James Oliver has marked the substan- 
tial growth of this city, and as South Bend has 
expanded from the primitive village of fifty 
years ago to the present proud position it now 
holds among the cities of the west, so Mr. Oli- 
ver has developed from the energetic and hon- 
est workingman to the honored proprietor and 
manager of one of the greatest industries in the 
country, and the most philanthropic of citi- 
zens. Mr. Oliver comes of sturdy Scotch an- 
cestry and early learned the true worth of 
honest and unremitting labor, and success has 
never weakened his warm regard and respect 
for the conscientious workman and the honest 
artisan. Mr. Oliver was Porn in Liddisdale 
parish, Rocksburyshire, Scotland on August 2S 
1823, and his parents were in humble circum- 
stances. When lie was twelve years of age 
they came to America and for one year they 
located in Seneca County, N. Y., and finally per- 
manently settled in Mishawaka. When but 
thirteen years old he contributed to the mainte- 
nance of the family, and at seventeen he com- 
menced what may be justly termed an active 
business career. In the summer of 1840 he 
undertook a contract for the Lee Company, of 
Mishawaka, to dig a trench for laying pump 
logs to carry water from a brook through Vis- 
tula street to the race and still house, wmch 
was built in tnat year His first venture was 
successful, but not very remunerative, and he 
continued in the employ of the Lee Company 
in various capacities, during which time, with 
but little capital and large credit. Le purchased 
a building and lot across the river from the 
Lee establishment. The property was destroy- 



835101 



ioo 



SOUTH BEND. 



ed by fire and Mr. Oliver, who was sleeping in 
the building, had a narrow escape from being 
burned to death. He then wonted in the coop- 
er shop of the factory and in a short time had 
mastered the rudiments of coopering and could 
turn out eleven batrels a day, getting out his 
own timber and shaving his own staves. From 
1845 to 1S55 he was in the employ of the St. 
Joseph Iron Works where he acquired a 
thorough and practical knowledge of the 
foundry business. Prior to this time, however, 
he was married to Miss Susan Doty, a most 
estimable young lady of Mishawaka, and they 
eommenced housekeeping in a modest cottage 
which he had purchased, and later he removed 




JAMES OLIVER. 

to a more commodious home on the north side 
of the city of Mishawaka. In 1855 the foundry 
changed ownership and Mr. Oliver left its em- 
ploy. He came to South Bend in order to take 
a train for Goshen, where he thought of loca- 
ting, and wnile waiting for the train he met 
with a Mr. Lamb who was associated with Mr. 
Ira Fox in a small iron foundry, and after due 
consideration he decided to purchase an interest 
in the business. This was Mr. Oliver's tirst 
business venture in South Bend, and from that 
humble beginning has grown the mammoth 
manufacturing establishment of the present 
day. This foundry was known as the Soutli 
Bend Iron Works, and was located on Mill 
street, near Washington street, on the we.--t 



race, and the site is now occupied by the Co- 
quillard Wagon Works. In a few years Mr. 
Oliver bought out the interests of his partners 
and assumed full control of the business. His 
first contract was for supplying the iron col- 
umns for the new St. Joseph Hotel which was 
being erected on the corner of Washington and 
Main streets, where the stately "Oliver" now 
stands. While engaged in this work there was 
a freshet in the river which washed away his 
water power and flooded his foundry. Undis- 
mayed, however, Mr. Oliver at once put in 
horse power and succeeded in delivering the 
columns to the builders at the specified time. 
On Christmas eve, 1859, the foundry was burned 
to the ground, but was rebuilt and the business 
was renewed on a more extensive scale. Mr. 
Oliver was afterward associated with Mr. T. M. 
Bissell, and Mr. George Milburn, of Mishawaka, 
also became interested in the growing enter- 
p:ise. In 1864 another fire occurred, and this 
although equally disastrous, was more speedily 
overcome and rebuilt, with increased facilities. 
At this time Mr. Oliver began his experiments 
in the manufacture of the chilled plow which 
has since made his name famous wherever 
progressive agriculture is known throughout 
the world. Thoroughly convinced of the utility 
of his invention, and feeling assured of its ulti- 
mate success, he labored incessantly night and 
day to perfect his great invention. In spite of 
ignorance and opposition, the ridicule of 
friends and the attacks of critics he persevered, 
surmounting all difficulties, always confident 
and determined to achieve success, he labored 
on and at last came the fulfillment of his 
dreams, the realization of his hopes, and the 
substantial and permanent reward for his un- 
failing courage and um emitting labor. At the 
Centennial Exposition in Philadeplhia in 1870, 
the Oliver Chilled Plow was triumphantly ex- 
hibited and gained the favorable verdict of the 
agriculturists of the world. Its success was 
assured, and the limited facilities of the work; 
soon proved too inadequate to supply the great 
and increasing demand for these modern im- 
plements. Enlarged works were now a necces- 
sity, and Mr. Oliver, with that forethought 
which has ever characterized his business man- 
agement, purchased the Perkins farm of thirty 
two acres in the southwestern part of the city 
where the great Oliver Chilled Plow Works are 
now located. Here a thousand skilled work- 
men are employed, in the various mammoth 
departments and the products of these works 
find a market in every section of the civilized 
world. The Oliver Plow Works has becom:- 
one of the greatest manufacturing industries 
of the country, and .Mr. James Oliver is one of 
the most successful and prominent men of the 



SOUTH BEND. 



101 



age. Through all his varied experiences Mr. 
Oliver has always taken a deep interest in the 
prosperity and higher advancement of the City 
of South Bend to which he is endeared by every 
tie that can bind a man to material things, and 
he has always been foremost in advancing its 
legitimate growth and its institutions. In 1885, 
in connection with his son, Joseph D. Oliver, 
he erected the handsome and luxuriously ap- 
pointed Oliver Opera House, which is acknow- 
ledged by all theatrical managers, and the 
public, "as an example of architectural and dec- 
orative beauty unsurpassed by any structure of 
its kind in the country." The dedication of the 
Opera House, which occurred on October 2t\ 
1885, was an important public event, and the 
opening drama was Louis XI. performed by 
that sterling actor, Mr. W. H. Sheridan. In De- 
cember, 1899, Mr. Oliver threw open the doors 
of the magnificent "Oliver" Hotel, which for 
years had occupied the mind of its oiiginator 
and owner. He desired to do something for 
the city which he loved so well, and after ma- 
ture consideration the beautiful structure be- 
came a reality, and the Oliver Hotel is one 
of the most beautiful and handsomely appoint- 
ed in the country, and is absolutely fire proof 
from basement to the roof. Mr. Oliver is also 
about to again demonstrate nis great public 
spirit by erecting, from his own means, a new 
and imposing City Hall, and to await the re- 
payment of this laudable investment by the 
appreciative tax payers of South Bend. Mr. 
Oliver's home on West Washington street is an 
ideal residence and a fitting abode for himself 
and his estimable wife, who is still living to 
enjoy the fruits of her husband's industry and 
genius, and to dispense numberless acts of 
charity and womanly benevolence to those up- 
on whom fortune has failed to smile and who 
are in need of her kindly words and the help- 
ing hand of this venerable and gracious lady. 
Mr. Oliver is also the owner of an extensive 
farm of 425 acres located in the southwestern 
part of the city, which is a favorite resort of 
his, and where he spends many restful hours 
amid the growing crops and all the inspiring 
scenes of agricultuial life. His family consists 
of a son, Mr. Joseph D. Oliver, who is associat- 
ed with him in business, and whose palatial 
home and extensive grounds are the nride of 
the people of South Bend, and a daughter, Jose- 
phine, who is the estimable wife of Hon. George 
Ford, a prominent attorney of this city. Mr. 
Oliver's career has been one of honor and the 
successful crownins of honest and persistent 
labor, and his declining years are mellowed and 
cheered by the sweet repose of a life well spent 
and in the profound and grateful esteem of an 
entire community 



HON. CLEM STUDEBAKER. 

Hon. Clem Studebaker, one of the founders 
of the present gigantic wagon and vehicle 
establishment in this city, known as the Stude- 
baker Bros. Manufacturing Company, and its 
president, is a native of Pennsylvania, and 
comes of that sturay stock which has con- 
tributed so much to the material wealth of 
the Keystone State. He was born near Get- 
tysburg, in Adams County, Pennsylvania, 
March 12, 1831, and his father, John Stude- 
baker, was a successful blacksmith and wagon 
maker in that locality. When he was but four 
years of age his father decided to come west, 
and with his family, his household goods and 
his implements of trade, journeyed over the 
mountains in a wagon of his own construction 




HON. CLEM STUDEBAKER. 

and located in Ashland County, Ohio. Here 
the early youth of Mr. Studebaker was passed. 
In this locality he received his early schooling, 
and when quire a boy, with his brothers, as- 
sisted his father at the forge and in the 
workshop, thus acquiring that thorough knowl- 
edge of the business which so eminently 
equipped him for his present success. In 1850 
he determined to seek his own fortune, and 
came to South Bend, and during two terms 
he taught school in this vicinity. He then 
engaged in the blacksmith shop of a threshing 
machine company, and after one year of labor 
and economy he resolved to start in business 
for himself. In partnership with Henry Stude- 
baker, his elder brother, they opened a primi- 



Ib2 



SOUTH BEND. 



tive blacksmith shop on Michigan street, near 
Jefferson street, where they shod horses and 
did a general repair business, and succeeded 
during the first year in building two wagons. 
This was the foundation of the present great 
plant, acknowledged to be the largest in the 
world. To-day in the office of the great works 
of the Studebaker Bros, may be seen an oil 
painting of the little log blacKsmith shop bear- 
ing upon a broad sign-board the name of "John 
Studebaker. Blacksmith." from which this giant 
enterprise has sprung. From a scanty set of 
tools and a capital which amounted to $68.00, 
this firm has grown to the possession of mil- 
lions of dollars, a manufacturing capacity of 
hundreds of thousands of vehicles and a name 
and reputation which extends wherever civili- 
zation has marched with the onward step of 
progress and development. From two wagons 
a year to the present almost unlimited capa- 
city; from a log shop of meager proportions 
to a mighty coiporation whose mammoth build- 
ings cover nearly one hundred acres of ground, 
and from a scanty capital of less than one 
hundred dollars to millions well invested, un- 
limited creait and reputation, and a name 
honored in all lands, this great institution has 
grown and flourished under the guidance and 
management of its original toimder. A man 
of rare ability, ambitious, liberal, energetic 
and determined. Mr. Studebaker has justly 
earned every degree of the great success he 
has achieved. Mr. Studebaker has ever been 
a man among men, and aside from his business 
prominence, he has been active in many other 
positions in life. He is interested in the 
Methodist Church, and for years was connected 
with the extensive book concern of that de- 
nomination, and was a delegate to its geneia 
conferences. Twice he has represented the 
State of Indiana in ihe Republican National 
Conventions, and was United States Commis- 
sioner to the Paris Exposition, and that at 
New Orleans, and at the World's Columbian 
Exposition in Chicago he was president of the 
Indiana Board of Managers. He has also been 
identified with educational institutions; Is a 
member of tne trustees of Du Pauw Univer- 
sity, and is president of the Board of Trustees 
of the Chautauqua Assembly. During 1889- 
1890 Mr. Studebaker was selected by President 
Harrison to represent the United States at 
the Pan-American Congress at Washington, 
wheie his influence was largely felt. In every 
walk of life his influence is manifested, and he 
is a representative American. Broad and liberal 
in all his views, with a heart perfectly attuned 
to the cause of charity, and with a public 
spirit that manifests itself in material works 



and enduring improvements, Mr. Studebaker 
is an ideal business man, citizen, friend and 
philanthropist, and enjoys the esteem of the 
entire community of Soutn Bend. Mr. Stude- 
baker was married to Mrs. Anna Milburn 
Harper, whose father was Mr. George Milburn, 
a prominent wagon manufacturer of Misha- 
waka, and who afterward removed to Toledo, 
Ohio. Mrs. Studebaker is a most estimable 
lady and is warmly interested in church and 
charitable work. The Studebaker home is 
one of the handsomest and most charming 
residences in South Benn, and bears the his- 
toric name of "Tippecanoe," in memory of the 
famous Indian treaty which history records 
as having taken place on the grounds now oc- 
cupied Dy the stateiy mansion of the family. 



.1. M. STUDEBAKER. 
Mr. J. M. Studebaker, the vice president and 
treasurer of the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Com- 
pany, of South Bend, Indiana, was born near 
Gettysburg, in Adams County, in the state of 
Pennsylvania. October 10, 1833. His father, 
John Studebaker, conducted a blacksmith shop 
in that locality, but emigrated with his family 





.1. M. STUDEBAKER. 

to Ashland County, Ohio, when the subject of 
this sketch was two years of age. The edu- 
cational facilities of that early day were not 
extensive, and the Studebaker children, while 
living in Ashland County had to walk two 
miles in o:der to reach the country school. 
Young J. M., ended his school days at the age 



SOUTH BEND 



103 



of fifteen, when he found employment on, the 
farm of his brother-in-law at three dollars per 
month, the money going to his father to assist 
in the support of the family. In 1851 John 
Studebaker, the father, again removed with his 
family and possessions, traveling overland in 
a wagon, built by his own hands, to South 
Bend, Ind. Here he located four miles south of 
the present city, he and his family finding 
their first home in a log house during the win- 
ter of 1851 The immediate support of ths 
family during that winter was derived from 
ti attic in wood with South Bend as the market. 
Young J. M. made a record of cutting two 
cords per day which his father hauled as cut 
and sold for two dollars per cord. In t!ie 
spring of 1852 J. M. entered the employ of John 
Cotton, a wagon maker of South Bend, and in 
the winter of 1852 he made the wood work of a 
wagon and his brothers, Henry and Clem, iron- 
ed it. This was one of the first wagons ever 
made by the brothers afterwards renowned as 
the Studebaker Bros. Mlg. Co. In the spring of 
1853 a company was formed in South Bend to 
go overland to California, and for the privilege 
of joining this band with board furnished, 
young J. M. contracted to give his wagon and 
his services en route. A trip across the plains 
in those days was an undertaking involving 
both hardship and peril. This party in partic- 
ular had its full allotment of trials to make 
sure that the event in the future should not 
be forgotten. There were wearisome marches 
to be made, at times hunger and thirst to be 
endured, swelling floods to be crossed, moun- 
tains to be scaled and the pursuit of murderous 
savages to be baffled. The leader and manager 
of the party was bitten by a scorpion, and was 
buried in the Carson Valley near the Carson 
river. The pilgrimage came to an end near 
Hangtown, California, where the party dis- 
banded August 31, 1853, after a journey whicj 
had lasted just five months. At this juncture 
Mr. Studebaker's reserve iund amounted exact- 
ly to fifty cents Fortunately he secured em- 
ployment at once with a Hangtown blacksmith, 
the late H. L. Hines, who was in after years 
for a time a stockholder in the Studebaker 
Bros. Mfg. Co., and the superintendent of the 
factories. Mr. Studebaker received the con- 
tract to make twenty-five wheelbarrows at fif- 
teen dollars each and the completion of this 
work in a satisfactory manner established his 
reputation with his employer, and he became a 
partner in the business. With a determina- 
tion to make a start in the world he practiced 
rigid economy, even to doing his own washing, 
and when, at the expiration of five years he 
sold his interest and returned to South Bend 
he was able, from his savings, to pay four 



tnousand dollars in gold coin, buying out tne 
half interest in the business of Studebaker 
Bros.. Henry retiring from the business to en- 
gage in tanning. The firm name was at this 
time changed to C. & J. M. Studebaker. Clem 
Studebaker, the president of the corporation 
to-day, did the blacksmith work and J. M. was 
the wood worker. The combination was a 
strong one. Both young men were skilled me- 
chanics, active and aggress. ve in their business. 
Their affairs prospered apace, and not loug 
aLter this the firm was enlarged by taking in 
the brother next younger than J. M., Peter E. 
Studebaker and finally the youngest brother, 
Jacob F. Studebaker. This stalwart quartette, 
bringing to bear upon the business their united 
energies, skill and judgment, built up the larg- 
est vehicle works 'n the world. Mr. J. M. Stu- 
debaker is now sixty-seven years of age, but is 
still hale, vigorous and hearty and active in the 
management of his vast business interests. 
Mr. J. M. Studebaker has one son, J. M. Jr., 
and two sons-in-law, F. S. Fish and H. D. John- 
son, who are all actively engaged in the busi- 
ness. These, together with the young men of 
the different branches of the family, are fill- 
ing responsible positions with the company, 
displaying in their labors such business abiliiy 
and harmony of management as gives promise 
of the future development and continued suc- 
cess of this great industiy which has been 
built up and will one day be lett to them by the 
Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co. Mr. Studebaker has 
little patience with those who claim that the 
changed conditions in the industrial world no 
longer admit of the chances of success which 
were formerly presented to the young man 
starting in life. He maintains that the same 
qualities that insured reward fifty years ago 
are potent to-day If capital is lacking, there 
is simply the greater need for rigid saving, in- 
dustry and enterprise. Mr. Studebaker's beau- 
tiful home and extensive grounds are known as 
"Sunnyside," located in the eastern suburbs of 
the city. Whatever relates to the welfare or 
advancement of South Bend has ever been a 
matter of interest to Mr Studebaker, and how- 
ever busy he may be with his private affaiis, 
he is always ready to render the service which 
a progressive community may rightfully expect 
from its public spirited citizens 



WILLIAM L. K1ZER. 
The material development and geographical 
growth and advancement of a progressive 
American city is largely due to the business 
energy of the dealer in real property, and those 
who enable others to improve property already 
acquired. This is particularly true of South 



104 



SOUTH BEND. 



Bend and the men engaged in real estate trans- 
actions have been important factors in its sub- 
stantial growth and advancement. In this re- 
gard Mr. William L. Kizer, of the film of Kizer 
& Wool vei ton, whose offices are in the Oliver 
Opera House block, takes a high place. Mr. 
Kizer is a native of Ohio, and was born at 
Millersburg, Febiuary 15, 1S44. His father, E. 
F. Kizer, was a retired farmer, and the young 
man received a liberal college education, both 
in science and the classics. In 1S65 he came 
to South Bend and a year later was appointed 
Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue for the 
Fifth Division of the Ninth Revenue District 
of Indiana. He was then transferred to the 
general office of the Ninth District, under Col. 
Norman Eddy, and served in this important 



al.y Company, of New York. Mr. Kizer is one 
of the most entei prising business men in the 
city, and his judgment and advice in real estate 
matters is implicitly relied upon by a large 
clientage of the leading citizens. His business 
methods are prompt, conservative and 
thorough and his standing in the community 
is of the highest. In addition to his extensive 
real estate, loan and insurance business Mr. 
Kizer is inteiested in a number of business 
enterpiises, ail of which have added to tn.; 
growth and prosperity of the city. He is the 
president of the Indiana Anchor Fence Com- 
pany; treasurer of the Dr. Whitehall Megri- 
mine Company; secretary of the Malleable Steel 
rtange Manufacturing Company, and is a direc- 
tor in the St. Joseph Loan and Trust Company. 
Mr. Kizer was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Brick, and with his family resides in a hand- 
some home at No. 803 West Washington street. 




position until the spring of 186S, when he was 
appointed as Traveling Special Agent for the 
Aetna Insurance Company of Hartford, Ct. Ha 
remained in this business for about one year, 
when he returned to South Bend and engaged 
in the real estate and insurance business in 
the office of Hon. Andrew Anderson. In Juny 
1869, he formed a partnership with Jacob Wool- 
veiton, under the Arm name of Kizer & Wool- 
verton. which has been in active business in 
this city since that time. The firm conduct:; 
an extensive business in real estate, loans and 
insurance and makes investments in Illinois, 
Indiana and Michigan. They also act as agents 
for a number of leading fire insurance com- 
panies of the country, for the New York Life 
Insurance Company and the Fidelity and Casu- 



ALMOND BUGBEE. 

Mr. Almond Bugbee, one of the oldest and 
most honored citizens ot South Bend, has been 
laentuiea with me niSLOiy ot mis city lor more 
than sixty-three yeais. Mr. Bugbee comes of 
revolutionary ancestry. His grandfather, Abiel 
misuee, tought at the battle of Bunker Hill, 
under General Putnam, to whom his family 
were remoteiy relateu, and nis ia,n. j r, La, v. a 
Bugbee, was a captain ot miiitia in the second 
war ot independence, lsiz-lSlo. Almond Bug- 
bee was born at Hyde Park, Vermont, January 
6, 1815, a ptiiocl oi momentous anu stirring 
events in national nisiory, anu tue year wtucn 
maiked the beginning ot the decadence of the 
colonial idea and the inspiration of nationalism 
which Americans nave since maintained. Mr. 
Bugbee has lived through the greater part of 
the nineteentn century, and has witnessed its 
marvelous growtn, progress and inventive ad- 
vancement, and has seen South Bend, his 
adopted home, increase trom a frontier village 
of whites and Indians to one of the foiemost 
cities of Indiana. Mr. Bugbee was left an 
orphan at an early age, his mother, Fanny 
( Sessions) Bugbee, died when he was three 
years old and his father when he was but 
ten, and he was left to the care ot a widowed 
step-mother. His early education was acquired 
in the district schools, and at the age of six- 
teen he was apprenticed to Edwarn Morris, of 
Strafford. Vermont, to learn the tanner, currier 
and shoemaker trade, and although but a boy. 
he acted as assistant postmaster. He remained 
in Vermont for five years, and then staited 
west to seek his fortune. His point of desti- 
nation was Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but reach- 



SOUTH BEND. 



105 



ing Niles, Michigan, on his way, he heard so 
much of South Bend that he resolved to visit 
the p. ace and investigate its possibilities. The 
feeling was very bitter at that time, and Mr. 
Bugbee expeiienced great difficulty in securing 
a conveyance to this city. He finally reached 
South Bend March 9, 1837, where he met a 
kind reception, was pleased with the people 
and the village, and decided to remain. He at 
once commenced business, and has resided 
here ever since. He worked for a Quaker 
shoemaker named William S. Vail for a few 
months, and then, in December, 1837, he es- 
tablished a shoe store of his own, employing 
three or four men. In 1842 he purchased the 
tannery of George D. Edge, which he enlarged 
and supplied with water power, and conducted 




ALMOND BUGBEE. 

it in connection with his boot and shoe busi- 
ness, employing at one time more men than 
any other employer in the place. He was the 
first in the village to place his stock on the 
shelves ready made, as prior to that time boots 
and shoes were always made to measure and 
to order. In spite of adverse criticism, this 
new departure proved a substantial success. 
In company with the late Alexis Poote and 
others, Mr. Bugbee organized the first incor- 
porated business company in South Bend. It 
was called "The Cordwainers' Union," for the 
manufacture of boots and shoes. According 
to state official records this was the first 
co-operative union incorporated in Indiana. Mr. 
Bugbee was the president, and the other mem- 



bers were Jesse L. Waterhouse, Eliphalet Fer- 
guson, David Jodon, Mr. La Pierre and John 
G. Beitner, all o£ whom were prominent citi- 
zens. He always took a deep and kindly inter- 
est in the wenare of his employes, many of 
whom, in later years, engaged in business and 
became prospeious, respected and honored cit- 
izens. He made a contract for the erection 
of the dwelling in which he resides in 1840, 
on the day when the treaty was concluded 
with the Indians for their removal to reserva- 
tions in the then "far west.' Mr. Bugbee's 
hrst tannery was located on the west race, 
near the loot oi Colfax avenue, wheie he 
conducted me business ior nine years, when 
the factory was burned down with little insur- 
ance. He rebuilt and continued the business 
until the flood ot lSao swept away the dam 
across the river and nearly destroyed the west 
race. He next erected a furniture factoiy on 
the site and leased it, but shortly after it was 
destroyed by fire. Again he rebuilt it and 
leased it to a firm from Massachusetts, who, 
during the war of the reoellion, manufactured 
gun stocks from black walnut timDer, as well 
was the foundiy and machine shops of Mr. 
Bugbee conducted it successfully for several 
years. The factory was afterward leased to 
Judson, Montgomery & Co., to the Studebaker 
Bros., and to Alexis Coquillard, to whom he 
sold the property later. Adjoining nis factory 
was the ioundry and machine shops of Mr. 
James Oliver, in which he began his successful 
career, and between Mr. Bugbee and Mr. Oliver 
a warm friendship grew up, which has lasted 
through life. Mr. Bugbee recalls vividly the 
early pioneer days when steamboats and 
barges plied the river, when little money except 
"wild cat" was in circulation, and when busi- 
ness was conducted principally by trade, barter, 
exchange and on orders, and he was a visitor 
in Chicago when the first railroad entered that 
city. At the close of the rebellion he retired 
from business. He was at one time a director 
of the state Bank of Indiana, and his first act 
in the bank was a suggestion, adopted by the 
directors, and which saved the bank $30,000.00. 
He assisted in the organization of the St. Jo- 
seph County Savings Bank, was its first treas- 
urer, and is now a trustee of that institution, 
being one of the two of the incorporators now 
living. Mr. Bugbee through life has invariably 
acted through firm principle rather than from 
policy, and without regard to the consequences, 
and this led him in an early day to strongly 
oppose the institution of negro slavery. He 
was consistently antagonistic to a system which 
robbed the laborer of his wages and his free- 
dom, and unjustly condemned him to hopeless 
toil, and while yet an apprentice he became a 



100 



SOUTH BEND, 



warm anti-slavery advocate, and was active in 
t.iie cause until slavery was abolished, it re- 
quired moral courage 01 a hign degree to avow 
such convictions, and no nine sacrifice, and 
aitnough entirely innocent, ivir. miguee was 
maue to suffer unjustly in the united States 
i^ouit, and ine biai.e i>aniv oi i.uuana was in- 
volved in the proceeuings. mis tame courage 
01 nis convictions red him, at. an eany day, lo 
Become a stiong advocate ot tempeiance ana 
temperance measuies, and to tnese principles 
fie lias remained faithiul during his long and 
honorable lite. He was first married to Miss 
Adeiia A. Crocker, on April 28, 1844. Miss 
Crocker was tlie lady principal ot the first 
acaaerny or high school 01 the early village ot 
South Bend, and some ot the older citizens 
now living were her pupils. She died January 
28, 1861. Of this marriage one son was born, 
Mr. Willis A. Bugbee, engaged in the title 
abstract business. His second marriage \. 
with Miss Mary P. Moody, of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, on January 13, 1883. Mr. Bug- 
bee is of a kindly, genial disposition, and one 
of the rare old style of New England men, who 
are now fast disappearing. He has been identi- 
fied with all of tne public measures which best 
conserve the interests and welfare of South 
Bend since 1837, and his unpretentious career 
has been part of its history. 



EDSON FOSTER. 
Mr. Edson Foster, who has been an honored 
resident of South Bend for more than a quar- 
ter of a century, is a gentleman who is well 
known in the community and enjoys the es- 
teem of all. Mr. Foster was born at Turnbridge, 
Vermont, August 29, 1821 and is the son of 
William E. Foster and Lucinda (Walker) 
Foster. His grandfather, Hezekiah Foster, 
was a native of New Hampshire and was a pa- 
triot of the American Revolution. Mr. Foster 
was reared upon the farm and attended the 
district schools in the vicinity of his home. 
When he was fifteen years of age his parents 
came to Indiana, making the journey by teams 
and lake vessels, and located near Middlebury 
in Elkhart County, and here his father died in 
1837. Mr. Foster was engaged in teaching 
school for more than ten years in Elkhart 
County, and acquired a high reputation as an 
educator of the young. He then secured a 
clerkship and continued in this occupation for 
four years, when he engaged in the mercantile 
business. He was connected with his brother- 
in-law, and the firm was known as Foster & 
White, and their business was quite extensive. 
From 1S51 to 1S92 Mr. Foster was connected 
with this business but since 1875 it was prac- 



tically managed by Mr. White, who died during 
the latter year and the business was closed up. 
Mr. Foster made frequent additions to his 
landed interests and is the owner of several 
hundred acres of valuable farming land in Elk- 
hart County, which he rents to prosperous hus- 
bandmen. Mr. Foster came to South Bend m 
June 1875 and since that time has resided in 
this city He is the owner of valuable real 
estate in this city, and is one of the substan- 
tial citizens of this section of the state. Dur- 
ing an active life of over a half a century Mr 
Foster has ever been broad minded and public 
spirited in every sense of the term, and al- 
though of quiet taste and unostentatious man- 
ner is widely known. Mr. Foster was married 
in 1845 to Miss May H. White, a daughter of 
James J. White and his family consists of a 




EDSON POSTER. 

daughter, Mrs. Mary J. Hickox, the widow of 
Albert J. Hickox, who lived in San Francisco, 
Cal., and who with D. 0. Mills was one of the 
founders of the Petroleum and Mining Ex- 
change in New York City. Mr. Hickox died in 
July, 1883, and since that time Mrs. Hickox 
has resided with her father in South Bend. Mr. 
Foster is still in possession of vigorous health, 
and attends to his business interests with the 
same zest and promptness that characterized 
his earlier years. His comfortable home is lo- 
cated at No. 741 West Washington street, and 
here, in the enjoyment of the affections of his 
family and the esteem of the community, he is 
reaping the reward of a life of endeavor and 
usefulness. 



SOUTH BEND. 



107 



HON. A. L. BRICK. 
Splendidly equipped by nature and education, 
the Hon. Abraham Lincoln Brick has attained 
an honorable place both at the bar of St. Jo- 
seph County and in the esteem of the communi- 
ty in this section of the state of Indiana. Mr. 
Brick is an able attorney, a citizen of the high- 
est type and an American in every elevated 
sense of the term. He is a native of Indiana, 
and was born on his father's farm in Warren 
Township, St. Joseph County, May 27, 1860. His 
father came of English-Scotch ancestory and 
possessed all the strong characteristics of that 
sturdy and progressive race Mr. Brick, the 
elder, came to Indiana from New Jersey, when 
the Hoosier state was practically a wilderness 
and the home of i.ne aborigines, and here he 




HON. A. I,. BRICK. 

married Elizabeth Calvert who also came with 
her parents from the East and located in that 
vicinity. The son was educated in the district 
schools and afterward attended the grammar 
and high school of South ±>end. After that he 
took a year's course at Cornell and Yale Uni- 
versities, and then, on account of impaired 
health, he spent a year on a ranch in Kansas. 
Returning in vigorous health, he was sent to 
the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and 
graduated from that institution, with high 
honors, in 1883, and at once commenced the 
practice of law in South Bend where he has 
achieved a remarkable success and won deserved 
distinction. He has been connected with a large 
number of the most important cases which have 
occupied the attention of the courts in this dis- 



trict for years, and his abilities are recognized 
by the bench and bar and uy the entire com- 
munity. Without apparent ambition to hold 
pubi.c office, he was early regarded by his con 
stituents as the ideal official, and in 1886, when 
but twenty-six years of age, he was nominated 
as Prosecuting Attorney for the district which 
then was composed of Laporte and St. Joseph 
Counties. Although the two counties were 
largely democratic, Mr. Brick was elected by a 
majority of six votes, and his conduct of the 
office fully justified the anticipations of his po- 
litical friends. In 1892 he was selected as a 
member of the State Central Committee, and 
his advice and active services were of great 
value to his party. In 1896 he was selected as 
a Delegate to the National Convention at St. 
Louis and was a prominent figure in that his- 
toric assembly. Although reluctant to accept 
higher honors of a political nature Mr. Brick 
was prevailed upon ro accept the nomination as 
Representative to Congress from the 13th Dis- 
trict of Indiana, and in the election that follow- 
ed he defeated his opponent by 2,500 majority. 
As a representative he has been wise, consei- 
vative and always mindful of the best Interests 
of his district and the counti y at large, and has 
won the respect and regard of his fellow mem- 
beis of that legislative body. He was re- 
elected in November, 1900, by a large majority. 
In every respect Mr. Brick is an able, conscien- 
tious, vigorous and courteous gentleman. He 
was married November 11, 1884, to Miss Anna 
Meyer, daughter of the late Godfrey E. Meyer, 
and their union has been blessed with a charm- 
ing little daughter. His handsome residence is 
located at No. 745 West Washington street and 
is the abode of comfort, refinement and happi- 
ness. Among men Mr. Brick is a prominent 
figure. He is a member of the Indiana and 
Commercial Athletic Clubs and of the Masons 
and Knights of Pythias orders. He is interest 
ed in the South Bend Land Company, the In- 
diana Street Railway Company and is in a 
number of other enterprises or public and 
private importance. 



HON. MARVIN CAMPBELL. 

Hon. Marvin Campbell, president of the 
Folding Paper Box Company, of this city, 
is a native of this state, and was born at Val- 
paraiso, March 13, 1849. He is a son of Sam- 
uel A. and Harriett (Cornell) Campbell, and 
his father, who is still living at the age of 
seventy-nine years, was a successful farmer. 
Young Campbell was born and reared on a 
farm, where he imbibed all those sturdy char- 
acteristics that have made him a far-seeing 
and successful business man. His early edu- 



108 



SOUTH BEND. 



cation was obtained in the country schools, 
and this was rounded out by a course at the 
Valparaiso Male and Female College. In 1869 
Mr. Campbell taught mathematics in the Val- 
paraiso High School, and in 1870 he accepted 
a similar position at the South Bend High 
School, where he remained two years. He 
gave up teaching in 1872 and engaged in the 
hardware business, where he remained twelve 
years. After disposing of his business he 
became interested in the Mishawaka Woolen 
Manufacturing Company, and is a director 
and treasurer of that company at the present 
time. In 1889 Mr. Campbell entered the em- 
ploy of the Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing 
Company as purchasing agent, which position 
he held until 1893, when he was made man- 



frequently heard at the public meetings of his 
party, and his eloquence is a powerful factor 
with the intelligent voter. His style of ad- 
dress is brilliant, forceful and most convincing. 
Mr. Campbell is one of the best-known busi- 
ness men and most public-spirited citizens of 
South Bend. He is a director of the South 
Bend National Bank, president of the Board 
of Trustees of the Epwoith Hospital and a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married 
in 1874 to Miss Lydia A. Brownfield, a most 
estimable lady, and a daughter of the late 
Hon. John Brownfield. They have three chil- 
dren, John B. Campbell, who is assistant cash- 
ier of the South Bend National Bank and sec- 
retary of the Folding Paper Box Company, 
and Harriet and Rudolph Campbell. His hand- 
some home is at No. 339 West Colfax avenue. 




HON. MAKVIX CAMPBELL. 

ager of the sales department. He retained 
this until January 1, 1899, when he resigned 
to devote his entire time to his present busi- 
ness. In the sessions of 1883 and 18S5 Mr. 
Campbell served in the State Senate as Sen- 
ator from St. Joseph and Starke Counties, 
with honor and credit. He is a forceful public 
speaker and his addresses in the State Sen- 
ate gave remarkable evidence of a thorough 
knowledge of the legislative power, and strong 
presentation of convincing facts. He has been 
chosen as presiding officer at various conven- 
tions, and his knowledge of parliamentary 
law and impartial action invariably compelled 
harmony of action and inspired general es- 
teem. During the campaigns his voice is 



DR. CHARLES A. DAUGHERTY. 

Dr. Charles A. Daugherty lanks justly high 
as a medical practitioner in this city. He is a 
native of Ohio, and was born at Wooster, that 
state, November z'i, 1850. His father, James 
Daugherty, was a prominent citizen, and at one 
time was Sheriff of St. Joseph County. When 
fourteen years of age the parents of young 
Daugherty removed to Madison Township, this 
County, and the young man attended the high 
school at Mishawaka, and the Literary College 
at Hillsdale. Later he taught school for several 
years in this vicinity. He then attended the 
Bennett Medical College at Chicago and gradu- 
ated in the class of 1873. He first located at 
Lakeville, where he practiced his profession 
tour years, after which he attended the Medical 
College of Indiana at Indianapolis, and gradu- 
ated from that institution in 1879. Dr. Daugh- 
erty has kept pace with the onward trend or 
medical science in all its branches. He studied 
in Vienna, and attended the Polytechnic and 
Post-Graduate Colleges of New York, and is 
one of the most successful surgeons in the 
state. Dr. Daugherty was president of the city 
Board of Education for twelve years, and for 
eight years was Pension Examiner for the 
government. He was appointed District Sur- 
geon for the Grand Trunk Railroad, local Sur- 
geon for the Vandalia and Michigan Central 
Railroads, and Chief Surgeon for the Indiana 
Railroad Company. He is also the medical ex- 
aminer for the Mutual Life, the New York Life, 
the Equitable, the Mutual Benefit of New York, 
the Prudential, the Connecticut Mutual, the 
Penn Mutual, the National of Vermont, the 
Aetna, the Massacnusetts Mutual, the Noith- 
western of Milwaukee, and a number of other 
leading life insurance companies. He is also 



SOUTH BEND, 



109 



a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, and the Indiana State, and St. Joseph 
County Medical Societies. Since 1883 Dr. 
Daugherty has been associated with Dr. Frank 
M. Sawyer, and their practice comprises the 
leading families in South Bend and the vicinity. 
Dr. Daugherty is a member of the medical staff 
of the Epworth Hospital and lectures on Sur- 
gery before the Training School for Nurses. 
He was married to Miss Julia Clay, of St. Jo- 
seph County, and has two daughters, Maud C, 
who is married to Mr. Frank Hoffman, of this 
city, and Helen. His residence is at No. 730 
West Washington street. 



HON. ANDREW ANDERSON. 

Mr. Andrew Anderson is the acknowledged 
and honored Dean of the bar of St. Joseph 
County. He is one of the ablest attorneys in 
the west, and the connection of his name with 




ANDBEW ANDERSON. 

a case is at once an evidence of its importance 
and a guarantee of a trial conducted upon the 
highest plane of legal ethics. For over forty 
years Mr. Anderson has been identified witii 
every difficult case which has occupied the 
courts in this judicial district, and he is the 
leader at the bar in this locality. He is a 
native of New York state and was born at 
Whitehall, Washington County. October 6, 
1830. His father, Andrew Anderson, was a 
prominent druggist in that locality and the 
young man had all the advantages of an ex- 



cellent education. He attended Union College 
at Schenectady, N. Y., and afterward took a 
full course of law at the Law School in Albany 
where he graduated in December, 1855. Like 
himself most of his fellow graduates have at- 
tained high reputations as legal practitioners. 
As early as 1849 Mr. Anderson came to South 
Bend but remained only a year when he return- 
ed to his home in the east. In January, 1850, 
however, he located here permanently, and 
from that day to the present he has been an 
indefatigable worker and has never lost a day 
from active business. When the war broke out 
he was the first man in South Bend to offer his 
services to his country, and was elected Cap- 
tain of Company I in the 9th Indiana Volun- 
teers. After honorably serving out his term 
of service he returned to this city and resumed 
his practice. He is an orator of the highest 
type and a forceful speaker both at the bar 
and on the rostrum. In his earlier years his 
services were much sought after in the political 
campaigns, and he was one of the most popular, 
eloquent and convincing speakers in the west. 
While giving his time and talents to the ele- 
vation of the candidate of his party to high and 
responsible offices, Mr. Anderson could never be 
induced to become a candidate himself, and the 
only political position he ever held was in 
the State Legislature in 1863. For ten years 
he was associated with Judge Stanfield, and at 
present he is associated with his son-in-law, 
James DuShane and W. G. Crabill, with offices 
in the new St. Joseph Bank Building. Mr. 
Anderson is still as vigorous and active as a 
young man. His ripened years have only added 
to his store of valuable knowledge and long 
experience and profound study have contribu- 
ted to establish him as the most thoroughly 
equipped attorney in this section of the state. 
He was married to Miss Mary E. Chapin, a 
daughter of Horatio Chapin, a pioneer in In- 
diana. He has two daughters both of whom 
are married. Mr. Anderson is a member of 
Norman Eddy Post, G. A. R., and is one of 
South Bend's most honored citizens, and for 
twenty years has been attorney for the St. 
Joseph County Savings Bank. 



WILLIAM B. CALVERT. 

Mr. William B. Calvert is one of the best 
types of an active and energetic business man. 
and is one of the leading real estate dealers and 
owners in South Bend. Mr. Calvert was born 
October 22, 1863, on a farm at the outskirts 
of this city. His father, Joseph H. Calvert was 
one of the earliest settlers in this locality, 
and his grandfather secured the warrant for the 
old homestead from the United States govern- 



110 



SOUTH BEND. 



merit. After attending the public schools of 
South Bend young Calvert took a business 
course of study at Valparaiso, and after a 
preparatory course at Oberlin College was sent 




WILLIAM I!. C'ALVEKT. 

to Cornell University in New York where he 
entered the department of civil and electrical 
engineering. In 1888 he returned home and hih 
health being impaired he spent a year on his 
father's farm. In 1S89 he engaged in the manu- 
lacture of a patent straw stacker, and in 1894, 
realizing the opportunities for real estate in- 
vestments in South Bend, he decided to engage 
in that vocation, and has successfully contin- 
ued it. He was the chief factor and promoter 
in the sale of Arnold's first and second addi- 
tions to South Bend and Orchard Heights. He 
is the owner of Roseland Park, a beautiful sub- 
division in the southern part of the city, which 
is a model tract, and already improved with 
many handsome residences, and is in popular 
demand. Mr. Calvert is happily married and 
has a family of two bright boys. His wife was 
Miss Ella S. Simcox. of South Bend, and he has 
a handsome home at No. 1012 West Colfax ave- 
nue. When the war broke out with Spain Mr. 
Calvert, as a result of his military training at 
Cornell, was active m the formation of a regi- 
ment of volunteers. He was elected Captain of 
a company and afterwards was made Major of 
the regiment, but it was not called into ser- 
vice and was finally disbanded. Mr. Calvert 
is a director of the Security Life Insurance 
Company of Indiana and is a prominent mem- 
ber of several fraternal organizations, among 



them the Odd Fellows, the Woodmen, the North 
American Union, the Red Men, and the Samari- 
tans. He is a public spirited citizen and has 
done much to extend and advance the best in- 
terests of South Bend. 



JOHN C. KNOBLOCK. 
Mr. John C. Knoblock is one of the pronii- 
rent citizens of South Bend, and has been for 
many years interested in its growth and ad- 
vancement. He :s a native of Canton. Ohio, 
and is a son of Frederick Knoblock, who was 
an Alsatian by biith, ana an experienced 
weaver, who came to America in 1828. In 
1843 the family removed to Indiana and located 
on a farm in Marshall County. Mr. Knoblock 
attended the common schools in Canton and 
South Bend, and afterward was engaged in 
the milling business with A. R. and J. H. 
Harper. He was then engaged as a clerk in 
the grocery house of Michael DeCamp, and 
later engaged in that business himself, under 
the name of J. C. Knoblock & Co. For twenty- 
nine years he was in successful business, and 
his store at No. 62 West Washington street 
was the leading grocery house in the city. In 
1882 Mr. Knoblock retired from active business 
and devoted himself to his various enterprises. 
He was largely interested in the South Bend 




JOHN C. KNOBLOCK. 

Chilled Plow Company, but withdrew from it 
in 1890. He is the president of the Miller- 
Knoblock Electrical Company, manufacturers 
of electrical appliances of every variety, and 



SOUTH BEND, 



111 



which is destined to he one of the most im- 
portant industries in the city. He is also inter- 
ested in the Knoblock-Ginz Milling Company, 
manufacturers of the famous "White Rose" 
flour. He is treasuier of the St. Joseph 
County Savings Bank, and was one of its 
original charter members, but two of whom are 
living. He is a charter member and stock- 
holder of the Citizens National Bank. He was 
always a man of progressive ideas. In 1S65 
he started the first delivery wagon in this city 
and employed the fiist cash girl in South 
Bend. He had the first gas pipes in his resi- 
dence, and had to send to Laporte for men to 
do the work. He was the pioneer in building 
his store without shutters and the first to ex 
cavate under the sidewalk and utilize this 
valuable space. He put down the first drive 
well in South Bend, and laid the first stone 
gutter in front of his store. For four years 
he served as County Commissioner, and was 
a most efficient othcial. For twenty-two years 
prior to the organization of the City Fire De- 
partment he served as a volunteer fireman, 
and on all occasions was enthusiastic in saving 
lives and property. He is also president of 
the DisDrow Liquor Cure, which has done so 
much to cure and reform hundreds who were 
the victims of the alcohol habit. Mr. Knob- 
lock has at all times been one of the most 
public-spirited of citizens, and has contributed 
largely to every, movement that was made for 
the best interests of the city and her people. 
He is an excellent linguist, and has traveled 
extensively in this country and Europe. He 
was married to Miss Lizetta Meyer, who passed 
from this earthly sphere on October 13, 1897. 
and has two children living. His son. Otto 
M. Knoblock, is secretary of the Miller-Knob- 
lock Electrical Company, and his daughter is 
the wife of George W. Reynolds, who is en- 
gaged in the livery business. Mr. Knoblock 
is an ideal citizen, a practical business man in 
the highest sense of the term, and enjoys the 
esteem of the entire community. He resides 
in a handsome home at the southeast corner 
of Lafayette street and Colfax avenue, where 
he has lived for thirty-two years. 



WILLIAM MACK. 

Mr. William Mack, one of the oldest and 
most highly esteemed citizens of South Bend, 
has been a prominent factor in its material 
growth for more than half a century. He was 
born in Hanover, Chautauqua County, New 
York, October 9, 1S2S. He is the son of John 
and Clarissa (Hanford) Mack, who were well 
known in that community. He attended the 



Academy at Fredonia, New York, and in 1844 
his parents removed to this city, where his 
father was engaged in various occupations. He 
attended the public schools here, and then 
learned the trade of a stone, brick and plaster 
mason. He was afterward engaged in the con- 
tracting business, and erected, with others, 
the old Court House, the Odd mellows' Block 
and many other handsome buildings and resi- 
dences. He built the first sewer that was con- 
structed in South Bend, from Lafayette street 
to the race, in 1860. In 1864 he went with the 




X 



<*4 



WILLIAM MACK. 



Studebaker Bros, as cashier, and remained 
there until 1895, when he retired from active 
business, still retaining an interest in the com- 
pany. During the last few years he was au- 
ditor of the company. He is a public-spirited 
citizen, and held the office of trustee under the 
old corporation, was a commissioner two terms, 
and also served as city treasurer. He was a 
member of the Board of Police Commissioners 
for four years. Mr. Mack is a member of the 
Commercial-Athletic Club, and is also frater- 
nally connected with the Masons and Knights 
Templar in this city. He was married to Miss 
Laurette L. Thurber, a native of Laporte Coun- 
ty, who died March 2. 1900, leaving two sons, 
William H. and Walter E. Mr. Mack resides 
at No. 504 North Main street. 



112 



SOUTH BEND 



JAMES IT. LOUGHMAN. 

Mr. James H. Loughnian, senior member of 
the firm of Loughman, Hubbard & Loughman, 
proprietors of the transfer line here and deal- 
ers in coal and wood, with offices at No. 817 




taking business, under the style of Barnhart 
& Loughman. In 1876 he came to South Bend 
with the Lake Shore, and two years later en- 
gaged in the transfer business, at which he 
has continued, and later added the wood and 
coal business, under the present style of firm. 
Mr. Loughman is a business man of the highest 
standing and prominence, and is wall known 
as a progressive and public-spirited citizen. He 
is prominent in social and fraternal life here. 
He was married in 186S to Miss Abbie Cook, 
and resides at No. 725 South Michigan street. 



HENRY C. DRESDEN. 

Mr. Henry C. Dresden, senior member of 
the firm of Dresden & Stanfield, dealers in 
lumber, lath and shingles, at No. 407 Laurel 
street, is a native of this state, and was born 
at Michigan City. December 26. 1849. He was 
the son of Samuel Dresden and Mary (Rexford) 
Dresden. Young Dresden was educated in the 
public schools of his native city, and when he 
had completed his education entered the em- 
ployment of the American Express Company, 
where he remained three years. In 1875 he 
started in the lumber business in the employ 
of the Cutler & Savidge Lumber Company, 



JAMBS II. LOUGHMAN. 

South Main street, is a native of the Buckeye 
State. He was born in Licking County. Ohio, 
October 20, 1845, and is a son of David Lough- 
man and Elizabeth (Martin) Loughman. His 
father was a successful farmer, and he was 
born on the home farm, and was educated in 
the common schools. When the war broke out 
young Loughman was anxious to go to the 
front, and in 1864 he enlisted in Company B. 
One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry and went to the front. In the famous 
battle of North Mountain, in West Virginia. 
Mr. Loughman was made a prisoner by the 
forces under General JuDal A. Early, and was 
sent to Andersonville Prison, where he was 
confined for nearly a year, suffering every pri- 
vation and indignity that the cruelty of the 
rebel commander of that prison could devise, 
and which resulted in the death of thousands 
of patriot soldiers. After his release he was 
discharged at Jacksonville, Florida, in 1S65, 
and came to Mishawaka, where he found em- 
ployment in the George Milburn Wagon Fac- 
tory, where he remained three years. He then 
went with the Lake Shore and Michigan South- 
ern Railroad, where he remained one year. In 
1873 he started in the transfer business at 
Mishawaka, and a year later added the under- 




IIENRY C. DRESDEN. 

where he remained thirteen years, when he 
came to South Bend, and with Mr. H. S. Stan- 
field, organized the firm of Dresden & Stan- 
field, which is still in successful operation, and 



SOUTH BEND. 



113 



is one of the extensive enterprises of the city. 
The office and yards of the firm are conven- 
iently located at the corner of Division and 
Laurel streets, on the line of the Grand Trunk 
Railroad, affording every faculty for handling 
the large business. Mr. Dresden is a business 
man of high standing, and a thoioughly public 
spirited citizen. He was married in 1874 to 
Miss Emma Goodwin, and resides at No. 121 
Chapin street. 



HON. ALBERT M. BURNS. 

Hon. Albert Minis Burns, a member of the 
State Legislature from St. Joseph County, was 
born at Clarion, Clarion County, Pennsylvania, 
November 24, 184^. He comes of Scotch-Iristi 
ancestry, his father, Thomas Burns, who was 
a contractor and builder, having been born In 
Scotland, and his mother, Catherine (Deary) 
Burns, having been born in Eiin. When the 
present Senator was a boy but six years of 
age, his parents moved to Platteville. Wisconsin, 
and it was here that he was educated. He 
attended the public schoo's until he had passed 
his thirteenth year, at which time the civil 
war broke out. Young tiurns, yet a boy in 
knickerbockers, decided to go to the front, and 
two months before he reached the age of four- 
teen he enlisted as a drummer boy in Company 
I, Tenth Wisconsin Infantry. His regiment left 
Milwaukee and went to Louisv lie, Kentucky, 
where it joined O. M. Mitchell's division, ana 
saw active and hard service through Kentucky, 
Tennessee and Alabama. Mr. Burns partici- 
pated in the Huntsville raid, his regiment pre- 
venting reinforcements for Shiloh. After th's 
service he was engaged in guarding the 
Bridges along the M. & C. Railway. In 1862 
his regiment was assigned to the Fourteenth 
Army Corps, Depaitment of the Cumberland, 
under General Thomas. Mr. Burns found ac- 
tive service, following General Bragg In the 
Kentucky raids, from Louisville through East- 
ern Kentucky to Perrysville. where his regi- 
ment took part in that terrible fight, being in 
constant action and suffering heavy losses. He 
next fought in the battles of Stone River, 
Chattanooga and Chickamauga. On Sunday aft- 
ernoon, September 20, 186c>, in the latter battle, 
he was wounded severely, and lay four weeks 
in the hospital. Recovering, he hurried to join 
his regiment and took part for four months in 
the Atlanta campaign under General Sherman. 
Reaching Atlanta with Sherman, the term of 
service of his regiment expired, and it was 
ordered home, and he was discharged at Mad- 
ison. Wisconsin. He then returned to Platte- 
ville, where he remained three months, when 
he reenlisted in Company K, Forty-fourth 



Wisconsin Infantry, and was ordered to Nash- 
ville. He saw hard service through Tennessee 
and Kentucky until the close of the war, when 
he was discharged and returned to Madison. 
Here Governor Lewis, because of gallant serv- 
ices, and because he was the youngest soldier 
with the longest service from the state, bre- 
veted him as Captain. Senator Burns then 
returned to Platteville, where he entered the 
State Normal School to fit himself for a teach- 
er. Here he graduated with high honors in 
1S66. Captain Burns then learned the carriage 
and ornamental painters' trade, and moved to 
Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. In 1S81 he came to 
south Bend and entereu the employ of the 
Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing Company, 




HON. ALBEKT II. BURNS. 

where he remained seven years, when he went 
into business for himself and remained two 
years, rn 1890 he entered the employ of the 
Sandage Steel Skein Company as a clerk, and 
advanced until he reached the position of gen- 
eral superintendent, wnich position he now 
holds. Senator Burns is a type of a reliant, 
progressive, self-made man. With a careful 
education, clear conception and a determina- 
tion to advance, he is a logical leader. Since 
ne same to this city he has been a prudent 
and clear judgment have made him revered by 
and clear judgment has made him revered by 
the men who toil, as well as employers. He 
was treasurer of the Central Labor Union here 
for four years. Since 1S60 Mr. Burns has been 
a Republican in politics. As a boy he was 



114 



SOUTH BEND, 



captain of the Junior Wide Awake Club of 
Platteville. and participated in the Lincoln cam- 
paign. In 1894 Senator Burns was an unsuc- 
cessful candidate for the nomination for State 
Senator. In 1S98 he was again a candidate, 
was nominated and elected by a vote that 
proved his popularity in labor and other circles. 
He has served two years of the four to which 
he was elected, and his puolic record is un- 
stained. He is one ot the most active and 
forceful men in the Senate Chamber. His ac- 
tivity is shown when it is known that a law 
had to be passed to consolidate the charters 
of the various street railways in South Bend 
in order 10 enable the company to issue suffi- 
cient bonds for extensions and improvements. 
The matter was presented to Senator Burns 
late in the session. He prepared a bill, and 
the constitutional rule was suspended by his 
colleagues, the bill was passed and the Gov- 
ernor signed it, making it a law. This unusual 
proceeding shows in what regard Senator 
Burns is held by his colleagues. Senator 
Burns is a public speaker who commands at- 
tention ana presents most convincing argu- 
ments. With a carefully modulated and trained 
voice, he ranks among the foremost as an ora- 
tor and speaker, and his services are always 
in demand and given in national and state 
campaigns. Since the close of the war Senator 
Burns uas been connected witn the G. A. R., 
and filled the position of Adjutant General of 
the order in Wisconsin. Senator Burns was 
married in 1870 to Miss Bessie L. Whitaker, a 
native of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and, with 
his estimable wife and family of four children, 
resides at No. 131 Paris street. 



in this line. In 18S7. with Mr. Barney C. 
Smith, the firm of Smith & Jackson was or- 
ganized and started in business. The firm has 
one of the largest retail yards in the city The 
plant comprises yards, office, sheds, factory and 
a large planing mill equipped with steam power 
and modern machinery- The firm deals in lum- 




C'HARLES 11. JACKSON. 

ber. lath, shingles, sash, doors, blinds and all 
kinds of builders' mill work and lumber. Mr. 
Jackson is a business man of high standing 
and prominence and is widely known. He is 
a member of the Elks and is popular in social 
life and highly esteemed. 



CHARLES H. JACKSON. 



Mr. Charles H. Jackson, a member of the 
firm of Smith & Jackson, dealers in lumber, 
etc., No. 609 Michigan Avenue, is a native of 
the Hoosier state and was born in Union Town- 
ship, St. Joseph County, February 1. 1867. Mr. 
Jackson is a son of Mr. Newton Jackson, a 
well known lumber dealer and saw mill owner, 
who is highly esteemed here as a business 
man and citizen, and Caroline (Deppeni 
Jackson. When he was but four years of 
age his parents removed to a farm near Go- 
shen, where they lived about two years 
and then moved to Mishawaka. In 1S75 the 
family came to South Bend. Young Jackson 
was educated in the schools of Mishawaka. 
and this city, and when he had completed his 
education he engaged in the lumber business 
with his father and has always been engaged 



HOWARD S. STANFIELD. 

Mr. Howard S. Stanfieid, of the well-known 
firm of Dresden & Stanfieid, is a native of South 
Bend, and one of its most honored citizens and 
business men. He was born in this city, April 
17. 1846. He is the son of Judge Thomas S. 
Stanfieid and Nancy (Peebles) Stanfieid. Mr. 
Stanfieid was educated in the public schools 
of this city, and in 1864, in company with a 
number of local friends, crossed the plains to 
California in a wagon drawn by a mule team, 
a journey which occupied five months. He 
stopped at Marysville, California, for a short 
time, and then went to San Francisco, from 
which city he returned east to New York by 
steamship, by way of the Isthmus of Panama. 
He left on April 14, 1865, the day on which 



SOUTH BEND. 



115 



President Lincoln was assassinated, but did 
not hear of this national calamity until the 
reached Panama. On arriving in New York 
they found the city in mourning, and every 
indication of general sorrow and distress. He 
returned to South Bend and for two years was 
engaged in the dry goods business with John 
Dunn and Horace Van Tuye, under the firm 
name of Dunn & Co., and then sold out his in- 
terest to his partners. In 1869 he established 
himself in the lumber business at Main and 
Division streets, and in 18S3 he sold out to the 
Cutler & Savidge Lumber Company, with Mr. 
H. C. Dresden, his present associate, as man- 
ager. In 1887 the present firm of Dresden & 
Stanfield succeeded the company and has been 




HOWARD s. STANFIELD. 

engaged in active business since. The firm 
deals in lumber, lath, shingles, sash, doors, 
blinds and builders' supplies, and its business 
is local and through the surrounding country. 
The yards are at Division and Laurel streets, 
on the Grand Trunk Railway. Mr. Stanfield 
is an honorable, progressive and successful 
mei chant, and is a gentleman who has won 
the esteem of the community in which he re- 
sides. He was married in 1870 to Miss Flora 
L. Turner, a South Bend lady, and resides in 
a pleasant home, on the same lot where he 
was born, at No. 311 west Washington street. 
He is a member of the Commercial-Athletic 
Club, and takes a deep interest in all that con- 
serves the best interests of the city of his 
birth. 



FREDERICK H. BADET. 

Mr. Frederick H. Badet, secretary and treas- 
urer of the South Bend Toy Company, the 
largest manufacturing enterprise of its special 
kind in the world, is a native of the Nutmeg 
State, having been born in New London, Con- 
necticut, August 30, 1848. Mr. Badet was a son 
of Henry S. and Elizabeth H. Badet, his father 
having been engaged in the grocery business 
in his native city. Mr. Badet was educated 
in the public and high schools at New London, 
and when he was twenty-five years of age 
came to South Bend, where he has since re- 
sided and been engaged in active and success- 
ful business. When he first came heie he 
engaged as a clerk for John C. Knob'.ock, 
where he continued until 1874, when he en- 
tered into partnership with Mr. John W. Teel 
in the manufacture of toys, under the style of 
Teel & Badet. Gradually the business grew 
and expanded until in 1883 the South Bend Toy 
Company was organized and incorporated with 
Mr. Teel as president ana Mr. Badet as secre- 
tary and treasurer, which positions he now 
fills. Mr. Badet is a business man of con- 
servative and yet energetic methods, and is a 
public-spirited citizen. He was married in 
1876 to Miss Harriet Spencer, of New London, 
Connecticut. 



IRVING A. SIBLEY. 

Mr. Irving A. Sibley, president of the Mal- 
leable Steel Range Manufacturing Company, 
and dealer in hardware, is a native of the 
Empire State, and was born at Collins, Erie 
County, June 27, 1852. He was a son of Dr. 
William A. Sibley and Margery Jane Churchill. 
When but eight years of age his father died, 
and two years later the boy went to Boston, a 
village near Buffalo, where he resided with 
his grandparents for three years. Young 
Sibley received his education in the district 
schools at Collins and Boston, and attended 
school one year in the City of Buffalo. When 
fourteen years of age he began his actual career 
as a shoe salesman in a Buffalo store, and 
at the age of seventeen started on the road 
selling goods for a Buffalo house. In No- 
vember, 1871, Mr. Sibley engaged in the manu- 
facture of shirts at Buffalo, where he built 
up a large and successful business. January 
1, 1875, he engaged with the wholesale boot 
and shoe house of C. M. Henderson & Co., 
of Chicago, as a traveling salesman, and for 
ten years toured through Minnesota and Da- 
kota. In 1882 be bought a three-quarter inter- 
est in the Deuel County Bank, at Gary, South 
Dakota, and three years later sold his in- 
terest in the bank, resigned as a traveling sales- 



116 



SOUTH BEND. 



man and came to South Bend and purchased 
the hardware business of France & Gish, 
which he still conducts, and which has grown 
largely under his able direction. The premises 




"V 



T^r 



IRVINc; A Mlil.KY. 



occupied are a large double store and three- 
story building, the stock including everything 
in the line of light and heavy hardware, 
cutlery, stoves, ranges, tools, etc. Mr. Sibley 
is one of our most progressive and active 
business men and enterprising citizens. He 
was one of the organizers and first vice presi- 
dent of the Citizens National Bank. Janu- 
ary 1, 1899, the Malleable Steel Range Manu- 
facturing Company of this city was organized, 
with Mr. Sibley as presilent. He is a gentle- 
man of the highest standing and integrity, and 
is widely known. Mr. Sibley was married in 
1872 at Buffalo, New York, to Miss Cora E. 
Curtis, of that city, and resides in a handsome 
home at No. 1018 East Jefferson street. 



EMANUEL R. WILLS 

Among the prominent citizens of South Bend 
who have ably and honorably fulfilled the 
duties of public positions of responsibility and 
trust is Mr. Emanuel R. Wills, who for more 
than a third of a century has been an es- 
teemed resident and business man of this city. 
Mr. Wills is a native of Pennsylvania, and was 
born in York County, of that state. October i, 
1840. He is the son of Lewis Wills and Mag- 
deline (Fleshman) Wills, both of whom were 



well known in that section of the Keystone 
state. Mr. Wills was educated in Pennsyl- 
vania, and for a time he assisted his father 
on the farm. Of a naturally modest and retir- 
ing disposition, Mr. Wills nevertheless was 
ambitious to succeed in life, and believing that 
the west offered a wider field of endeavor than 
those of his native state, he came to South 
Bend in 1S65 where he engaged himself as a 
clerk in a dry goods store. Later he embarked 
in the grocery business on his own account, but 
after about five years' experience in that line, 
he returned to the dry goods business which he 
found more congenial. In 1882 his name w:\s 
mentioned in connection with the City treasur- 
ership. and without any solicitation on his part 
he was elected to that reponsible office. He 
ably fulfilled the duties of the position for two 
years, and in 1884 was named as a candidate 
for County Treasui er of St. Joseph County and 
elected. Again he demonstrated his marked 
abilities as a fiduciary official, and on the ex- 
piration of his first term was elected to suc- 
ceed himself, an honor rarely accorded to any 
public official. In every respect Mr. Wills jus- 
tified the esteem and favor of his fellow citi- 
zens, and his conduct of the office was in the 
highest degree most honorable and courteous. 
In 1891 he was selected as County Assessor, 
and brought to that office the high degree of 




EMANUEL H. WILLS. 

business honor and equitable dealing which has 
marked his incumbency of other political posi- 
tions. Mr. Wills is now engaged in the insur- 
ance business and is very popular in the com- 



SOUTH BEND 



117 



munity. He is a gentleman of high business 
probity and honor and has won hosts of friends 
in this city He was married in 1874 to Miss 
Margaret Coquillard, a daughter of Benjamin 
and Sophia Coquillard, of this city, and has a 
family of four children, two boys, Leo J. and 
Edmund A., and two daughters, Florentine M. 
and Adele M. Wills. Mr. Wills' residence is 
located at No. 128 South Taylor street. 



J. Q. C. VAN DEN BOSCH. 
For more than half a century Mr. James Q. 
C. van den Bosch has been an honored resident 
of South Bend, and has been prominently iden- 
tified w.th its material growth and advance- 
ment. He is now in his seventy-seventh year 
and still enjoys most excellent health and 
vigor. Mr. van den Bosch is a native of Hol- 
land, and was born October 17, 1824. He is the 
son of iman Walter Jacob van den Bosch and 
Cornellia Adriana (.Kakebeeke) van den Bosch. 
His father was an extensive landed proprietor 
in his native country and was the owner of 
nearly 4,000 acres of valuable farming land 
which was known as the "Wilhelmina Embank- 
ment" He was a scientific agriculturist and 
rendered distinguished service to his country, 
both in a civil capacity and as a military offi- 
cer in the Belgian Revolution, andj other his- 
toric events in Holland He was the recipient 
of a number of medals of honor for his dis- 
tinguished services, and these decorations are 
highly prized by his son, who now possesses 
them. Mr. van den Bosch was educated in the 
Moravian College at Lauzanne, and alter his 
graduation spent nearly three years on his fa- 
ther's estate engaged in agricultural manage- 
ment. In 1848 he came to America, and for 
nearly two yeais was engaged in the hardware 
business in Buffalo, N. Y. In 1849 he came to 
South Bend, which then had a population of 
only about 1,200. Here he was engaged with 
Leonard Harris in the general store located at 
the southeast corner of Michigan and Washing- 
ton streets. After a short time he went to Green 
Bay to assist in the formation of a Moravian 
settlement on a large tract of land, once owned 
by John Jacob Astor, where he remained ono 
year, and in 1852 he journeyed to California 
and Oregon. He first settled in Douglas 
County, Oregon, and here remained ten years 
engaged in mining and fighting hostile Indians. 
and his estimable wife taught the first school 
in Southern Oregon. He then went to central 
Nevada prospecting for silver which he dis- 
covered in large deposits, and after three years 
disposed of his properties to the Manhattan 
Silver Mining Company, which is still working 
the mines which have proved exceptionally 



rich and valuable. In 1865 Mr. van den Bosch 
was afflicted with quicksilver poisoning and he 
retired from business and with his family made 
an extended tour of Europe and visited his na- 
tive land. On his return he settled in St. Jo- 
seph County, and for several years, in connec- 
tion with his son, John Walter, who died in 
1898, was engaged in several manufacturing in- 
dustries in South Bend and Mishawaka, among 
which was the Bissell Chilled Plow Company 
and the Roper Furniture Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He is the owner of valuable real estate 
in South Bend, and of several extensive farms 
in this county, known as "Nutwood," and still 
takes an active interest in the management of 
his affairs. In 1851 Mr. van den Bosch was 
married to Miss Mary Jane Smith, a native of 




J. Q. C. VAN DEN BOSCH. 

Lynchburg, Va., and a daughter of the late Col. 
John Smith, who was one of the oldest settlers 
in St. Joseph County. His family consists of 
three daughters, Mrs. Sarah Beiger, wife of 
Henry Beiger of Mishawaka; Mrs. Alice Stude- 
baker, wife of Clem W. Studebaker and Miss 
Cornelia Adriana van den Bosch who resides at 
home. Mr. van den Bosch was a skilled engi- 
neer and chemist and studied metallurgy, geol- 
ogy, analytical chemistry and kindred sciences, 
both at Lauzanne and ai Clausthal, in Saxony. 
He was always a man of progressive ideas, of 
tireless energy and high honor, and in the even- 
ing of his life he is in the enjoyment of a 
competence and the regard and esteem of his 
friends and the community. He also bears the 



118 



SOUTH BEND 



proud distinction of being a great grandfather. 
With his esteemed wife and daughter he resides 
at No. 529 West Washington street. 



JOSEPH H. HIBBERD. 

Mr. Joseph H. Hibberd. now retired iron 
active business, is an honored citizen of South 
Bend and is well known in this community 
Mr. Hibberd is a native of New York State, and 



handsome home at No. 509 West Washington 
street, and has resided there ever since. Mr. 
Hibberd was married November 1, 1854, in 
Syracuse, N. Y., to Miss Helen A. Baldwin, of 
Indiana, and who was reared in the Onondaga 
Valley, in New York, who died in South Bend, 
January 1, 1901. His family consists of three 
children, Mi. John A. Hibberd, a prominent at- 
torney of this city; Mr. Charles B. Hibberd, the 
well-known printer, and Mrs. Grace Hill, wife of 
Fred. C. Hill, a prominent attorney of Owego. 
N. Y. Mr. Hibberd is in the enjoyment of 
vigorous health and takes a deep interest in 
public affairs. 




JOSEPH II. HlIiBEKD. 

was born in the Onondaga Valley. January 19, 
1827. He is the son of Cyprian Hibberd, a well- 
known contractor, who came from Hebron, 
Connecticut, to New Yo.k in 1802, and Char- 
lotte (Hurd) Hibberd. Mr. Hibberd's boyhood 
was passed on the farm, and he attended the 
famous Academy at Onondaga. After working 
on the farm for a short time, he followed the 
sea for three years, and made several whaling 
voyages fraught with exciting experiences and 
dangers. He sailed the Pacific Ocean and the 
Behring Sea, and made a trip around the woild. 
In 1852 he went to California and spent two 
years in mining, and in the teaming business in 
Marysville. He then returned to his home in 
New York on account of ill health, and in 1807 
he removed to South Bend, where his sister, the 
late Mrs. Mary E. Hibberd Adams, resided, 
and here he decided to remain. He bought the 
property at Chapin and Washington streets m 
1S82 where Mr. Joseph D. Ol ver's handsome 
residence now stands, and lived there about 
eleven years. In 1895 he erected his present 



R. H. MURDOCK. 

Among the leading citizens of South Bend, 
and one who was for years prominently identi- 
fied with the commercial advancement of this 
city, must be mentioned the name of Mr. Raw- 
son H. Murdock, whose lamented death occurred 
on October 14, 1S9S. Mr. Murdock was a native 
of New York, and was born in Yates County, 
of that state, in 1817. He attended the schools 
in the vicinity until he was sixteen years of 
age, when he engaged in the hardware business 
in which he remained for several years. He 
then embarked in the banking business at 




11. C H. Ml'liDOIE. 

Lyons, N. Y., with Mr. S. B. Gavitt, a promi- 
nent banker of that city. Mr. Murdock and 
Mr. Gavitt also erected the gas works in Lyons 
and conducted its affairs for many years. Mr. 



SOUTH BEND. 



119 



Murdoch was engaged In the banking business 
in Lyons for seventeen years, when he removed 
to Clinton, Iowa, whei e he conducted the same 
business and that of the Clinton Lumber Com- 
pany, until 1877. During that year he came to 
South Bend and estaDlished himself in the hard- 
ware business in this city. For twenty years 
he was a prominent mercnant in his line of 
business, and won a high and honorable repu- 
tation in the community. He was one of the 
most charitable of men, and during his life 
was endeared to a large circle of friends, and 
nis life was one of usefulness and high en- 
deavor. He was for years a leading member 
of the First Presbyterian church of this city. 
On January 24, 1845, Mr. Murdock was married 
to Miss Eliza A. Weich, a daughter of the Rev. 
B. T. Welch, of Rushviile, N. Y., and this esti- 
mable lady was a most devoted wife and moth- 
er, until death claimed her, on September 24, 
1898, but a few weeks before her husband was 
called from the caies of earth. Mrs. Murdock's 
life was devoted to the care of her household, 
and to numerous and unremitting acts cf kind- 
ness and benevoience to those whose lives 
were clouded by sorrow and adversity. She 
was the organizer and a warm supporter of the 
Orphans' Home at Mishawaka, and for years 
was the director of tne Ladies' Relief Society 
of this city. Mrs. Murdock was always promi- 
nent in church work and, like her husband 
was a member of the Fast Presbyterian church. 
Her mission in life seemed to be to cheer, ana 
sympathize with the afflicted and to imbue 
with brighter hopes and nobler inspirations all 
who came within the sphere of her beneficial 
influence. Mr. and Mrs. Murdock left three 
children surviving them, Mr. Charles H. Mur- 
dock and Mrs. John Layton, of this city, and 
Mrs. L. H. Sanford, of Mount Vernon, N. Y. 



cabinet making. In 1S32 he was married to 
Miss Lucinda Welch, and in 1835 the young 
couple located in South Bend. His first home 
was a log house on St. Joseph street, and here 
he commenced business by making bedsteads. 
He was successful and soon purchased a lot 
on Lafayette street, and erected a home which 
is still standing. He next purchased a lot on 
North Michigan street and built a store and 
shop, and started in the furniture and under- 
taking business. Mr. Price was a genial gentle- 
man and always interested in the growth oi' 
the city. He was one of the earliest members 
of South Bend Lodge, No. 29. I. 0. 0. F., and it 



BENJAMIN F. PRICE, SR. 
Mr. Benjamin F. Price, Sr., whose death oc- 
curred on October 16, 1S87, was one of the ven- 
erable and venerated citizens of South Bend, 
whose earthly departure was a source of gen- 
eral sorrow and regret. For over half a cen- 
tury Mr. Price was identified with the growth 
and development of this city, as a business 
man and public spirited citizen, and he was 
warmly esteemed by hosts of friends. He 
died at the age of eighty years after a life of 
activity, usefulness and honor. Mr. Price was 
a native of Virginia and was born near the 
historic city of Winchester, September 30, 1807. 
When he was quite young his paients removed 
to Pennsylvania and located near Uniontown, 
and here he was apprenticed to the trade of 




V 







B. P. PBIC'E, SR. 

is to him and Mr. C. W. Martin that the 
fraternity of this city is indebted for the hand- 
some Odd Fellows building at Main and Wash- 
ington sti eets. His wife died May 6, 1859. She 
was the mother of seven children. His oldest 
son. Capt. C. W. Price, was killed by accident 
during the war of the rebellion. Mrs. Sarah 
Hart, a daughter, is now living; John Price and 
a daughter who became Mrs. Lizzie Miles are 
now deceased; Mrs. Clara Leib, another daugh- 
ter, is now living, and Benjamin F. Price, a 
son, is now a successful undertaker in this city. 
The youngest son, Eddie, died when quite 
young. Mr. Price's death was mourned by 
a large circle of friends to whom he was en- 
deared by years of association and compan- 
ionship He had lived a life of honor crowned 



120 



SOUTH BEND. 



with, success, and his declining years were 
passed amid the love of his children and grand- 
children and the warm esteem of the entire 
community. 



CHARLES ARTHUR CARLISLE. 

Mr. cnanes Arthur Carlisle, who is a direc- 
tor and purchasing agent of ihe Studeoaker 
Bros. Manufacturing Company of this city, has 
been connected with tne company tor several 
years and is well and prominently known in 
this community. Mr. cariisie is a native of 
Uhio, and comes 01 a long une ot honorable 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. He is the son of 
.ueade Woodson Clay CaniSie and crania Vale- 
ria (.Ban j canisie, and was boin at Chiui- 
cothe, 0., May 4, 1864. His father was born in 
the same city October 2t>, 1S2S, and his mother 
was a native of Wiimingion, Del. His father 
was extensively engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness and owned large tracts of land in that sec- 
tion of the state. Dunng tne Rebellion he was 
an officer of the 31st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and honorably served during that historic 
struggle. He afterward engaged in commercial 
pursuits. He is still living, and with his esti- 
mable wife now resides at Evanston, 111. Mr. 
Carlisle's great grandfatner, Andrew Carlisle, 
was a native of the County l yrone, Ire, and. He 
came to America in li81 and first located in 
Pennsylvania, but in 1789 he removed to Chili- 
cothe, O., then the capital of the state, and an 
impoitant Ind.an trading post. Here he resided 
until 1821, when he and his wife both died. His 
grandfather was John Carlisle, Br., a christian 
and public spirited gentleman who was an inti- 
mate friend of Henry Clay and General Wilian 
H. Harrison. He also resided in Chilicothe, 
and diea there July 19, 1847. Mr. Charles Ar- 
thur Carlisle received his early education un- 
der private tutors and in 1SS3 entered the ser- 
vice of the Marietta & Cincinnati Railway. 
He remained here one year and then devoted 
himself to journalism on the Ohio State Jour- 
nal for a year, and from 1885 to 1S88 occupied 
several responsible positions with the Nickel 
Plate Hailroad. In 1888 he connected himself 
with the Toledo & Ohio Central Railway, as 
private secretary and general manager, and 
was located at Toledo, O. He was afterward 
private secretary and purchasing agent of the 
same road. From 1890 to 1891 he was the pur- 
chasing agent of the Toledo & Ohio Central, and 
Toledo, Columbus & Cincinnati Railways, and 
from 1S91 to 1892 he was the purchasing agent 
of the Burke system, which comprised the two 
above named roads and the Kanawha «fc Michi- 
gan railways. In 1892 he came to South Bend 
and from that date to tne present has been the 



assistant general manager and purchasing 
agent of the Chicago & South Bend railroad, 
and its treasurer since February 1, 1893. Mr. 
Carlisle has been connected with the Studebaker 
Bros. Manufacturing Company since 1892, and 
has proven a most valuable, progressive and 
energetic official. He is a member of the direc- 
tory, the purchasing agent, and chairman of 
the advertising and traffic committee of the 
company, which in addition to the mammoth 
plant in this city has established branches in 
New York, Chicago. Kansas City, Springfield, 
Mo., Salt Lake City, Duluth, San Francisco 
and Portland, Oregon. He is also secretary of 




CHABLES AKTHl'Il CARLISLE, 

the South Bend Fuel and Gas Company, ami 
was the vice president of the National Real 
Estate Association of America. He is the sec- 
retary of the Scotch-Irish Society of America 
for the state of Indiana, a member of the exec- 
utive committee of the National Carriage 
Builders' Association, and the Indiana Manu- 
facturers' Association. Among the social or- 
ganizations of which he is a member are the 
Sphinx Club of New York; the Columbia Club, 
of Indianapolis; the Chicago Athletic Club; the 
Indiana Club of this city, and he is president 
of the Country Ciub of the St. Joseph Valley. 
He was a member of Governor Mount's staff, 
with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and is an 
active official member of the Milburn Memorial 
M. E. church of this city. Mr. Carlisle was 
married September 17, 1891, to Miss Anna Stu- 
debaker, only daughter of Hon. and Mrs. Clem 



SO U T H BEND 



121 



Studebaker, one of the founders and the presi- 
dent of the Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing 
Company. Mrs. Carlisle is a lady of wide cul- 
ture and refinement, and their family consists 
of four charming and interesting children, 
Annie, Charles Arthur Jr., Kathryn and Wood- 
son Studebaker. His beautiful and luxurious 
home is located on South Taylor street, and he 
has collected one of the most extensive and 
best selected libraries owned by a private in- 
dividual. Mr. Carlisle and his estimable wife 
are most popular in social circles in this and 
other cities, and devote themselves largely to 
works of benevolence and charity. Among the 
treasures of his home are numerous testimoni- 
als, records, and other memorials bearing tri- 
bute to the deeds and accomplishments of his 
ancestors. Personally Mr. Carlisle is a thoro- 
ughly progressive American, who has won 
hosts of warm friends, and enjoys the esteem 
of the entire community. 



JAMES DU SHANE. 

Mr James Du Shane, of the prominent law 
firm of Anderson, Du Shane & Crabill, is a 
successful practitioner at the local bar, and is 
a patent solicitor of rare ability and high repu- 
tation. He is a native of Pittsburg, Pa., and 
was born in that city Sepcemoer 22, 1847. His 
father, Samuel P. Du Shane, was a well known 
business man in Pittsburg, and Brownsville, 
Pa., and the young man received his early edu 
cation in the public schools of that section of 
the Keystone state, and at the Academy at 
Canaan, Ohio. He afterward attended the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and graduated from the 
literary department of that institution in 1869. 
He came to South Bend in 1872 and assumed 
the position of assistant in the nigh school and 
was afterwards principal of the school from 
1875 to 1878. In 1879 he was appointed superin- 
tendent of schools and served in that responsi- 
ble position until 1891, a period of twelve years. 
Mr. Du Shane has been connected with the pub- 
lic schools of South Bend for twenty-one years, 
and helped largely to develop the cause of edu- 
cation and laid the foundation for the excellent 
systems and high standing of the South Bend 
public schools of the present day. During this 
time he studied law in the office of Mr. Andrew 
Anderson and was admitted to practice in 189:! 
He is an able patent attorney and confines his 
practice to that branch of the law, and is an 
authority on all matters pertaining to the law 
of patents. Mr. Du Shane was one of the origi- 
nators of the present splendid Public Library, 
and aided materially in securing the legisla- 
tion from the general assembly providing for 
the creation and maintenance of Public Libra- 



ries from the general tax levy He was the 
first secretary of the library when it was lo- 
cated in the upper floor oi the Oliver Opera 
House, and still holds that position He is also 
entrusted with the delicate and responsible 
task of purchasing the books for that institu- 
tion. Mr. Du Shane has the distinction of be- 
ing the first man to introduce electricity for 
lighting purposes in this city He organized 
the South Bena Electric Company and was the 
secretary of that corporation from 1882 till 
1S99. He is also secretary of the South Bend 
Power Company, which i roposes to build n 




JAMES DUSHANE. 

dam across the St. Joseph river, near the state 
line, for the development of electric power, and 
its transmission to this city for use for manu- 
facturing purposes. Mr. Du Shane has always 
been a public spirited citizen and has been 
interested in a number of measures having foi 
their object the general good of the city. He 
is well known and highly esteemed in the com- 
munity. He was married to Miss Emma An- 
derson, a daughter of his law associate, Andrew 
Anderson, and has a family of four boys and 
two girls. His home is located at No. 720 
Park avenue. 



LOUIS NICKEL, JR. 

Mr. Louis Nickel, Jr., the popular business 
man and restaurateur of this city, is a native 
of Bavaria, Germany, where he was born April 
13, 1846. He is the son of Louis Nickel and 



122 



SOUTH BEND 



Eva (Dietz) Nickel. When he was but eight 
years of age his mother died, and three years 
later his father decided to come to America, 
and with his son, sailed on the clipper sailing 




I, ill tS Nil M-.l.. JR. 

ship "Exchange," which made the journey 
from Havre, France to New York in thirty-five 
days, which, at that time, was considered a 
quick voyage. Mr. Nickel's father was a talent- 
ed musician and made his home for several 
years in New York, where he was a member 
of some of the most famous musical organiza- 
tions there, including Gilmore's Concert Band, 
and the Theodore Thomas Orchestra. Y'oung 
Nickel had the advantages of a good education, 
and improved it. When he was through school 
he learned the trade of a tinsmith with his 
uncle, and also learned the jeweler's trade. 
While working at this he attended night school 
at Cooper Institute in New York. After three 
years he went to Patterson, N. J., where he 
was employed in the Rogers Locomotive Works. 
In the meantime his father had gone to South 
Bend, and in 1870, young Nickel joined his 
father in this city, and found employment with 
the Singer Sewing Machine Company. He 
next went with the Oliver Plow Company 
where he remained over three years, when he 
purchased a half interest in the Rockstroh 
bakery and grocery, his partner being Mr. 
George J. Rockstroh, and the immense business 
now conducted under the firm name of L. 
Nickel, Jr., & Co. has resulted. Mr. Nickel 
is one of South Bend's most advanced and pro- 



gressive business men and public spirited citi- 
zens. The hotel, restaurant and grocery con- 
ducted by the firm is the largest and most 
completely fitted and stocked in this section, 
and the trade is among the best people. Mr. 
Nickel holds a high place in social and frater- 
nal life here, being a prominent Mason, Odd 
Fellow and Elk, and a member of the Turner's 
Society. He was married in 1871 to Miss Kate 
Rockstroh. 



SAMUEL T. APPLEGATE. 

Mr. Samuel T. Applegate enjoys the reputa- 
tition of being the oldest and one of the most 
popular and thorough druggists in South Bend. 
He has been engaged in this business since 
1S57, when a boy of sixteen years of age, he 
came to this city to make his first venture in 
the world, and he has been remarkably suc- 
cessful. He was born near Bordentown, in 
Burlington County, New Jersey, March 7, 1841, 
and had the misfortune to lose his father, 
Thomas Taylor Applegate, when he was but 
three years of age. At the age of seven years 
he removed to Philadelphia, Penn., with his 
mother, arid in 1857 he came to South Bend. 
In 1S58 he was engaged in the drug store of Mr 
Albert G. dishing, as a clerk, and later pur- 




-<■-— 




SAMl'EL T. APPLEGATE. 



chased an interest in the business and the firm 
was then known as Cushing & Co. In January, 
1897, Mr. Cushing retired from the business 
and Mr. Applegate purchased his interest and 



SOUTH BEND. 



123 



became the sole proprietor. In 1860 Mr. Apple- 
gate went to Pike's Peak, Colorado, and was 
engaged in gold mining for about eight months 
with satisfactory success. In 1864 he was ap- 
pointed as clerk to Major Ethan S. Reynolds, 
who was a paymaster during the Rebellion, 
and he served in this position until the close of 
the war, his services not ending until Decem- 
ber, 1865. Mr. Applegate is a gentleman of 
quiet habits, courteous in his manner, and has 
won for himself the high regard of the entire 
community, while his handsomely appointed 
store at the corner of Michigan and Washing- 
ton streets is one of the most popular stores 
in the city. Mr. Applegate is a widower, his 
estimable wife having died some four years 
ago, and he has a family of three children. 
His residence is at No. 315 North Michigan 
street. 



JACOB WOOLYERTON. 

Mr. Jacob Woolverton, the president of the 
St. Joseph County Savings Bank, and a mem- 
ber of the real estate firm of Kizer & Woolver- 
ton, is a native of this county, and was born in 
Warren. Township, September 3, 1845. His 
father, Charles Woolverton, was a resident of 
Hamilton County, Ohio, but came to Indiana 




JACOB WOOLVERTON. 



Woolveiton was but seven years of age, his 
father died, and the young man received his 
early education during the winter months in 
the district schools. In 1864 ne came to South 
Head, after whicn he attended Northern In- 
diana College for two years, and then took a 
thorough course in Eastman s Business College. 
Then he spent a short time in travel, and re- 
turned to this city and engaged himself with 
Col. Norman Eddy, who was collector of In- 
ternal Revenue tor this district. On leaving 
this position he was a traveling salesman for 
an on firm at Cleveland tor a short time, and 
then entered tne counting room of Studebaker 
Bros., as a bookkeeper. Realizing the great 
possioilities of success in dealing in real estate 
in this vicinity, Mr. Woolverton, on June 10, 
1869, formed a partnership with William L. 
Kizer, who was associated with him in the 
revenue collection department, and these two 
young men started upon a career which has 
earned success The operations of the firm are 
most extensive and in addition to their import- 
ant transactions in real estate, the firm loans 
large amounts of money on property in In- 
diana, Ohio and Michigan, and have an exten- 
sive clientage among the wealthy and influen- 
tial citizens of this county. Mr. Woolverton 
has never sought political preferment, but has 
always taken an active part in the political 
campaigns and has been selected as treasurer 
of the Republican Central Committee on vari- 
ous occasions. He is also interested in a num- 
ber of business enterprises of an important 
character and is one of the most progressive 
and public spirited of men. He is a stockholder 
and vice president of the St. Joseph Loan & 
Trust Company, and the president of the St. 
Joseph County Savings Bank, and for years 
occupied the position of vice president of that 
institution. He is also the treasurer of the 
Malleable Steel Range Manufacturing Com- 
pany. In October, 1870, he was married to Miss 
Alice M. Rupei, and with his family resides 
in a handsome nome at No. 313 South Lafayette 
street. 



in 1841, and settled in Warren Township. He 
was very successful in the purchase and sale 
of farming lands, and was highly esteemed by 
his neighbors and friends In 1852, when Jacob 



HON. TIMOTHY E. HOWARD. 

Among the many prominent members of the 
bar of St. Joseph County, no one is held in 
higher esteem or occupies a more honorable 
position in the community than that able jurist, 
wise counsellor, and distinguished advocate, 
ex-judge Timothy E. Howard, who is one of the 
best equipped attorneys practicing at the local 
bar. Mr. Howard was born near Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, January 27, 1837. His father, Martin 
Howard, was a well-to-do farmer and the 
young man was given an excellent education. 



124 



SOUTH BEND. 



He attended the county schools and the Ypsi- 
lanti Union School, and then entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he remained until 
the middle of the sophomore year. He then at- 



have received universal commendation. He re- 
cently made a compilation of the Statutes of 
Indiana which has been favorably received by 
the public. He is a past commander of Auten 
Post, No. 8, G. A. K. Judge Howard was mar- 
ried to Miss Julia A. Redmond, of Detroit, 
Mich., and eight children have been born to 
them. He resides at No. 714 East Cedar street. 




HON. TIMOTHY E. HOWARD. 

tended the University of Notre Dame, where he 
combined with his studies a professorship in 
Mathematics, Eng.ish Literature, Latin and 
Greek, and graduated in 1862, remaining with 
the college as an instructor. Mr. Howard en- 
listed in the 12th Michigan Volunteeis, but was 
wounded at the battle of Shiloh and incapaci- 
tated for further service. From 1879 to 1883 
he was clerk of the Circuit Court of this judi- 
cial district, and was admitted to the bar dur- 
ing the latter year. He was elected State Sena- 
tor in 1866 and served two terms. Mr. Howard, 
in 1892, was elected to the Supreme Court 
Judgeship, and during his term of office he en- 
deared himself to the bar and the community 
at large. During his early life Judge Howard 
was a member of the city council, where among 
other services, he secured for the city the beau- 
tiful river park which bears his name. He also 
served as City Attorney and as County Attor- 
ney, and in every position evinced marked abil- 
ity and energy. He has been identified with 
some of the most important causes ever before 
the courts, and demonstrated his legal ability 
in the Barrett Law case, the City Hall case and 
others of equal prominence. Judge Howard is 
a thorough classical scholar of a high order, 
and his lectures on law, literature and history 



DR. D. E. CUMMINS. 

Dr. David E. Cummins, one of the leading 
dentists of South Bend, is a public spirited and 
progressive citizen of the highest type. He is 
a native of Pennsylvania, and was born at 
Elderton, Armstrong County, Pa., September 5, 
1847. His father, William S. Cummins, was a 
prominent contractor of that section of the 
state. After receiving a comprehensive edu- 
cation in the schools and academies of his na- 
tive state, Mr. Cummins, at the early age of 
nineteen years, left the parental roof, and 
sought to make his own way in life. In 1867 
he came to Elkhart, Ind., and for several years 
was associated with his brother, S. M. Cummins, 
with whom he acquired an expert knowledge of 
dentistry. He came to South Bend in Novem- 
ber, 1870, and established himself in business 
in the old Colfax building. From the outset he 
was remarkably successful and numbered among 




DR. I). E. CUMMINS. 



his clients the best families of the city. In 
June. 1887, he erected the handsome brick build- 
ing at the northeast corner of Main street and 
Colfax avenue, to which he removed, and where 



SOUTH BEND. 



125 



his handsomely appointed offices are now lo- 
cated. Dr. Cummins occupies a prominent po- 
sition in the community and is connected with 
many of the leading enterprises here. He is 
the president of the South Bend Savings and 
Loan Association, the River View Cemetery 
Company and the Commercial Athletic Club. 
He is a gentleman of refinement and culture, 
and is affiliated with the Masons, the Royal 
Arcanum and other orders of a kindred nature. 
Mr. Cummins was married in 1871 to Miss Etta 
Lowry, and with his daughters, Maud and 
Grace, resides in a handsome home at No. 337 
West Colfax avenue. 



HON. GEORGE FORD. 

Hon. George Ford the lawyer, is a native of. 
South Bend. He was born January 11, 1846 
and received his early education in the schools 
of his native city. He attended the law school 







HON. GEORGE FOBD. 

of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, 
where he graduated in the class of 1869. He 
was admitted to the bar and for several years 
was associated with Col. Norman Eddy and 
Mr. Joseph Henderson, in whose offices he pur- 
sued a general practice. In 1874 he was select- 
ed as the prosecuting attorney of the circuit, 
and this office he held until 18S5. The people 
of the Thiiteenth Congressional District elected 
him to the National House of Representatives 
at the general election of 1884, and he was a 
member of the 49th Congress. Mr. Ford'c 



clientele embraces many of the leading busi- 
ness men and corporations of this city, and he 
is interested in a number of prominent local 
institutions and enterprises. Mr. Ford is 
married, his wife being the daughter of Mr. 
James Oliver, of South Bend. His home is lo- 
cated at No. 630 West Washington street. 



HON. WILLIAM H. LONGLEY. 

Hon. William H. Longley, ex-Mayor of South 
Bend, and a member of the firm of Leeper & 
Longley, manufacturers of brick, is a native 
of the xioosier State, and was born in Elkhart 
County, Indiana, October 3, 1846. Mr. Longley 
comes of sturdy Pennsylvania stock, his father, 
Andrew Longley, having been born in that 
state, and his mother, Mary Longley, being a 
native of Elkhart County, Indiana. In 1853 
his parents settled on a farm at Sumption 
Prairie, St. Josepn County. Young Longley 
was the eldest ot a family of three children, 
and was brought up on the farm, where he 
inherited that sturdy independence of the farm 
boy of forty years ago. He attended the dis- 
trict school, where he received the usual com- 
mon school education, which he supplemented 
by reading good books, and also by a course 
at Notre Dame, where he graduated in 1867 
from the commercial department. When he 
had reached his majority he left the farm and 
came to South Bend and entered the dry 
goods store of John Brownfield, where he re- 
mained until 1888, when he was elected Mayor 
of South Bend, and in 1890 was reelected and 
served nis second term. During his regime 
as chief executive of the city many notable 
improvements were made, and the progress 
was vice president until 1888. He was also 
ment. Mr. Longley also served the city, in 
1882, as councilman from the Second ward. 
He is a man distinctively of the people, affable 
and approachable at all times, and in his 
public and private life has been a man of strict 
honor. He was one of the incorporators of 
the A. C. Sualey Manufacturing Company, and 
was vice president until 1888. He was also 
one of the incorporators of the Indiana Hedge 
Fence Company. He is a man of sound judg- 
ment and a thoroughly public spirited citizen, 
who has the best welfare of tne city at heart. 
In 1892 he became a memoer of the firm of 
Leeper & Longley. manufacturers of brick, in 
which business he is now engaged. Mr. Long- 
ley is prominent in social and fraternal circles, 
bing a Mason, and Knight of Pythias; also a 
charter member of Crusade Lodge, No. 14. and 
Uniform Rank. He was married in 1872 to 
Miss Helen Searle, and resides at No. 215 
t,outh William street. 



126 



SOUTH BEND. 



HORACE G. MILLER. 
Mr. H. G. Miller, who was named after the 
famous journalist and statesman Horace 
Greeley, is a native of St. Joseph County and 
was horn November 14, 1S49. His father, Wil- 
liam Miller, was one of the pioneer farmers in 
this vicinity and came to Indiana in 1833 and 
settled in St. Joseph County when the Potta- 
watomie Indians roamed these western forests 
and prairies. The elder Mr. Miller represented 
his district in the state legislature from 1841 
to 1850 and was a prominent figure in the poli- 
tics of his time, being an old line Whig and 
one of the organizers of the republican party 
In this state. The young man was educated 
in the district schools, and afterward was 
sent to Northern Indiana College and at- 
tended Monmovth Co'lege at Monmouth. 




Electrical Mfg. Company, and is vice presi- 
dent of the company. He was appointed Post- 
master of South Bend by President McKinley 
in 1898 and since his incumbency of that im- 
portant office he has instituted many bene- 
ficial extensions and improvements in the local 
postal service, all of which are highly appre- 
ciated by the business community and citizens 
of South Bend. Mr. Miller comes of a family 
which for years has taken a deep interest in 
public affairs. His oldest brother, John P. Mil- 
ler, who was a member of the State Senate 
when the war of the rebellion broke out, at 
once raised the 29th Regiment Indiana Volun- 
teers and was appointed as its Colonel, and 
was afterward, for heioic conduct promoted to 
a Brigadier Generalship. After the war was 
over he went to California and was appointed 
Collector of Customs at San Francisco. He was 
afterward chosen United States Senator from 
California, and became chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Foreign Relations of that body. 
While serving in the Senate he died in the 
full flush of honorable distinction in 1SS6. 
Another brother of Postmaster Miller, Isaac 
Newton Miller was elected County Commissi- 
oner at the last election. Mr. Miller in addi- 
tion to his duties as Postmaster is also in- 
terested in the improvements of the lands in 
the Kankakee Valley which have been redeemed 
and are now fertile fields. He with his brother 
I. N. Miller, has a farm of 800 acres in this 
district. Mr. Miller is a popular citizen, an 
able official and an influential member of ths 
community. He has hosts of admiring friends 
and is a leader in the ranks of his party. 



II. <;. MILLER. 

Illinois, where he graduated in 1870 with the 
honorable degree of Bachelor of Science. After 
leaving Monmouth, he came to South Bend 
and for a time was connected with J. G. Bart- 
lett, one of the pioneer merchants of this city, 
in the grocery business. On the retirement of 
Mr. Bartlett, Mr. Miller associated himself wifh 
Myron Campbell, now the cashier of the South 
Bend National Bank, under the firm name o! 
Miller & Campbell. Leaving the commercial 
business he was engaged by the Studebaker 
Wagon Co., as a traveling salesman and after- 
ward filled an important office in that company. 
In 1892 he became interested in the Miller- 
Knoblock Co. in the manufacture of wagons 
and is now a member of the MUler-Knoblock 



GEORGE E. CLARKE. 

Mr. George Edmond Clarke is a leading at- 
torney of Indiana. He is a Southener by birth 
and was born in the city of New Orleans, La.. 
May S, 1860. His father, Matthew Clarke, 
was a prominent railroad and steamboat offi- 
cial, and his mother was Ellen Clarke. Both 
his parents were natives of Ireland. Young 
Clarke had all the advantages of an excellent 
education. His early school days were passed 
in the South, after which he attended the public 
school at Cario, 111., where he graduated. He 
was also a student at St. Vincent's College, 
Cape Girardeau, Mo., at Cornell University. 
New York, and at the University of Michigan. 
at Ann Arbor. At the University of Notre 
Dame he received the degrees of L. L. B., and 
B. A., and in 1880 was awarded the degree of 
Master of Arts. Mr. Clark was for some years 
connected with this institution as a Professor 
of Mathematics, History and Oratory, and later 
taught in the Law school of this university. 



SOUTH BEND 



12? 



During his different school vacations, he per- 
formed various clerical duties. He was private 
secretary to the president of the Mobile & Ohio 
Railroad, and for a time he did newspaper 
work. After his graduation he was engaged 
with the Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing Com- 
pany. Believing that the practice of law would 
afford a better field for the development of hi? 
abilities, Mr. Clarke entered the post-graduare 
law course of the University 01 Michigan, at 
Ann Arbor where he received the degree of 
Master of Laws. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1883. It was not until 1890, however, that 
he was identified with the bar of St. Joseph 
County. His civil practice is large, and he is 
one of the few lawyers who thoroughly under- 




GEORGB E. CLARKE. 

stands bookkeeping and accounts. He has ap- 
peared as attorney in many murder cases, in 
all of which he has added fresh and enduring 
laurels to his fame as a lawyer. As a public 
speaker his addresses are in the highest sense 
classical, eloquent and powerful, and upon all 
great occasions he is chosen as the orator of the 
day. His speeches on Decoration Day; on the 
Columbus Day celebration; at the dedication 
of the Auditorium; the Alumni oration at Notre 
Dame, and at the Bradley Memorial exercises 
are models of oratorical beauty and classical 
diction. His address before the Indiana Bar 
Association, at Indianapolis, was most favor- 
ably commented upon by the eastern papers, 
and gained for him increased honor and 
popularity, and classed him among the recog- 



nized orators of the west. At a recent meet- 
ing of Indiana lawyers at Indianapolis, he was 
selected as one of the three delegates, from 
this state, to the meeting of the American Bar 
Association at Saratoga, N. Y. The other 
two delegates were Judge Robeit S. Taylor, of 
Fort Wayne, and Hon. Samuel O. Pickens, of 
Indianapolis. At Saratoga the Indiana dele- 
gates elected him a member of the Council fur 
their state. In 1900 Mr. Clarke was nominated 
by the Republicans for Prosecuting Attorney 
of St. Joseph County, and in November he was 
elected, and is now filling that responsible po- 
sition with credit and honor Mr. Clarke has 
delivered a number of lectures on historical 
subjects ,and has appeared before audiences in 
many of the principal cities of the east and 
west Mr. Clarke was married in 18S7, to one 
of South Bend's most cultured musicians. Miss 
Mamie Giddings, but after a brief married life 
she died, leaving him with two children. In 
1S95 he was again married and his present wi'e 
was Miss Mary Vanderhoof, a most estimable 
lady of South Bend society. His home is lo- 
cated in Chapin Park. 



^GEORGE W. LOUGHMAN. 

Mr. George W. Loughman, ex-mayor of South 
Bend, and President and General Manager of 
the Sandage Steel Skein Company, a conspicu- 
ous manufacturing enterprise of this city, is a 
native of the Buckeye State, and was born at 
Brownsville. Ohio, December 25, 1846. Mr. 
Loughman comes of sturdy Pensylvania stock, 
his father being David Loughman and his 
mother Elizabeth (Martin) Loughman. Mr. 
Loughman was the youngest of the family of 
five children and was reared and passed his 
boyhood days on a farm. He received a fair 
education in the district schools, and when 
seventeen years of age he went to the front 
in the service of his country- He enlisted in 
Company G., 32nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
served with valor for two years, participating 
in many notable engagements of the Atlanta 
campaign. He accompanied General Sherman 
in his famous march to the sea, and served in 
the campaigns in the Carolinas and Old Domin- 
ion. At the close of the great internecino 
struggle he was mustered out at Louisville, 
Ky., and returned at once to his home in Ohio, 
where he remained three months, when he 
came to St. Joseph County and located at 
Mishawaka, where he found employment as 
a cleik for the Lake Shore and Michigan 
Southern Railroad. He was later appointed 
agent of the company, which position he held 
for three years, when he came to South 
Bend as cashier of the company, where he 



128 



SOUTH BEND, 



remained six years. In 1SS0 he went to 
Chicago as the company's repiesentative at 
the Union Stock Yards, and six months later 
he returned to this city as agent of the road 




GEORGE W. LOTJGETMAN. 



this sketch received his practical business train- 
ing. His mother was Hattie (Butler) Shively. 
In the public schools of this city young Shively 
received his preliminary education, and in 1889 
he graduated at the South Bend High school. 
Mr Shively decided to take up a professional 
life, and in 1S91 entered the University of Michi 
gan at Ann Arbor where he received the degree 
of L. L. B., upon his graduation in 1892. He 
returned to South Bend and entered the law 
department of Notre Dame .and received his 
degree of Master of Laws. He was admitted to 
the bar and in 1892 began the practice of gen- 
eral law and has built up a large and per- 
manent practice. In his profession Mr. Shively 
is a careful counselor and an able attorney. In 
business life he has won for himself a name 
as a practical business man of rare ability. In 
1899 Mr. Shively saw an opportunity in the oil 
business, and with a small capital he opened up 
the famous field in Jasper County that he sold 
to the Byrd Syndicate of London, England 
The field is a prolific one and the only one east 
of the Mississippi river producing an oil. which, 
under a process owned by the Byrd Syndicate. 
can be used in the manufacture of an imitation 
of Para rubber, and for the manufacture of 
rubber paint. Mr. Shively was secretary of the 
Inter State Oil Company which he sold, and he 
is now secretary of the Inter State Petroleum 



where he remained nine years, in 1890 Mr. 
Loughman resigned his position and became 
secretary of the Sandage Steel Skein Company 
and was made President and General Manage" 
later. He has ever been prominent in Repub- 
lican politics and in 1884 was elected Mayor of 
South Bend, and was honored by a reelection 
in 1886. He has also served the city two terms 
as Councilman and was also elected County 
Auditor. Mr. Loughman is president of the 
South Bend Building and Loan Association. He 
is prominent in the social and fraternial life 
of our city ana is a member of leading lodges 
and clubs. In 1868 he married Miss Martha 
Chandler, of Mishawaka, and has one daughter. 
Mrs. 0. R. Miller, of South Bend. He resides in 
a pretty home at No. 716 South Michigan 
street 



DUDLEY M. SHIVELY. 

Mr. Dudley M. Shively, one of St. Joseph 
County's able attorneys and a leading business 
man, is a native of South Bend, having been 
born here January 18, 1871. Mr. Shively comes 
of a family highly prominent in this section, 
his father, Daniel M Shively, having been for 
many years engaged in the dry goods trade 
here, and it was in his store that the subject of 




DUDLEY M. SUIVELV. 

Oil & Gas Company, and the Bailey Oil Com- 
pany, both operating extensively in the Jasper 
County field. Mr. Shively is a very large hold- 
er of valuable oil property in Adams and Jay 



SOUTH BEND 



120 



Counties. These properties are being rapidly 
developed under his energetic business methods 
and promise to be among the most valuable 
and large producing wells in the country. Mr. 
Shively was married June 24, 1896, to Miss 
JaneUe M. Johnson, of Niles, Michigan, and 
resides in a handsome home at the corner of 
South Franklin and Elmira streets. He i? 
popular in social life, and is a member of the 
Masons, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of th* 
World, Modern Woodmen ana the Maccabees, 
and of Murat Temple. Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Indianapol's. 



HON. WALTER A. FUNK. 

Among the prominent attorneys of South 
Bend, Hon. Walter A. Funk, Circuit Judge of 
St. Joseph County, has by his superior talents 
and untiring energy earned a conspicuous place. 
Judge Funk had none of those advantages 
which served to advarce the sons of wealthy 
parents, but by his own efforts and abilities 
has won for himself his present position on the 
bench of St. Joseph County, and his social stand- 
ing in the community. His father was a farm- 
er in Elkhart County, and Judge Funk was born 




TION. WALTER A. FINK. 

there December 18, 1857, his father being Wil- 
liam Funk, who is now living at Elkhart, but 
who at that time had a farm and saw mill. Judge 
Funk was a student in the schools of Goshen 
and Valparaiso, and in 1885 graduated from 



the Law department of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor. For two years previous he 
was a student in the law office of Judge Smith 
in Cassopolis, Mich., and of Hon. Andrew An- 
derson in South Bend, and in 1886 he located in 
South Bend where he has since been engaged 
in most successful practice. He was the attorney 
for a number of the leading corporations and 
business men in South Bend and his standing 
at the bar is of the highest. He was the Re- 
publican candidate for State Senator in 1892. 
and although he ran far ahead of his ticket, he 
failed of election in that eventful political year. 
In November, 1900, he was elected Circuit Judge 
of St. Joseph County, on the Republican 
ticket, and his election has given to all litigants 
and counsel a wise and fair administration of 
justice, and an able adjudication of all cases 
that come before him. Judge Funk is essen- 
tially a self-made man. He worked for his 
father until he was twenty-one years old, except 
at certain intervals when he taught school. As 
an evidence of his ability it may be stated 
that he was selected as a teacher at the early 
age of sixteen years and acquitted himself in 
that profession most creditably. Judge Funk 
was married to Miss Mary E. Harris and has 
one son, William Harris Funk. His office is 
in the Oliver Opera House block and the hand- 
some family residence is at No. 733 West Wash- 
ington street. 



WILLIS A. BUGBEE. 
Upon the proper preparation of abstracts 
depends the absolute security of the purchase 
of a tract of real estate, and there is no more 
important and responsible profession than the 
careful and correct maker of abstracts of title 
in a growing and enterprising city. Since 
1867 Mr. Willis A. Bugbee has been connected 
with this important profession, and his name 
is an accepted guarantee in all questions where 
the titles to real estate are involved or con- 
cerned. Mr. Willis A. Bugbee is a native of 
South Bend, and was born September 17, 1845. 
His father, Almond Bugbee, who is still living 
at the honored age of eighty-five years came to 
this section of the country in 1837 and for years 
was engaged in the shoe and tannery business 
and afterward in the manufacture of house- 
hold furniture. Yotmg Bugbee spent his early 
yeais in the public schools of South Bend and 
Chicago, and in 1867 he graduated from the 
L,aw Department of the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor. He was admitted to the bar 
and at once entered the law and abstract 
office of Andrew Anderson, with whom he was 
associated until 1870. when Mr. Anderson re- 
tired and Mr. Bugbee purchased the business 



130 



SOUTH BEND. 



and records and established in business on his 
own account. The office of Mr. Bugbee which 
is located in the new Bank building at Nos. 
1 i'l'-I 24 North Main street, contains a perfect 




WILLIS A. BUGBEE. 

up-to-date set of records of the title to every 
foot of ground in St. Joseph County. Mr. Bug- 
bee is one of the most conscientious and pains- 
taking of men, and his certificate of title is ac- 
cepted unqualifiedly by every attorney and real 
estate purchaser in the county. The value of 
real estate transactions upon which Mr. Bugbei 
has been employed to attend to has involved 
many millions of dollars, and that he has met 
with no losses to his clients is a convincing 
evidence of the careful and painstaking meth- 
ods of business he has always followed. Mr. 
Bugbee was married to Miss Evelyn E. Badet, of 
New London, Conn., and his family consists 
of two estimable daughters. His handsome 
residence is located at No. 311 South Main 
street and is a home of refinement and ho=- 
pitality. Mr. Bugbee is a prominent citizen of 
South Bend. He is the secretary of the South 
Bend Building and Loan Association, and the 
Attorney for the St. Joseph Loan and Savings 
Association. 



JONATHAN P. CREED. 

One of the prominent and able members of 
the bar here is Mr. Jonathan P. Creed. He is 
a native of New York, having been born in the 
town of Benton, Yates County, December 2, 
1844. His father was William H. Creed, a 



prominent builder and contractor. Despite his 
fifty-six years Mr. Creed is still vigorous and an 
energetic and active practitioner of acknowl- 
edged reliability. He received his early educa- 
tion in the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at 
Lima. N. Y., and when but seventeen years 
of age, in 1861. he promptly responded to his 
country's call and enlisted in the 126th New 
York Volunteers. His regiment was attached 
to the Army of the Potomac, and was a part of 
the Second Army Corps, which was commended 
by General W. S. Hancock. His regiment was 
classed as one of the famous "300 fighting regi- 
ments." and participated in all of the great bat- 
tles in which the Army of the Potomac was en- 
gaged. The young volunteer was shot through 
the right arm and side on July 4, 1863, at the 
battle of Gettysburg. In March. 1868. Mr. Creed 
came to South Bend and studied law in the of- 
fice of J. B. Arnold, after which he engaged in 
partnership with his preceptor. This continued 
until 1881. when Mr. Creed engaged in business 
on his own account his office being in 
the handsome new Dean building. He 
was married to Miss Lucretia Miller, daughter 
of Solomon M Her, of South Bend. He has four 
estimable daughters, one of whom is Miss 
Alice Miller Creed, who has studied law, been 
admitted to practice in the Supreme Court, and 




.liiHXATHAX P. CREED. 

is now an able assistant to her honored father. 
Mr. Creed is a member of Auten Post, No. 8, 
G. A. R., and was for three years Commander of 
the post. Mr. Creed is highly esteemed and re- 
sides at No. 429 South Main street. 



SOUTH BEND. 



131 



ALICE M. CREED. 

Miss Alice Miller Creed, who holds an envi- 
able place in the professional life of our city, 
was born in South Bend, and is a daughter of 
Jonathan P. Creed, the well-known attorney 
at law, and Lucret'a (Miller) Creed, whose 
father, Solomon Miller, was former treasurer 
of St. Joseph County. Miss Creed received 
ber education in the schools of this city and 
graduated from the High School in the class 
of 1892. She then decided to follow the pro- 
fession of her father, and attended the law 
depaitment of the University of lndianapol's, 
where she graduated in the class of 1897, and 
was admitted to practice before the Supreme 




/*r 



MISS ALICE M. CREED. 

Court of the State of Indiana. Miss Creed has 
since been associated with her father in law 
practice in this city. She is a young lady of 
rare mental gifts, and is a favorite with all 
who know her. 



JOSEPH B. ARNOLD. 

The erection of the handsome and imposing 
Arnold Building by Mr. Joseph B. Arnold at 
Nos. 216-218 West Jefferson street, marks an 
important epoch in the erection of buildings 
designed especially for office purposes in this 
city, and is a striking illustration of Mr. Ar- 
nold's public spirit. He is one of the oldest 
and most prominent attorneys now practic- 
ing at the local bar. A native of New York, 
Mr. Arnold was born at Medina, Orleans 
County, and his father was the owner of a 



number of boats that plied the Erie canal. 
He spent his early years in the east, and when 
fifteen years of age he came to South Bend. 
Here he attended the public schools and theu 
took a full course in the Chicago Law Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated in 1865. He was 
admitted to the bar and commenced the prac- 
tice of law, and for a time Mr. Jonathan P. 
Creed was asociated with him in business. 
In 1870 he was appointed Deputy Prosecuting 
Attorney for St. Joseph County. In 1875 he was 
instrumental in the organization of the Peo- 
ple's Savings Bank, and was its president until 
1885, when he voluntarily closed it out, wound 
up its affairs, surrendered its charter and de- 
voted himself to private business. Since that 
time Mr. Arnold has confined his practice to 
real estate matters, abstracts and foreclosures, 
and he is a recognized authority on real estate 
titles in this locality. He has a perfect set of 
abstracts and has no superior as a real estate 
lawyer. Mr. Arnold is retiring and modest in 
his manner, but is the most courteous and 
genial of men. The new Arnold building is a 
model of architecture and is one of the hand- 
somest and most tastefully appointed buildings 
in the west, and is a beautiful and substantial 
addition to the city. 



BENJAMIN F. PRICE. 

For more than half a century the name of 
Benjamin F. Price has been associated with the 
profession of undertaking in South Bend. Ben- 
jamin F. Price, the elder, came to this city from 
Uniontown, Pa., in 1S35, and from that time until 
nis death, which occurred October 16, 1887, ha 
was identified with the furniture and undertak- 
ing business in this vicinity. Mr. Benjamin 
F. Price, the son, who at present conducts the 
business was born in South Bend, December 
12, 1850. He was educated in the public schools 
of this city, and at the University of Notre 
Dame, and from his early boyhood he assisted 
his father in the primitive establishment which 
he then conducted. Mr. Price is a practical 
undertaker of progressive ideas, and his office 
sales and warerooms are equipped with every 
modern appliance and are handsomely fur- 
nished. The hearses owned by him are of 
the finest description, and every detail of 
the business is conducted upon the highest 
principles of business courtesy and thorough- 
ness. During his career he has conducted the 
funerals of many of the most prominent citi- 
zens of South Bend, and he is regarded by the 
community at large as a courteous and able 
undertaker. Mr. Price is also associated with 
Mr. Frank E. Bowman in the management of 



132 



SOUTH BEND. 



an extensive livery and boarding stable at the 
corner of St. Joseph and Jefferson streets. H3 
was also connected with his brother. John B. 
Price, in the business, but since his death, in 




George Reynolds, and then again took up his 
residence in South Bend. In 1859 with a party 
of friends he journeyed to Pike s Peak in search 
for gold, but returned in the fall of the same 
year. He again turned his atention to farming 
and located at Roiling Prairie, Laporte County, 
and was County Trustee for fourteen years, 
and a member of the asylum board for twenty- 
five years. In 18S3 he came back to South 
Bend and was engaged at the home repository 
01 the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Company for fif- 
teen years. In 1898 he was selected as the Re- 
publican candidate for County Treasurer and 
was elected. His management of the office has 
been of so high a character that he was re- 
nominated, in 1900, without opposition and 
reelected his own successor. Mr. Zigler is a 
gentleman of great business capacity, and has 
won the esteem of all. He is prominent in 
social circles and in fraternial life, and is a 
member of Masonic Lodge. No. 291, of Rolling 



BENJAMIN F. PKICE. 

1882, has managed the business alone, with 
an able corps of assistants. Mr. Price was 
married to Miss Maggie Fagan, of St. Joseph 
Mich., and resides at No. 126 North Michigan 
street. 



JOHN W. /.KiLER. 
Mr. John \V. Zigler, the County Treasurer of 
St. Joseph County, is one of the old Trojans 
in South Bend, and one ot its most honored 
citizens. Mr. Zigler is a Virginian rjy birth, 
his native city being Salem, in Bortetort 
County of that state. His father, Michael Zig- 
ler, was a tanner and well known in that local- 
ity. In ISol his family moved to South Bend 
and located on a farm now owned by Reuben 
Donomeyer. He assisted his father on the 
farm and attended the district schools until the 
death of the former in 1848. He afterward 
worked on a farm and in the brick business 
until he was twenty-one years old, when he 
came to this city and engaged as a clerk in 
the store of Ethan, John and George Reynolds. 
After that he was engaged in John Brown- 
field's store and then engaged in farming at 
Terre Coupee Prairie, in St. Joseph County. He 
was married in 1857 to Miss Mary Ann Rey- 
nolds, the widow of his former employer, 




JOHN W. ZIOLER. 

Prairie, and a member of the State Grange 
since its organization, and he served one year 
as state lecturer of the Giange. 



LESTER F. BAKER. 

Mr. Lester F. Baker, who has been promi- 
nently identified with the real estate business 
in South Bend, is a native of the Empire State. 
He was born in Oneida County, August 19, 
1819, and his early manhood was spent in that 



SOUTH BEND 



133 



locality. His father, Eleazer Baker, was a suc- 
cessful commission merchant, and one of the 
early pioneers in that section of the state. Mr. 
Baker received his early education in the dis 






in this locality. His home is at No. 334 Soutn 
Main street, and he has resided there for forty- 
one years continuously. 



EDMUND C. WESTERVELT. 

Mr. Edmund Corlett Westervelt is one of ths 
prominent business men of South Bend and 
is largely interested in a number of important 
manufacturing enterprises in this city and else 
wheie. He was born at Mansfield, Ohio, July 
28, 1847, and is a son of Rev. W. A. Westervelt, 
a Congregational clergyman, now deceased, and 
Lyda (Drake) Westervelt. He received his 
education in the schools where his father was 
ministerially engaged. He next studied at 
Washington College, at Washington, Iowa, en- 
tering the freshman class, and then took a par- 
tial course at Oberlin College, and a business 
course at the same institution. He was en- 
gaged in the grocery business at Oberlin for six 
years. He temporarily retired from business 
and traveled extensively through Europe and 
the Continent. He returned to Oberlin and on 
July 3, 1877, was married to Miss Florence E. 
Bacon, of Edwardsburg, Mich., who was attend- 
ing the Oberlin Conseivatory of Music. Mr. 
Westervelt was first attracted by the cultured 



LESTEK F. UAKEK. 



trict schools in the vicinity of his home, and 
afterward worked on a farm for four years. 
When twenty years old he taifght school and 
followed this occupation for six years, and m 
1846 he removed to Akron, Ohio, where he en- 
gaged in the hardware business. After a shore 
time spent in Sandusky, he was engaged in the 
construction of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & 
Dayton railway, and in 1852 he came to South 
Bend, when the population of the city was 
but 800. in search of a business location. Dur- 
ing that year he and his brother, Darwin H. 
Baker, opened a boot and shoe store in this 
city, and continued in this business until 1861, 
when he retired to engage in the real estate 
business which he has since very successfully 
followed. He is a large property owner and 
one of the most respected citizens in this com- 
munity. He was married in 1849 to Miss Mary 
R. Willey, of Delaware, Oho, and his family 
consists of two daughters. Mr. Baker has been 
a member of the City Council where he served 
with great credit, and in 1889 was appointed 
a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Northern Indiana Insane Asylum located at 
Logansport. Mr. Baker is a public spirited citi- 
zen and is endeared to a large circle of friends 




EDMUND C. WESTERVELT. 

voice of bis future bride which led to an intro- 
duction and resulted in marriage. On their 
wedding journey they passed through Soutn 
Bend, and Mr. Westervelt was attracted by its 



134 



SOUTH BEND 



business energy. Leaving his wife at Laporte 
with friends he returned here and leased a 
store and established himself in the grocery 
business. While still engaged at this he pur- 
chased stock in the South Bend Chilled Plow- 
Company and afterward engaged in the paper 
pulp business. He erected a pulp mill at Mish- 
awaka. which he rented, retaining an interest in 
the business. While thus engaged he disposed 
of his grocery and started in the manufactuie 
of paper, and in 1880 established the South 
Bend Paper Company of which he is the sole 
proprietor. After continuing in partnership 
with Gaylor and Clarke in the pulp business 
he purchased their interests and conducted it 
alone. In 1887 he sold his pulp mill and store 
building for a half interest in the Bissell Chilled 
Plow Works, and in 1890 his father purchased 
one half of the remaining interest and he be- 
came the representative of three-fourths of the 
stock, and assumed the duties of president, 
treasurer and general manager, and still holds 
these offices. In 1892 he founded the Prairie 
State Paper Company at Taylorville, 111., and is 
its president. In 1894 he established the Atlas 
Paper Bag Company, of this city, and is the 
president of that company, and is also th.: 
treasurer of the Chicago Indurated Fibre Co. 
Mr. Westervelt is largely interested in thai 
beautiful lakeside summer resort known as 
Ottawa Beach and Macatawa Park on the west- 
ern shore of Lake Michigan, which is one of 
the most delightful resorts in the lake region of 
Michigan. Tne hotels Ottawa and Macatawa 
are models and in the season filled with guests 
from all sections. Mr. Westervelt is president 
of the Macatawa Park Association. He is a 
progressive business man of the highest type, 
and a public spiiited citizen. He resides w.th 
his wife and family, consisting of two daugh- 
ters, Winifred and Nellie, at No. 115 Franklin 
place. 



MARTIN L. AVENGER, 

There are few living in South Bend to-day 
who were here in 1841, when Mr. Martin Light 
Wenger, then a sturdy boy, arrived in St. Jo- 
seph County and began the struggle of life. 
topeaking only German, the language of his 
Pennsylvania home, and with but little else 
than a robust constitution, an honest heart 
and an ambition to succeed, Mr. Wenger has 
won the success of which he d: earned more 
than sixty years ago, and won it by his own 
efforts. Mr. Martin L. Wenger was born at 
Jonestown, Lebanon County, Pa., June 16, 1820. 
and was the next youngest of a family of eight 
children born to Martin Wenger and Elizabeth 
(Light) Wenger. The Wenger family history 



dates back to the 17th century, and in 1737 Hans 
Wenger, the progenitor of this branch, a native 
of Rhinish Bavaria, sailed from Rotterdam on 
the ship "Charming Nancy" of London, fop 
America. In 1749 he located in Pennsylvania, 
where he purchased 125 acres of land, the sanii'. 
being occupied by John L. wenger, of the sixth 
generation of the family. Christian Wenger, a 
son of Hans, was a minister of the River Breth- 
ern denomination, and grandfather of the pres- 
ent subject of this sketch. His family consisted 
of eight children, Martin, the second being 
father of the present Martin Light Wenger. He 
was married in 1801 to Miss Elizabeth Light. 
who died in 1S23, when Martin L. Wenger was 
but a child, and he then married Magdelena 
(Light) Holdeman. a widow and a sister of his 



^S #fc\ 




MARTIN I,. WKNGEIi. 

first wife. She had six children, and with their 
issue of six more the family circle numbered 
exactly twenty. At the age of fifteen young 
Wenger began life as a teamster, and had few 
opportunities of obtaining an education. He 
lived with his parents on the farm until he 
reached his majority, and on October 13, 1841, 
left home for the West. With his scanty- 
wardrobe packed in a hemp grain sack, and 
$200.00 in a belt, in company of his cousin, 
Levi Wenger, he began the walk from Penn- 
sylvania, and made his first stop with a sister 
at Springfield, Ohio. He then visited another 
sister at Dayton, O., and then trudged on to the 
home of a brother, Joseph W T enger, at Green- 
ville, Ohio. Here he met his elder brother, 



SOUTH^BEND. 



135 



Christian, who four years previously had locat- 
ed at South Bend, and came on to this city, ar- 
riving November 9, 1841. His first job was cut- 
ting wood for Abram Stover at 62% cents per 
cord, and out of that he paid $1.50 per week 
for board. In the spring of 1842 he bought a 
horse for seventy dollars and a wagon for ten, 
and with Samuel Suavely went to Illinois, and 
on to Iowa City, Iowa. Finding wages lower 
there than here he returned and a week later 
his horse died. He had used up his money and 
started threshing at 113.00 per month, and 
soon owned a threshing machine. In 1842 he 
went horseback to Ohio to attend an English 
school, and returned in the spring, and the next 
fall began threshing again. That winter he re- 
turned to Pennsylvania on horseback, and the 
following spring returned to South Bend. In 
the summer of 1844 he bought eighty acres of 
land on Turkey Creek, and built a house, 16x1-!. 
February IS, 1845, he was married to Miss 
Christina Studebaker, and in March moved to 
his new home. In June, 1854, Mrs. Wenger be- 
came a member of the German Baptist church. 
Two years later Mr. Wenger was baptized, 
and the following year was chosen a deacon in 
the church. In 1877 the Wenger church was 
erected on a corner of Mr. Wenger's farm, 
bhortly after his marriage his wife's mothe. 
died, and the Studebaker homestead, of 155 
acres was sold at auction and purchased by Mr. 
Wenger and his brother. This farm is tha 
site of the present home of Mr. Wenger and 
within the corporate limits, Mr. Wenger having 
sold all but 85 acres. In the spring of 1848 he 
removed to his tarm, where he has since resided. 
Three times tne buildings on his farm have 
been rebuilt and enlarged. In 1872 Mr. and 
Mrs. Wenger retired from the cares of active 
life. On February 18, 1895, they celebrated the 
anniversary of their golden wedding. In 1875 
they made a trip to the Pacific coast, visiting 
all points of interest, and at Salt Lake City 
visited the great Mormon Tabernacle and had 
an interview with Brigham ¥oung, a piiv.lege 
rarely granted visitors. During his long and ac- 
tive life Mr. Wenger has always been a christ- 
ian and public spirited gentleman of the high- 
est standing. He has always been a staunch 
Republican, and cast his first vote for William 
Henry Harrison for president. Mr. Wenger had 
four children to brighten his home. Ephiaim 
Wenger, born November 26, 1845; died Decem- 
ber 1, 18*o ; Marietta Wenger, born October 1, 
1847, the wife of Hiram W. Kreighbaum, of the 
Wells & Kieighbaum Mfg. Co.; Christian M. 
Wenger. oorn May 24, 1849, a retired farmer 
and honored resident of oua city, and Ivo Mar- 
tin Wenger, born May 28, 1869; died February 



18, 1871. Mrs. Wenger was a lady of the most 
lovable character and or great benevolence. 
She died September 22, 1S9S, mourned by all 
who knew her. Mr. Wenger is not in robust 
health, but enjoys the love and esteem of his 
children and grandchildren and friends, as 
well as the entire community. 



AUGUSTUS H. INWOOD. 

Mr. Augustus H. Inwood, one of the pioneers 
and a most respected citizen of South Bend, is 
a native of England, and was born at Holy- 
bourn, Hampshire County, November 17, 1817. 
Mr. Inwood was one of a family of elevea 
children born to George Inwood and Mary 
(Gearl) Inwood. Up to the age of fifteen he 



■ 




if) 



AUGUSTUS H. INWOOD. 

resided in England, and received his educa- 
tion in the schools there. When he was four- 
teen years old his parents died and a year 
later he, with two sisters and two brothers, 
decided to come to America, where his two 
elder brothers had preceeded them a year be- 
fore. In April, 1833, he took passage on a 
sailing vessel, which required five weeks to 
make the voyage across the Atlantic. Arriv- 
ing in New York Mr. Inwood remained there 
a week and then started for Zanesville, Ohio, 
where his brother was located. Arriving there 
he found that one of his brothers had gone to 
Mishawaka. Ind. The party left Zanesville 
and proceeded by canal to Cleveland, Ohio, and 
by boat to Detroit, arriving there on the day 



136 



SOUTH BEND 



that Black Hawk, the great Indian chief, reached 
there from Washington. This was before 
the days of railroads and Mr. Inwood left De- 
troit by stage for White Pigeon, Mich., and 
then took the stage to South Bend. He reached 
this city July 5, 1833. in the late thirties he 
and his brother erected the first brewery ia 
South Bend, which burned about the time it 
was put in operation and was never rebuilt. 
He then learned the carpenters trade at whic.u 
he worked in this city and Mishawaka until 
1845, when he went to Sumption Prairie am! 
bought a large farm which he conducted until 
1864, when his health failing ne moved to Le.i- 
awee County, Michigan, and resided there until 
1869, when he returned to this city. In 1ST;) 
he retired from business and moved to his pre- 
sent home, No. 329 South Lafayette stieet, 
where he is enjoying his declining years. Mr. 
Inwood was married in 1850 to Miss Susan 
Green, of St. Joseph County, who died in 1895 
At 83 years of age Mr. Inwood is possessed 
of rare mental faculties and recalls incidents of 
seventy years ago that are of interest. He is 
widely known, honored and esteemed and is 
the owner of valuable property in this city and 
vicinity. 



facture of sprinkling wagons, which continued 
until 18S9 when the Miller-Knoblock Company 
wag organized and began the manufacture of 
drays, trucks, coal wagons and sprinklers. In 
July, 1900, the company was reorganized and re 
incorporated as the Miller-Knoblock Electric 
Manufacturing Company, and embarked upon 
the extensive manufacture of magnet wires, and 
other electrical appliances and repairing all 
classes of motors and dynamos, rewinding 
armatures and refilling commutators and other 
electrical work. Mr. Miller is an energetic 
business man and is highly esteemed in the 
community. He is a brother of the late Hon- 
John F. Miller, who raised the 29th Regiment 
Indiana Volunteers and was its Colonel, and 
for bravery and heroic conduct was made a 






WILLIAM II. MILLER. 

Mr. William H. Miller, treasurer of the Mil- 
ler-Knoblock Electric Manufacturing Company, 
has been prominently identified with the manu- 
facturing interests of South Bend for many 
years. He is a native of St. Joseph County 
and was uorn at Portage Prairie. August 21, 
1838. He is a son of William Miller, who was 
one of the early pioneers in this county, and 
who was a member of the state legislature in 
the early days. Mr. W. H. Miller attended the 
district schools near his home and Prof. Coggs- 
well's Academy in this city, and was a student 
of Wabash College for a year. Then he took 
a course of special studies at Miami University, 
at Oxford, Ohio. He was first engaged in the 
planing mill business and in the manufacture 
of sash, doors and blinds, where the Singer 
Manufacturing Company's plant now stands, 
under the firm name of Marsh & Miller. Later 
Mr. Miller's father purchased the interest of 
Mr. Marsh and the firm became W. H. Miller 
& Co. He continued in this line of business 
for several years when he went to Fond du 
Lac, Wis., and after three years removed to 
St. Louis where he embarked in the coal and 
street sprinkling business. He returned t3 
South Bend in 1880 and engaged in the manu- 




WILLIAM II. MILLER. 

Brigadier General and Major General. He 
afterward removed to California and was 
chosen as United States Senator from that 
state, and died in 1886 while holding that dis- 
tinguished office. Another brother, H. G. Mil- 
ler, is the present efficient Postmaster of South 
Bend, and I. N. Miller, another brother was 
elected County Commissioner of St. Josep;: 
County. He was married to Miss Martha A. 
Crockett, a daughter of the late Harrison M. 
Crockett, a well known citizen of South Bend, 
and his family consists of two daughters, Mrs. 
Carl F. Brown, of Denver, Col., and Miss Ger- 
trude Miller, who lives at home. Mr. Miller 
resides at No. 342 West Colfax avenue. 



SOUTH BEJN D-. 



137 



CALEB A. KIMBALL. 

In sucessful financiering there is no name 
better known or more highly esteemed in 
South Bend than that of Mr. Caleb A. Kimball, 
the honored cashier of the First National Bank 



able financieis of the state, 
in 1856 to Miss Marcia L. 
Bend. 



He was married 
Willis, of Soutn 




DR. GEORGE A. OSBORNE. 

Dr. George Augustus Osborne, a retired 
physician of South Bend and a citizen of high 
repute is a native of Indiana, and was born at 
Madison, February 28, 1823. His father, Isaac 
Osborne, was a native of New Jersey, and 
settled in Ohio where he practiced medicine and 
was also engaged in trade on the Ohio river. 
His mother, Sarah (Pardee) Osborne, came of 
early colonial stock and was a native of Con- 
necticut. The subject of this sketch lived at 
Madison until he was nearly two years old, 
when his parents removed to Waynesville, 
Ohio, about forty miles from Cincinnati, where 
he lived until 1828, and though but five years 
of age still remembers the election of General 
Jackson in that year. His people next moved 
to Clinton County, Ohio, and young Osborne 
received his education in a log school house and 
by private instruction fiorn his parents. He next 
went to Wilmington, Ohio, where he resided 
until 1846. When eighteen years of age, with 
his brother, William Osborne, he bought a saw 
mill at Port William, Ohio, which he conducted 



CALEB A. KIMBALL. 

of South Bend, the leading financial institution 
of St. Joseph County. For thirty-six years Mr. 
Kimball has been connected with this institu- 
tition, and for thirty years has been its cash- 
ier. Mr. Kimball was born in the o'.d Bay 
State, at Ipswich, Mass., February 13, 1829. and 
comes of hardy Yankee stock. His father was 
Philip Kimball and his mother Susan (Stanley) 
Kimball. When a boy, but three years of age, 
his parents removed to Yarmouth, Maine, where 
young Kimball was educated in the public 
schools, and where he also attended the Yar- 
mouth Academy. When he was twenty-one 
years of age — in 1850 — he came to South Bend, 
and for a half century has been in the manufac- 
turing and banking business here. He start- 
ed in the business of manufacturing and cutting 
veneers, and continued this for seven years 
when he went to Illinois and was engaged in 
farming for six years. In 1864 Mr. Kimball 
returned to South Bend and entered the First 
National Bank as a clerk, and was promoted to 
bookkeeper, and then assistant cashier, and in 
1871 was made cashier, which position he has 
since held with honor and credit. Mr. Kimball 
is a stockholder of the bank and one of the 




DR. GEORGE A OSBORNE. 

for a year or two, and in 1849 he removed to 
Wabash, Ind., and bought land and erected a 
log cabin. For this property he paid $275.00, 
and after one year sold the place at a profit 



138 



SOUTH BEND. 



of $1,000.00 and went to Holland. Ind., and 
opened a geneial store, and also bought a gen- 
eral store at Markel, Ind. He remained in the 
mercantile business about two years, sold out, 
and in 1853 bought 640 acres of swamp land 
in Blackford County, Ind., and three years later 
traded 400 acres of it for a fine farm in Ohio. 
Dr. Osborne next went to Mt. Aetna, Hunting- 
ton County, Indiana, where he resided until 
1876. From his boyhood he has always studied 
and practiced medicine, and in 1873 he gradu- 
aed from the Medical Department of the Stat.3 
Univeisity of Indiana, at Indianapolis. In 1885 
Dr. Osborne removed to this city and has since 
resided here. He now owns a large farm near 
South Bend. Dr. Osborne was married in 1S46 
to Margaret A. Fannon, a native of Ohio, and 
Mrs. Osborne is also a practicing physician of 
ability and skill. This happy couple has a 
family of eight children. Hon. C. S. Osborne, 
Commissioner of Railways of the State of 
Michigan, being their son. Dr. and Mrs. Os- 
borne reside at No. 1031 West Washington 
street. 



JOHN E. FISHER. 

Mr. John E. Fisher, one of South Bend's 
oldest and leading attorneys at law, is a native 
of the Hoosier state, having been born in St. 
Joseph County. He is a son of Peter and Lydia 
Fisher, and was born on a farm three miles 
northeast of Notre Dame ,and resided on the 
old homestead until he was sixteen years of 
age, and received his early education in the 
schools of Clay Township. He came to this city 
with his parents in 1864, and atended school at 
the Northern Indiana College for two years 
following, when he began teaching in which 
he was engaged for several years. This voca- 
tion not being to his liking he decided to take 
up the law as a profession, and he entered the 
otnce of Attorneys Eddy & Henderson, a promi- 
nent and leading law firm, here he read law 
three years, and then continued his studies in 
the office of William G. George. In 1869 Mr. 
Fisher was admitted to the bar of St. Joseph 
County, and on the 26th of January. 1870, began 
the practice of his profession, opening his office 
in the Odd Fellows block, where he has since 
remained, a period of thirty years. Mr. Fisher 
has been very successful in his line, confining 
himself to ex-parte proceedings and office prac- 
tice, which he conducts promptly, systematically 
and thoroughly. Being a gentleman of rare 
forensic abilities, he is sympathetic in his na- 
ture, generous in time of distress or need, and 
public spirited to a high degree, ever being in- 
terested in the progress and welfare of the 



city. Possessing an exemplary character, no 
one questions his honesty and integrity, which 
is above criticism or reproach. He is un- 
assuming and unpretentious, yet dignified and 
courteous and occupies a aeservedly high placj 
in his honorable profession, and in the estima- 
tion of the people who know him. Mr. Fisher 
has also, to some extent, been interested in real 




^ 



JOHN E. FISHER. 

estate, buying and selling on his own account, 
and by his fortunate investments has realized 
handsome profits, and accumulated considerable 
valuable property. He was married in 1881 to 
Margaret Thompson, a most estimable and 
lovable lady, who died February 23, 1899 
mourned by all who knew her and of her many 
benefactions. 



AARON JONES. 

Mr. Aaron Jones, one of South Bend's most 
esteemed citizens and successful business men 
is a native of St. Joseph County, and was born 
in German Township, September 9, 183S. He is 
a son of Samuel Jones, a pioneer farmer who 
was a native of the Old Dominion, and Polly 
(Pearson) Jones, a native of North Carolina. 
Young Jones was born and reared on a farm 
and imbibed all of those sturdy characteris- 
tics that have made him a far seeing and 
successful man. His early educat on was ob- 
tained in the country schools, and in 1853 he 
came to this city and attended the South Bend 



SOUTH BEND 



139 



High school. He rounded out his education 
with two years at Antioch College, at Yellow 
Springs, Ohio, and then, for a time, taught 
school. He gave up teaching to engage in 





Agriculture. Mr. Jones was one of the or- 
ganizers and the first President of the Northern 
Indiana and Southern Michigan Agricultural 
Society. He is one of the best known men in 
St. Joseph County, and a public spirited citi- 
zen. He is a Mason and a member of St. Jo- 
seph Lodge. No. 45; a member of South Bend 
Chapter, No. 29, and of South Bena Command- 
ery, No. 13. Mr. Jones was married in 1860 to 
Miss Maggie Wiley, and has two children, 
Aaron Jones, Jr., and Mrs. Mary J. Ort. He re- 
sides at No. 115 South Scott street. 



CALVIN MOON. 



Mr. Calvin Moon, the able and efficient 
Superintenden* of the South Bend Public 
schools, has occupied this important and re- 
sponsible position since 1892, and during his 
incumbency many beneficial improvements 
have been made in the schools of the c ty. Mr. 
Moon is a native of St. Joseph County, and was 
born neai Lakeville, May 16, 1849. He is the 
son of James Moon and Mary (James) Moon, 
and his father was a farmer in that locality. 
The young man was reared on the farm and 
attended the district schools. He afterward 
was a student of the Valparaiso Male and 



AARON JONES. 

agricultural pursuits and settled on a farm in 
Penn Township, four miles from Mishawaka, 
where he lived for twenty years engaged in 
progressive farming. In 1882 Mr. Jones was 
sleeted Auditor of St. Joseph County, and 
moved with his family to this city. He served 
four years, and in 1886 was reelected County 
Auditor, serving until 1891, and giving to that 
ofiice a thorough business administration. Mr. 
Jones has always been a staunch republican in 
politics, and is a gifted and forceful public 
speaker. He was the republican candidate for 
Secretary of State in 1892, and his friends 
have many times insisted upon his accepting 
other honors at the hands of his party, which 
he has always declined. In 1877 Mr. Jones 
with others, organized the Farmer's Mutual In- 
surance Company, whose offices are located in 
this city, and he has always been the secretary 
of the company. The company is a most suc- 
cessful one and carries over $2,500,000.00 in in- 
surance, and has paid in losses over $101,000.00 
Mr. Jones has always been a force in progress- 
ive agriculture and is a member of the Indiana 
State Grange, and State Master of the order. 
He is Master of the National Grange, and 
travels over the United States in its interests 
He is president of the Indiana State Board of 




CALVIN MOON. 

Female College. For two years he was en- 
gaged in teaching school and was then connect- 
ed with the engineer corps which made the 
preliminary survey for the Chicago and Canada 



140 



SOUTH BEND, 



Southern Railroad, now known as the Wabash. 
He was then selected County Superintendent 
of Schools for St. Joseph County in 1878, and 
served in that office fourteen years and one 
month, when he resigned to accept the office of 
City Superintendent. As an evidence of his 
ability and the high esteem in which he is 
held in the community, Mr. Moon was unani- 
mously reelected to this office five times, thus 
proving the absolute nonpartisanship of the 
office. Under his superintendency of the city 
schools the number of scholars has increased 
from 3156 in 1892 to 4370 in 1899, and six hand- 
some new school buildings and a public library 
have been erected, while extensive additions 
and improvements have been made in other 
buildings. The schools of South Bend to-day 
rank with any in the country, and Mr. Moon 
gives undivided attention to them and has en- 
deared himself alike to the scholars, the teach- 
ers, the members of the board of education 
and the community. He was married to Miss 
Cynthia A. Stonehill, of this county, and has 
a family of five sons, the oldest of whom. 
James S. Moon, is connected with his father 
in the office. He resides in a commodious 
home located on Michigan avenue near Oliver 
street. 



D. D. BATES. 
Among the prominent and successful attor- 
neys practicing at the bar of St. Joseph County 
must be mentioned the name of Mr. Demas D. 
Bates, the junior member of the law firm of 
Brick & Bates of this city. He is a native of 
Indiana, and was born near Liberty, in St. 
Joseph County, November 4, 1S65, and is a son 
of Mr. Calvin Bates, who was a well known 
farmer in that locality. Mr. Bates' early boy- 
hood was spent upon the farm and he attended 
the district schools and afterward taught school 
in this county for nine years. During the in- 
tervals of teaching he was a student at the 
Northern Indiana Normal school at Valparaiso, 
and graduated from the law department of that 
institution in May, 1S93. He came to South 
Bend and the following June commenced the 
practice of his profession in this city, achiev- 
ing a well deserved prominence and succes.?. 
He was in business for himself until Septem- 
ber, 1S99, when he formed a partnership with 
Hon. Abraham L. Brick, under the style of 
Brick & Bates. Mr. Bates was elected Justice 
of the Peace of Liberty Township in 1S90, bu: 
resigned to prosecute his studies, and in the fall 
of 1S94 was elected to the same office in South 
Bend, in which he served with marked ability 
until 1898, when he resigned to accept the po- 
sition of Referee in Bankruptcy for the 13th Dist- 



rict tendered him by Judge Baker of the United 
States District Court, and resigned this position 
on connecting himself with Mr. Brick. In De- 
cember, 1899, he was elected County Attorney, 
which position he now holds. Mr. Bates has 
always taken an interest in political affairs 
ana during the campaign of 1898 was Chairman 
of the Republican Central Committee and a 
member of the Congressional Committee for the 
Thirteenth District, and in 1900 was Treasurer 
of the Central Committee. Mr. Bates is a care- 
ful and conscientious attorney well grounded 
in the law, and a leading practitioner at the 
bar. The firm is known as corporation attor- 
neys of prominence and acts as Counsel for the 
Indiana Railway Company, and the Lake Erie 
and Western Railway. Mr. Bates is highly 
esteemed in the community and is a director of 




D. D. BATES. 

the Commercial-Athletic Club, and a member of 
the Tribe of Ben Hur, the Modern Samaritans, 
the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of 
the Maccabees. He was married to Miss Lillie 
Bennett, who died February 6, 1S96, leaving 
him three children, and his present estimable 
wife was Miss Edith E. Kiefer, of this city, by 
whom he has two children. He resides with 
his family in a pleasant home at No. 129 South 
Laurel street. 



DR. E. P. MOORE. 

Dr. Edwin Percy Moore, one of the successful 
medical practitioners of South Bend is a na- 
tive of Prince Edwards Island, and was born 
August 22, 1870. After passing through the 



SOUTH BEND. 



141 



preliminary grades he attended the high school 
at Charlotte, Prince Edwards Island, which is 
known as the Prince of Wales College. After 
finishing his academical studies he entered the 




DR. E. P. MOORE. 

medical department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and graduated from that institution 
in May, 1893. He then received an appoint- 
ment, on a competitive examination, to Howard 
Hospital, Philadelphia. After three years prac- 
tice of medicine in his native city he took a 
post graduate course at Harvard College. Hav- 
ing friends in South Bend, and desiring to find 
a wider scope for his professional talents, Dr. 
Moore came here in 1895, and since that time 
has built up a successful and increasing prac- 
tice. While making no specialty of any branch 
of his profession he is an acknowledged author- 
ity on diseases of the stomach, and is a surgeon 
of skill and long experience. He is a gentle- 
man eminently qualified by nature and inclina- 
tion for his dignified and responsible calling, 
and has won the esteem of his patients and the 
community alike. Dr. Moore was married to 
Miss Marion Lawson Walsh, and with his 
family resides in a handsome home in one of 
the most delightful sections of the city He 
is a member of the leading medical societies 
of the west, including the American, the In- 
diana State, the St. Joseph County, and also 
the societies of Canada and Prince Edwards 
Island. He is a member of the Foresters' fra- 
ternity, an Odd Fellow, W. O. W. and the 
Knights and Ladies of Columbia, of which 
latter order he is also the medical examiner. 



DR. CHARLES STOLTZ. 

Dr. Charles Stoltz has acquired an enviable 
reputation as a physician of prominence and a 
medical practitioner of rare skill and knowl- 
edge. He is a native of Sumption Prairie, St. 
Joseph County. Indiana, and was born January 
17, 1864. His parents were of German an- 
cestry, but were residents of France for years. 
His family are essentially artisans in the higher 
sense, and Dr. Stolz is the only one for gene- 
rations who has shown a predeliction for pro- 
fessional life. His father was among the early 
settlers in this section of the state and was 
well known in the community. The doctor 
received his early education in the district 
schools and afterward he took a two years 
course at the Normal School at Valparaiso. 
For five years he was a teacher, part of which 
time he was principal of the Union Mills High 
School, his principle forte being the study of 
the sciences. After a year of study at th? 
University of Indiana, at Bloomington, he at- 
tended the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Chicago, now the Medical Department of ths 
University of Illinois, and graduated from that 
institution in 1S93. He was the historian of his 
class and a member of the executive committee, 
and subsequently president of the Alumni 
Association. For two years he was the assist 




UK. CHARLES STOLTZ. 



ant in the department of Embrylogy, and has 
been recognized as an authority in that in- 
teresting branch of the medical science. His 
papers on this subject which have been read 



142 



SOUTH BEND. 



before several of the leading medical societies 
of the west have received universal attention 
and materially added 10 his professional repu- 
tation. He has also prepared a number of 
papers on other subjects which have had wide 
circulation. Dr. Stoltz is by nature and incli- 
nation a physician of a high order, and in his 
younger days, when engaged in other pursuits, 
he studied medicine during tne intervals and 
thus fitted himself for the more onerous studies 
of the university. He is especially recognized 
as an expert surgeon and obstetrician although 
he has mastered every detail of his respon- 
sible profession, and his patients are among the 
leading families of the city and the surrounding 
country. He is a member of the medical staff 
of the Epworth Hospital and a lecturer on 
Anatomy in the Training School for Nurses 
attached to that institution He is also a mem- 
ber of the American, the National, the Indiana 
State, the Northern Tri-State and the St Jo- 
seph County Medical societies, and served one 
term as president of the latter body. He now 
holds the responsible position of examiner for 
a number of the leading old line life insurance 
companies and is one of the best equipped 
physicians in the local fraternity, having justly 
earned his present prominence. He was 
married to Miss Lillian Dunnahoo, of Warren, 
Ind., and with his family, which consists of 
one son, resides in a comfortable home at No. 
423 West Water street. His offices are located 
in the Tutt Building, corner of Main and Jeffer- 
son streets. 



Ward and served one term as Water Commis- 
sioner. On January 3. 1900 .Governor Mount 
appointed him as Police Commissioner and he 
has proved a most efficient officer He is a 



SAMUEL C LONTZ. 

Mr. Samuel C. Lontz, of the firm of Miller & 
Lontz, is a prominent business man of South 
Bend and a public spirited citizen. Mr. Lontz 
was born in the Cumberland Valley in Penn- 
sylvania, March 14, 1847 and is the son of 
Jonas Lontz, a typical German of the Keystone 
state. He attended school in Summit County, 
Ohio, and came to South Bend in 1S63 when 
he was but sixteen years of age Here he at- 
tended the public schools and afterward took 
a thorough commercial course He first en- 
gaged in the milling business with John H. 
Keedy, now deceased, at the foot of Washington 
street, after which he removed to Mishawaka 
and connected himself with William and Jo- 
seph Miller, who were engaged in the milling 
business. After nine years experience at Mish- 
awaka he formed a partnership with Joseph 
Miller and engaged in the wood, coal, feed, 
lime and cement business at the corner of 
Michigan and Water streets in this city, where 
they have built up a large and extensive busi- 
ness. Mr. Lontz has served two terms as a 
member of the City Council from the Fourth 




SAMUEL C. LONTZ. 

gentleman of strong characteristics and of 
sterling abilities and business sagacity He wa, 
married to Miss Jennie Martin of South Bend, 
and with his family of two sons resides at No. 
236 St. Louis s.treet. 



BARNEY C. SMITH. 

Mr. Barney C. Smith is one of the successful 
business men of South Bend and is the senior 
member of the firm of Smith & Jackson, whose 
extensive plant is located at No. 609 Michigan 
Avenue. Mr. Smith is a native of Germany, 
and was bo;n January 25, 1845. He is the son 
of Jacob Smith, and Catherine (Beach) Smith, 
and when he was but one year of age his parents 
came to America, and journeying west, located 
on a farm near South Bend, in Union Town- 
ship, St. Joseph County. Here his father died 
in 1869. Mr. Smith received his education in 
the vicinity of his home and was reared to the 
rigors of a farmer's lite, tilling the soil, and 
clearing the land in a new country In 1S75 
he came to South Bend and for several years 
was engaged in the lumber business with Mr. 
Newton Jackson, the father of Mr. Charles H. 
Jackson, with whom he is now associated in 
business. Here he familiarized himself with 
every essential detail of the lumber and planing 



SOUTH BEND 



143 



mill business, and in 1887, he formed a part- 
nership with the son ot his former employer, 
under the name of Smith & Jackson, which now 
holds a leading place among the important in- 
dustries of this city. Their establishment is 
one of the largest in the city and comprises 
extensive yards, office, factory and planing mill 
perfectly equipped with all the modern ma- 
chinery adaptable to this line. The firm manu- 
factures all kinds of lumber sash, doors, 
blinds, shingles, and their business is very 
large. Mr. Smith is an energetic business man 
of progressive ideas and is a thoroughly public 
spirited citizen. He is prominent in social and 
fraternal life and is a Mason, Knight of 
Pythias and Uniformed Rank, and is a member 
of the Commercial-Athletic Club. On April 30. 
1879, he was married to Mrs. Julia (Kimball) 



years of age Mr. Miller came west and located 
in Indiana, after which he engaged in business 
at Mishawaka as a miller and has been actively 
engaged since 1865. He married Martha Ann 
Scott on October 3, 1844, and she is still living 



V. " 




BAKSEY C. SMITH. 



Harmon, widow of Edwin Harmon and a 
daughter of Freeman Kimball, and resides at 
No. 521 North Scott street. 



JOSEPH MILLER. 

Mr. Joseph Miller, the senior member of the 
firm of Miller & Lontz, wood, coal, feed, lime 
and cement merchants, is a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and comes of a long line of honorable 
German ancestry. He was born in Lebanon 
County .February 27, 1823, and his father, Henry 
Miller, was a prominent farmer in that state 
and his ancestors fought valiantly in the Revo- 
lution and in the Mexican war. When fourteen 





JOSEPH MILLER. 

in excellent health. Two children were bor.i 
to them, but one, a daughter, was drowned 
in the St. Joseph river during a heavy freshei 
which occurred in 1870, which washed away the 
dam and bridges in the stream. Mr. Miller is 
still strong and vigorous and attends to his 
business despite his seventy-eight years and 
enjoys all the comforts of life at his home No. 
414 West Water street. He has been connected 
with Mr. Lontz over thirty years, and their 
extensive stores and warehouses are located 
at the corner of Michigan and Water streets. 



WILLIAM R. BAKER. 

Mr. William R. Baker, the popular and suc- 
cessful shoe merchant was born in this city 
and is a son of Darwin H. and Catherine 
(Roberts) Baker, tie was born October 21, 
1861, and his father was a business man here 
from 1852 until his death in 1891. Young 
Baker received his education in the public 
schools here and the high school, and for three 
years was engaged as a clerk in a dry goods 
store. He was then connected with his father s 
boot and shoe business and has been identified 
with it since. When his father died he as- 
sumed charge of his interest, and in 1898 he 
purchased the interest of his uncle, and changed 



144 



SOUTH BEND. 



the firm to the present style, W. R. Baker & 
Co. Mr. Baker is a progressive and energetic 
business man, thoroughly conversant with all 
the details of his business, and his handsome 




\VM. 11. BAKER. 

store is locaed at No. 114 West Washington 
street He is a member of the Indiana Club 
and of the Knights of Pythias . He is a direc- 
tor of the Citizens National BanK and treasurer 
of the Citizens Loan and Trust Company, and 
a director in the Building and Loan Association 
of South Bend. Mr. Baker was married to Miss 
Anna Vinson of South Bend, but this estimable 
lady died recently, leaving him with one little 
girl. He is highly esteemed and one of the 
most successful of the younger merchants of the 
city. 



LEO. ELIEL. 



Mr. Leo Eliel, of this city, ranks deservedly 
high as a pharmacist and is a prominent mem- 
ber of the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. Mr. Eliel is a native of Northern Ger- 
many and was born October 26, 1845. His 
father, Louis Eliel was a prominent physician 
and came to Laporte, Ind., when his son, Leo, 
was eleven years of age. Mr. Eliel received his 
early education in Germany, and on coming to 
Laporte he attended the public schools and 
afterward engaged in the drug business. For 
years he served a practical apprenticeship in 
that profession. in 1873 he came to South Bend 
and engaged in his chosen profession, and his 
handsome pharmacy is located at the southeast 



corner of Lafayette and Washington streets. 
He also took a short course in the Purdue 
University, at Laiayette, Ind., in the study of 
chemistry and bacteriology. He has been a 
member of the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation for a number of years, and since 1891 
has been the chairman of the committee on 
Revision of the American Pharmacopaeia, one 
of the most important comittees of that body. 
He is also a member of the Indiana Pharma- 
ceutical Association, and is a most thorough 
analyist, chemist and pharmacist. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and of the 
Commercial-Athletic Club. Mr. Eliel enjoys 




I.EO. EIJKL. 



a high reputation among the leading members 
of the medical profession and has won the con- 
fidence and esteem of the community. 



CHARLES COONLEY. 

Mr. Charles Coonley, the well known phar- 
macist of South Bend, whose popular estab- 
lishment is located at the corner of Michigan 
and Washington streets, is a native of this city 
and was born in the same block where his 
store now stands, May 29, 1849 He is the son 
of Benjamin and Emily (Merriman) Coonley. 
and his father came here in 1847 and engaged 
in the mercantile business. He attended the 
public schools and when he was eighteen years 
of age he engaged in the nursery business with 
a prominent house in St. Louis and later be- 
came a partner in the business, and traveled 



SOUTH BEND 



145 



through Missouri, Texas and Arkansas. In 
1873 he was connected witn his brother, who 
was in the drug business nere, and afterwards 
became the sole proprietor. Mr. Coonley took 







CHABLES COONLEY. 

a course in chemistry at the University of 
Michigan and afterward studied one season at 
Hanover, Germany. He is a thorough chemist 
and his store is one of the best fitted and 
stocked in South Bend He is also the proprie 
tor of the Coonley Remedy Company, which 
compounds a variety of standard remedies. Mr. 
Coonley is a business man of high standing 
and widely esteemed in the community. He is 
a member of the Commercial-Athletic Club. He 
was married to Miss Grace Listenberger an:! 
with his family, consisting of one son and 
daughter, resides at No. 311 West Colfax avenue. 



KLIAK1M BRIGGS. 

Mr. Eliakim briggs, whose death occurred in 
this city on September 19. 1861, was one of 
the earliest and most prominent of our citi- 
zens and may be said to have been the firsi 
to establish a manufacturing industry in this 
city. This was in 1841 when South Bend was 
but a struggling village of but 500 inhabitants, 
and gave but little promise of the energetic 
city it has sine become. Mr. Briggs was a 
native of New York and was born in Washing- 
ton County, in that state, August 3, 1795. On 
leaching man's estate he removed to Fort Cov- 
ington, in Franklin County, N. Y., where he 



was engaged in the foundry business for several 
years, during which time he was engaged in 
perfecting his invention, which was known as a 
traveling threshing machine, and which he 
afterward manufactureu very extensively. In 
1836 Mr. Briggs, who desired to seek a more 
promising and wider field for his labors, de- 
cided to come west and temporarily located 
at Dayton. Ohio, which he had previously 
visited. With his family he traveled by wagon 
and boat and after several stoppages on the 
journey he arrived at Columbus, Ohio, where 
he spent a short time with his brother, Dr. 
James Briggs, who was practicing his profes- 
sion in that city. He then pursued his journey 
to Dayton, where he at once engaged in busi- 
ness with Thomas Clegg, and the firm manufac- 
tured the threshing machines, the invention 
of Mr. Briggs. He remained in Dayton about 
three years and was one of its foremost citi- 
zens, when he removed to Richmond, Ind., 
where he was engaged in business about one 
year. In the fall of 1841 he came to Soutn 
Bend, and resided here until his lamented 
death. His first residence was located at th;> 
Northeast corner of Michigan and Jefferson 
streets, and he erected his factory on the lot 
immediately adjoining on the north, where he 
used a wind mill to furnish the motive power 




ELIAKIM BRIG! IS. 

for his works. Here he remained until 1844, 
when his increasing business necessitated a re- 
moval to a more commodious building, and he 
erected his factory at the southwest corner of 



146 



SOUTH BEND 



Wayne street and Vistula avenue, and these 
buildings were only removed during the past 
year. Mr. Briggs removed his residence to the 
large frame building at the northwest corner 
of Wayne street and Vistula avenue. He em- 
ployed a large force of men and many of the 
older citizens of South Bend, who afterward 
became prominent in business, were employed 
by him. The traveling threshing machine was 
very popular and in great demand and farmers 
from Indianapolis, Richmond, Lafayette ana 
other points came here to order or purchase 
machines, and were most hospitably entertain- 
ed at the home of the genial and generous man- 
ufacturer. His home was always open to his 
friends and he was known as a most affable 
and liberal hearted man. Mr. Briggs was one 
of the most energetic and pushing of men. So- 
cial and hospitable, his home was always the 
resort of his farmer customers and of traveling 
ministers of the Universalist faith, and he 
never wearied in entertaining his numerous 
and appreciative visitors. His warm hearted 
sympathy with the suffering and oppressed 
early led him to espouse the cause of the slaves 
of the South, and as an ardent Abolitionist he 
contributed liberally to the operations of what 
was known as the "underground railroad." 
Death came before he realized the great desire 
of his heart, the liberty of the slave, and the 
removal of the curse of slavery from the land. 
Mr. Briggs was married to Miss Rosina Allen, 
of Chateaguay, Franklin County, N. Y., who 
was a most estimable lady, and who survived 
him but one year. He had a family of five 
children four of whom are still living, among 
whom is Mrs. Janette Reynolds, of this city, 
widow of the late Major Ethan S. Reynolds, a 
prominent citizen of South Bend. His death 
was mourned by a large circle of friends, and 
his memory still lives with many of our honor- 
ed citizens who knew and loved him for his 
many virtues and manly qualities. 



DWIGHT DEMING. 

Mr. Dwight Deming, whose sudden and la- 
mented death occurred on September 26, 1880, 
was one of the best known business men in this 
city and in Northern Indiana. He was a man 
of forceful character, of progressive ideas and 
always cherished a warm regard for South 
Bend and its people. Mr. Deming was a native 
of Vermont, and was born at Castleton, in that 
state, February 16, 1824. He was the son of 
the late Judge John J. Deming, who came to 
Mishawaka in 1834 and who was one of the 
most influential factors in the growth and de- 
velopment of that city. With Col. John H. Orr, 
J. E. Hollister and Phil. Hurd, Judge Deming 



organized the old St. Joseph Iron Co., for the 
manufacture of iron from the bog ore found in 
large quantities in that locality, and later he 
was elected Probate Judge, which office he 
held until 1856, when he removed to Califor- 
nia, where he died. Dwight Deming received 
an excellent education, and at the age of 
22 years was married to Miss Cornelia Nicar. 
a daughter of the late Robert B. Nicar, who 
at one time was County Treasurer of St. Jo- 
seph County. Mr. Deming taught school at 
Mishawaka for a short time when he came to 
South Bend and engaged in the drug, book and 
stationery business. In 1856 he returned home 
and engaged in the hardware business with his 
father-in-law under the firm name of R. B. 
Nicar & Co. After the war and the return of 




DWIGHT DEMING. 

Capt. Edwin Nicar, the father disposed of his 
interest to nis sons Edwin and Virginius, and 
the firm was changed to Nicar, Deming & Co. 
Later Virginius Nicar retired and the firm be- 
came Deming & Nicar until 1874, when Mr. 
Deming retired with a competency. He pur- 
chased the old "Exchange" property on Mich- 
igan street and transformed it into a handsome 
hotel, which he called the Dwight House, 
which was the leading hotel in this city in its 
day, and which was under the management of 
Mr. Deming himself. Mr. Deming was also 
interested in the erection of the "Lincoln 
Block" on Michigan street wnich was the most 
imposing business block on the street. During 
the panic of 1873 he suffered serious losses, 



SOUTH BEND 



it; 



but with undiminished courage and unflagging 
energy he sought to rebuild his shattered for- 
tunes. He went to California at the suggestion 
of his brother-in-law, Charles Crocker, the Pa- 
cific coast millionaire, but his love for South 
Bend proved too strong for him to remain 
away, and he soon returned here, where he 
successfully engaged in the wood, coal and lime 
business and soon commanded an extensive 
trade. While engaged in tnis business he was 
taken suddenly ill and died of valvular dis- 
ease of the heart. Mr. Deming was a public 
spirited citizen and an active politician. He 
was elected by the Republican party as County 
Commissioner in 1872 and later was chosen 
for the same office by the Democrats and was 
County Commissioner at the time of his death. 
He was also elected to represent the Fourth 
Waid in the city council, and at one time was 
a candidate for Mayor of the city. Mr. Deming 
was always an active and progressive business 
man and was warmly esteemed by the entire 
community of South Bend who knew and 
appreciated his many sterling qualities, and 
who sincerely mourned his death. Mr. Dem- 
ing left surviving him a widow and six chil- 
dren. An only son, George, died in Chicago in 
1869, and his widow and a daughter, Mrs 
Wayne McMichael, have since died, and the re- 
maining descendents of Mr. Deming are, Mrs 
C. G. Hudnutt, Mrs. A. H. Kelley, and Mrs. F. 
Louis Stedman, of this city, and the youngest 
daughter Kate, who is married and resides at 
Rhineland, Wis. 



H. W. KREIGHBAUM. 

Elder Hiram W. Kreighbaum, treasurer 01 
the Wells & Kreighbaum Manufacturing Com- 
pany, builders of extension and parlor tables, 
at No. 1306 South High street, is a native of the 
Buckeye state and was born on a farm, near 
the line of Summit and Starke Counties, near 
Akron, Ohio, September 18, 1846. Mr. Kreigh- 
baum comes of Pennsylvania ancestry, although 
his father, William K. Kreighbaum, was born 
on the farm where he first saw the light of 
day. His mother, Rufina (Markel) Kreigh- 
baum, was a most estimable lady, and brought 
her son up in the light of true Christianity. 
When he was but six years of age his parents 
removed to Elkhart County, Indiana, on a 
farm two miles south of the city of Elkhart, 
which was then, in 1852, a straggling hamlet 
with but six small stores. The Lake Shore & 
Michigan Southern Railroad had been built but 
a year previous, and the country, sparsely set- 
tled, teemed with wild game. The farm upon 
which the family located was upon the old stage 
road east and west. Here young Kreighbaum 



was reared. He worked on the farm in the 
summer and attended the country schools in 
the winter, receiving such an education as did 
the country boy of a half century ago. In the 
spring of 1871, or when he was twenty-five 
years of age, Mr. Kreighbaum married Miss 
Mariella W. Wenger, the only daughter of Mr. 
Martin L. Wenger, a pioneer settler of St. Jo- 
seph County, whose farm of 160 acres is now a 
part of the city of South Bend, and upon which 
is located the large manufacturing plant with 
which Mr. Kreighbaum is now identified. 
When Mr. Kreighbaum located here on a farm, 
South Bend had but few over 7,000 people, and 




H. W. KREIGHBAUM. 

for several years he sold milk through the 
village and knew nearly every resident. In the 
fall of 1879 he bought a large farm south of 
the city and built a saw mill, and was for 
several years engaged in the lumber and saw 
mill business. In February, 1882, Mr. Kreigh- 
baum, who is a member of the Society of 
Dunkards, was elected to the ministry of the 
German Baptist Brethern, and since that time 
has been active in the pulpit. In 1895 he built 
a substantial residence on Vistula Avenue, 
where he now resides. In 1900 he was elected 
treasurer of the Wells & Kreighbaum Manufac- 
turing Company, ot which he had been a stock- 
holder since 1898. The enterprise is one of the 
large and representive ones of our city. Mr. 
Kreighbaum for a number of years taught vo- 
cal music at Elkhart and Harris' Ferry, before 
coming to South Bend. 



148 



SOUTH BEND. 



ISAAC GORSUCH. 

One of the oldest and one of the most highly 
esteemed among the early merchants of this 
city is Mr. Isaac Go; such, who, although he has 
passed the venerable po nt of four score years. 




/m w\ 



private interests. He early saw the advantages 
of Washington street as a residence thorough- 
fare, and was among the first to build a home 
on that beautiful avenue. Mr. Gorsuch was 
twice married, his first wife being Miss Ma:y 
Gass, of Dayton, Ohio who died, and his pre- 
sent wife was M'ss Maria Forbes, of St. Joseph, 
Michigan. He has one son, Wilber E. Gorsuch. 
who is a prosperous farmer. Mr. Gorsuch was 
one of the early memoers of the First Methodist 
church of this city, and still takes an active 
interest in its affairs. His pleasant home is 
located at No. 709 West Washington street, 
and here amid the comforts of domestic lit 3 , 
he is enjoying the fruits of his labors, and the 
esteem and friendship of the community in 
which he has so long been an honored resident. 




HON. WILLIAM MILLER. 

Hon. William Miller, the honored president 
of the South Bend National Bank, whose death 
occurred in this city. February 21. 1901. at his 
home, No. 321 Noith Michigan street, was well 
known in this community and was one of its 
most highly esteemed citizens. He was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, and was born in Lebanon 
County. March 16, 1821. Mr. Miller's ancestry 



ISAAI GORSUl II. 

is still in the enjoyment of excellent health and 
vigor. Mr. Gorsuch is a native of Maryland, 
and was born near Baltimore on February 1. 
1818. He is a son of Elijah uorsueh, a well 
known shoe manufacturer in that locality, and 
of Savannah (Gore) Gorsuch. When he was 
but ten years of age his parents removed to 
the West, traveling in wagons over the moun- 
tains and plains, and located in Dayton. Ohio. 
Here the young man attended school, and after- 
ward learned the trade his father had followed 
before him. Mr. Gorsuch came to South Beni 
in 1847, when this city was in its infancy, and 
at once engaged in the shoe business for him- 
self on Michigan street between Washington 
street and Colfax avenue. He early imbibed a 
firm confidence in the future development of 
South Bend, and with keen foresight pui- 
chased several tracts of land on the outskirts, 
but which have long since become a part of 
the growing city. Time proved the wisdom of 
his course, and he has realized his most san- 
guine expectations in the advancement of real 
estate values. He is the owner of Gorsuch's 
Addition in the Southwestern part of the city, 
and of other valuable properties. He retired 
from active business in 1870, and since that 
time has devoted himself to the care of his 




% 



WILLIAM MTLLER. 

is German, and his great-grandparents came 
to America early in the seventeenth century 
and fought in the war of the revolution. They 
were sturdy and piosperous farmers, and 



SOUTH BEND. 



149 



Henry Miller, his father, followed the same 
vocation. In 1837 Mr. Miller's father came 
west with his family, traveling the entire dis- 
tance in wagons, and located in Portage Town- 
ship, which is now a portion of the city of 
South Bend, and afterward removed to Beriian 
County, Michigan. Mr. Miller spent his early 
years on the farm, and was but sixteen years 
of age when his father came to this county. 
His early education was acquired in the coun- 
try schools. He first commenced his business 
career in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
obtained a position as clerk, and on coming 
to South Bend he filled similar positions, but 
in 1849 he made the overland journey to the 
gold fieids of California, where he remained 
three years. Returning again to this city, he 
was engaged on the Illinois Central Railroad 
ia the construction of that portion of the line 
fiom the Calumet river to Kankakee, Illinois, 
which occupied his time until 1854. After that 
he was engaged in the milling business, pur- 
chasing the old Henricks' hour mill, until 1869, 
when he retired and entered the office of the 
old Bank of the State of Indiana, which he aft- 
erward incorporated as the South Bend Nation- 
al Bank, and With whose progress and develop- 
ment he was prominently identified until his 
death. He was cashier of the bank for over 
twenty years, and afterward became its presi- 
dent, which important position he held when 
he died. For three years he was president of 
the Peninsular Railroad, now part of the Indi- 
ana Division of the Grand Trunk system. He 
was also piesident of the Mishawaka Paper and 
Pulp Company, and was interested in a number 
of other business enterprises. He was twice 
elected Mayor of the city, most ably performing 
the duties of that exacting office, and was a 
most important factor in the adoption of the 
present water works system. He served as a 
member of the City Council, and ever labored 
in the interests of the city. He was an able 
business man of the nighest type, a public 
spirited citizen, and enjoyed the esteem of the 
entire community. Mr. Miller was married 
three times, but his wife died several years 
before him, and he lett several children surviv- 
ing him. His death was deeply depioied by all. 



HORATIO P. BLAIR 

Mr. Horatio P. Blair, who may justly be 
termed one of the fathers of the present low 
pressure steam heating system and the utiliza- 
tion of exhaust steam, has been engaged in busi- 
ness in South Bend since 1894. He was born at 



Collinsville, Hartford County, Conn., October 
2S, 18o9, and is the son of Charles and Eunice 
(Blodgettl Blair. He attenued the public 
schools there and assisted his father in his 
shop and at the forge. In 1854 his father made 
the pikes for the famous John Brown, of Osa- 
watomie, and which he designed for use in 
his historical raid, and young Horatio assisted 
in drawing these pikes under the trip hammer. 
At the age of eighteen he started in life for 
himself as a ckrk in a store at Muscatine, 
Iowa, but in the same year returned home and 
engaged as a clerk in the hardware business 
in Hartford. In 1860 he started in the steam 
heating business in Hartford and remained 
there for twelve years, and studied at night to 
perfect himself in his profession. He then 




noiiATio p. ULAIR. 

went to Boston and was engineer for Walker, 
Pratt & Co. for eight years, passing tnrough 
the great fire of that city. In 1880 he was 
connected in a similar capacity with E. H. 
Cooke & Co. and worked at Rochester and El- 
mira, N. Y., until 1886, when Mr. Cook died, 
and he came to Chicago, and took charge of 
the branch there He was also engineer for 
Edward P. Bates of Syracuse, N. Y., and in 
1894 he came to South Bend where he has cince 
been engaged in business. Mr. Blair was 
engaged in building the large works of the 
Danvers, Mass., Insane Asylum, the new Peni- 
tentiary at Concord Mass., also tne heating ana 
plumbing of the State Capitol at Hartford, Ct 
He also worked in the same line on the mag- 



150 



SOUTH BEND. 



nificent Capitol building at Albany, N. Y., the 
Ogdensburg anu Mattewan Insane Asylums, 
and was the engineer for the Board of Trade 
building in Chicago, and the new House of 
Parliament in Toronto, Can. Later he was the 
engineer tor the great Cupple s warenouses in 
St. L,ouis, the largest plant of its kind in th^ 
world, and for a number of important build- 
ings anu plants extending from Prince Edwards 
Island to the Pacific Coast, and in all has bee-i 
successful. In South Bend Mr. Blair has put 
in the heating plants of the Oliver Opera House, 
the magnificent new Oliver Hotel, and has 
thoroughly remodeled the heating system at 
the works of the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., 
St. Mary's Academy, and supplied the plumb- 
ing and steam heating for the new Court 
House. Prior 10 coming here he was also en- 
gineer for the mammoth Gilbert Car Works 
at Troy, N. Y. Mr. Blair is a thorough en- 
gineer and is one of the pioneers of the present 
systems of steam and hot water heating, and 
he has trained some of the most successful 
men in this line in the east. Not until ha 
came to South Bend was Mr. Blair engaged 
in the plumbing and gas fitting business, but. 
finding it a necessity, he added it as a branch 
of his former line, and has furnished some of 
the finest residences here Mr. Blair is asso- 
ciated in business with Mr. David Westbury, 
who for years acted as his able superintendent. 
Mr. Blair is a gentleman who has won the 
esteem of the entire community. In early 
years he was active in politics and was the 
originator of the famous "Lincoln Wide 
Awakes," and president of the first meeting of 
the original "38," the first uniformed body that 
ever took part in a political parade. He was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Powers, of Hartford, 
Conn., and resides at Mishawaka. 



W. A. RUTHERFORD. 

The present treasurer of tne City of Soutii 
Bend, Mr. William A. Rutherford, is an invalu- 
albe official whose efficient and conscientious 
services are recognized by the entire com- 
munity, and who has been retained in his res- 
ponsible position for three successive term.-. 
Mr. Rutherford is a native of St. Joseph 
County, and was born October 16, 1850. His 
father Jessie V. Rutherford, was identified 
witn the mercantile interests of the city for 
many years and was well known in this com- 
munity. Young Rutherford's education was ac- 
quired in the public schools of this city, and 
after leaving rchool he was identified with the 
business of photography for nearly five years. 
After that he was successfully connected with 
the grocery business and proved himself a wise, 



energetic and prosperous merchant. In 1892 
the citizens of South Bend elected him to the 
office of City Treasurer, and so ably has he 
performed the duties of that responsible and 
honorable office that he has retained and in- 
creased the confidence of the people who have 
insisted in retaining him in office ever since. 
He has been twice re-elected ana each year of 
his incumbency of the office adds to his popu- 




W. A. KUTITEKFOKD. 

larity The annual receipts of the office 
amount to over half a million dollars and the 
business, under his management, is conducted 
with the promptness and strict business meth- 
ods of a National Bank. Mr. Rutherford was 
married to Miss Jennie Bucker, of South Bend, 
and resides in a pretty home at No. 322 North 
Michigan street. 



W. B. HOLLINGSWORTH. 

Mr. W. B. Hollingsworth, the president of 
the City Ice Company of South Bend, has been 
connected with the ice business in varioti3 
capacities for a number of years, and thorough- 
ly understands every detail of the business and 
the production of artificial ice. He was bom 
in Rush County, Indiana, January 19, 1S62, the 
son of Valentine and Mary (Reid) Hollings- 
wortn. He attended the Spiceland Academy, 
in Henry County, and his first essay in business 
was as a traveling salesman for a prominent 
candy manufacturer in Indianapolis, and after- 



SOUTH BBND. 



151 



ward lie engaged in the ice business in that 
city with Mr. A. Caylor. He was also interested 
in the management o£ the City Ice Company 
and organized the Artificial Ice and Cold 




W. B. HOLliINGSWOKTII. 

Storage Company at Indianapolis, o£ which he 
had entire charge. Mr. Hollingsworth came to 
South Bend in 1896 as manager of the Maxin- 
kuckee Ice Company, and remained with that 
enterprise until its consolidation with the pre- 
sent corporation whoses president he now is. 
He is a business man of sterling worth and ex- 
perience and has managed the affairs of the 
company with skill and energy. He was 
married in 1887 to Miss Hattie A. Hinshaw, of 
Knightstown, Henry County, Indiana, and re- 
sides at No. 229 South William street. 



CHARLES STEELE. 
Mr. Charles Steele has been prominently 
identified with the advancing commercial in- 
terests of South Bend for more than a quarter 
of a century and is a successful merchant and 
manufacturer He is a native of Canajoharie, 
N. Y., and was born August 11, 1845. His father, 
John Steele, was a contractor and builder 
in that locality. He was educated in the publio 
schools of his native town, r.nd there also 
learned the trade of harness maker beginning 
in 1862. He was a volunteer in the war of the 
Rebellion and enlisted in the 193rd New York 
Regiment, in 1867 Mr. Steele left his old homn 
and went to Chicago where he worked at his 



trade and in the spring of 1870 he removed 
to Dowagiac, Mich., where he founded the firm 
of Heath & Steele, which continued in business 
two years, and in 1872 removed to South Bend. 
The firm occupied a frame building on the 
ground where the Tribune Store is now, which 
burned in 1873, and then bought the building 
now occupied by the Tribune Company, and 
afterward located in the present building ar. 
132 North Main street The firm was dissolved 
in 1885 and Mr. Steele has conducted the busi- 
ness since that time. In 1891 Mr. Steele pur- 
chased the plant of the Standard Gig Saddlerv 
Company, of Jackson Mich., which he removed 
during the same year to South Bend Here he 
formed a stock company under the style of the 
Steele & Hovey Mfg. Co., and in connection with 
patent leather they added the manufacture of 
harness. The factory was located on the race, 
and in the spring of 1892 Mr. Steele disposed of 
his interest and afterward the South Bend 
Saddlery Company was formed. In 1895 tb.3 
plant was purchased by the Studebaker Bros. 
Mfg. Co. Mr. Steele owns and occupies his 
present building which contains an extensive 
stock of high grade harness, whips, blanket.3, 
horse goods of every variety, trunks, satchels 
and saddlery hardware He is an extensive 
manufacturer of and wholesale dealer in sad- 




CHAELES STEELE. 

dlery hardware and horse dress goods and 
makes a specialty of a high grade of custom, 
harness, and is also a wholesale and retail 
mei-chant whose trade extends from New York 



152 



SOUTH BEND 



to Nebraska. Mr. Steele is a practical and en- 
ergetic business man and gives his personal 
supervision to every detail and department of 
his large and increasing business. He is one 
of the most energetic and reliable merchants 
in this city and has earned his present promi- 
nence and commercial success by his own 
efforts. He is a puolic spirited citizen and a 
member of the Odd Fellows fraternity and o( 
Norman Eddy Post, G. A. R. He was married 
to Miss Henrietta Moon whose father, John 
Moon, was one of the early pioneers of Indiana 
and settled in this county, where he assisted 
in building the old Michigan plank roao.. 



JOSIAH P. PEED. 

Mr. Josiah P. Reed, the present County Re- 
corder of St. Joseph County, is a representative 




JOSIAH P. REED. 

Indiana gentleman of the progressive type. He 
was born in Liberty Township, St. Joseph 
County. January 15, 1851, and his father, J )hn 
Reed, was one of the pioneer farmers of this 
section, having emigrated from Starke Couin f, 
Ohio, in 1847. The son was educated in the 
district schools and worked on the farm until 
he was twenty-three years of age, and then he 
took a course of studies at the Valparaiso Col- 
lege. He was a studious scholar and taught in 
the district schools of Union Township for 
several years, after which he engaged in the 
mercantile business at Lakeville, under the 
firm name of Reed & Shanower He was ap- 
pointed Post Master at Lakeville by President 



Harrison, and was afterward connected with 
the Vandalia railroad for two years. In 189.'. 
Mr. Hildebrand was elected County Recorder 
and appointed Mr. Reed as his deputy, which 
office he so ably filled, that at the next election, 
upon Mr. Hildebrand declining to be a candi- 
date, Mr Reed was nominated and elected. 
He has filled the ardous and responsible du- 
ties of the office with ability and fidelity and 
has won the regard of all who know him or 
have had occasion to transact business with 
his office. He is a plain man of the people, 
a conscientious official and an energetic citizen 
In earlier years he was chosen as Township 
Trustee of Union Township for two terms. 
Mr. Reed was married to Miss Frances Crocker, 
of Lakeville, and has two children, and resides 
at TOT Sherman avenue. 



G. R. SUMMERS. 

Mr. Gabriel Rush Summers, the well knowT 
manufacturer of sovereign remedies, and for 
many years engaged in the drug business in 
this city, is a native of St. Joseph County and 
has been associated with the commercial in- 
terests of South Bend for over twenty years. 
He was born at New Carlisle, March 13. 1857, 
and his father, Edward Summers, was a suc- 
cessful farmer in that locality He received his 
early education at the University of Notre 
Dame, and afterward removed to Clay Town- 




G. It. SIMMERS. 

ship, where he has resided ever since. Foranum- 
ber of years he was engaged in the agricultural 



SOUTH BEND 



153 



implement business at Walkerton, Ind., and 
afterward was associated with E. R. Vander- 
hoof, in the drug business in South Bend for 
five years. For about twenty years he has been 
engaged in the manufacture of proprietary 
medicines, under the firm name of E. R. Van- 
aerhoof & Co., and their splendidly equipped 
laboratory is located at No. 219% North Lafay- 
ette street, and for the past five years he has 
been in control of its extensive and increasing 
business. Mr. Summers is an active and en- 
ergetic business man, and is well known in the 
community t or several years he served as 
Trustee for Clay Township, and has always 
taken a deep interest in public affairs. He is 
fraternally associated with the Royal Arca- 
num, K. 0. T. M. and the Foresters. He was 
married to Miss Mercy A. Longley, and with 
his estimable wife and child resides on a fine 
farm in Clay Township. 



EDWARD. F. DUBAIL. 

Among the more prominent gentleman at 
present engaged in the real estate business in 
this city must be mentioned the name of Mr. 
Edward F. Dubail, who has been an important 
factor in the material development of South 
Bend and the vicinity. Mr. Dubail was bora 



business in which he was quite successful. 
Realizing the possibilities of the growth and 
advancement of South Bend, in 1892 Mr. Du- 
bail decided to engage in the real estate busi- 
ness and has continued in that vocation ever 
since. He was identified with the location and 
sale of the Bowman Place Addition, Bowman's 
Addition to the town of Myler, and Dubail's 
First Addition, and numerous other important, 
transactions in local realty He is also exten- 
sively engaged in the mortgage, loan and in- 
vestment business, and in this connection re- 
presents some of the leading citizens and 
financial institutions. He is the agent for the 
Norwich Union, of England; the American 
Central, of St. Louis; St. Paul Fire and Marine 
Ins. Co.; Northwestern National Indemnity, of 
New York; Franklin, of Indiana, and the Lon- 
don Assurance Corporation, and Palatine In- 
surance Company of England, and is con- 
nected with the South Bend Electric Company. 
His office is located in the Nippold Building, 
131 North Main street, with a branch office at 
411 South Chapin street. He was married to 
Miss Grace A. Bowman, of South Bend, and 
with his family, consisting of his son, Donald 
Edward Dubail, ten years old, resides at No. 
1S49 South Michigan street. 





EDWARD P. Dli.uA IL. 

in this city November 17, 1867, and his father, 
Peter Dubail, Sr., is well known in this com- 
munity. He received a liberal education in this 
city and afterward engaged in the grocery 



SAMUEL ADLER. 

One of the most prominent and successful 
merchants in this city is Mr. Samuel Adler, 
whose handsome store is located at Nos. 107 
and 109 South Michigan street, and No. 10S 
West Washington street. He has been, con- 
nected with the mercantile business of. South 
Bend since 1870, when as a boy, sixteen years 
of age, he was connected with firm of M. 
Livingston & Co., as a clerk. In a few years 
he was admitted to a partnership in the busi- 
ness, and in 1883 he severed his connection with 
this house, and with his brother, Moses Adler, 
established the firm of Adler Bros., which con- 
tinued until 1S91, when Moses Adler died, and 
Samuel purchased his interest and assumed full 
control of the extensive and increasing busi- 
ness. To-day Mr. Adler is one of the leading 
clothiers and furnishers in this city, and also 
ranks among the most important merchant 
tailors. The building and basement which lie 
occupies is filled with a choice line of cloths, 
clothing, furnishing goods, and hats and caps, 
all of the latest and newest designs. The trade 
of the establishment extends to all parts of the 
surrounding country where the name of Samuel 
Adler is a guarantee of excellence and moderate 
cost. Mr. Adler is a highly respected business 
man and a merchant of worth and standing 



154 



SOUTH BEND. 



and has earned his present success by his own 
energy and straightforward business methods. 
He was married to Miss Fannie Goldsmith, a 




SAMUEL ADI.ER. 

most estimable lady, from Aurora, 111., and re- 
sides at No. 1012 West Washington street. 



brother, Levi, in the dry goods business under 
the firm name of L. Chesnutwood & Co., and 
the brothers also conducted a warehouse and 
produce business in the same name. After 
three years Mr. Chesnutwood separated from 
his brother and took charge of the warehouse, 
which he managed for three years when the 
building fell in and he retired from that busi- 
ness. In 1S51 he came to South Bend, bringing 
with him a stock of goods opened a gen- 
eral store at No. 117 South Michigan street. 
He disposed of this business after a short time 
and then engaged in the saw mill business near 
Sumption Prairie, which he conducted for 
nearly three years. He served as township as- 
sessor for three years and then engaged in the 
lumber business with John Hammond, under 
the firm name of J. Hammond & Co., and 
afterwards ran a planing mill on the ground 
where the Singer Mfg. Co.'s plant is now lo- 
cated. In 1858 he was elected Recorder of St. 
Joseph County and served two terms, and was 
then appointed Collector of Internal Revenue 
for the Ninth District by President Grant. He 
served in this office for six years when the 
Ninth and Tenth districts were consolidated 
and he retired. He then established a cigar 
manufactory, which he conducted for four 



R. J. CHESNUTWOOD. 

For nearly half a century the name of Mr. 
Reese Jones Chesnutwood has been associated 
with the commercial and official history of this 
city. Mr. Chesnutwood has honorably passed 
the venerable period of four score years and is 
still in the enjoyment of health and vigor. He 
is a sturdy scion of that rare old Pennsylvania 
ancestry which has given to the western 
country so many sterling examples of sturdy 
manhood and the best types of progressive 
citizenship. Mr. Chesnutwood, or as he is 
more familiarly known, Judge Chesnutwood, 
was bom near the city of Reading, in Berks 
County, Pennsylvania, May 17, 1816. He is the 
son of Abraham Chesnutwood, a well known 
farmer in that locality, and Sarah (Jonesi 
Chesnutwood. In 1828 he came with his 
parents to Starke County, Ohio, where his 
father located on a farm in the woods near 
Canton, Ohio. In 1834 Mr. Chesnutwood went 
to Massillon. Ohio, where he learned the 
trade of a tanner, but his health becoming im- 
paired he was released from his indentures, and 
entering a hardware store in that city he work- 
ed for four years He then engaged with his 




K. J. CHESNUTWOOD. 

years, and in 1884 he was elected Justice of 
the Peace, in which office he served until 1892 
when he retired from active business alto- 
gether. Mr. Chesnutwood was always a man 



SOUTH BEND, 



155 



of strong characteristics, and was a prominent 
factor in public affairs. He is well known and 
highly esteemed in the community. He was 
married in 1842 to Miss Martha A. Fisher, a 
native of Philadelphia, who is now deceased, 
and his family consists of a son, R. J. Chesnut- 
wood, Jr., and a daughter, Mrs. Sarah F. Tay- 
lor, the wife of Thaddeus Taylor, of this city. 
Mr. Chesnutwood has lived a life of activity 
and honor, and his declining years are marked 
by the loving care of his children, and the 
warm regard of his fellow citizens and hosts 
of friends in South Bend. He resides with his 
daughter at No. 121 North Lafayette street. 



ELMER E. WELLS. 
Mr. Elmer E. Wells, president of the Wells & 
Kreighbaum Manufacturing Company, manu- 
facturers of fine extension and parlor tables, 
No. 1306 South High street, is a native of the 
Empire state and was Dorn at Avoca, Steuben 




ELMER E. WELLS. 

County, N. Y., April 24, 1861 He was the son 
of Alva Wells and Marietta (Smith) Wells. 
When but five years of age his parents came 
to South Bsnd, where his father was widely 
known as a manufacturer for many years. 
Young Wells was educated in the public schools 
of this city, and in 1876 began active business 
with his father in the manufacture of interior 
finish and wood work under the style of A. 
Wells & Son. This partnership continued for 
twenty years, when it was succeeded by the 
Wells Manufacturing Company. In 189S the 



Wells & Kreighbaum Manufacturing Company 
was organized and incorporated with Mr. Wells 
as President, which responsible position he 
now holds. The enterprise of which he is th-3 
head is one of the large industrial concerns ol 
our city and one that is truly typical of South 
Bend in push, growth ana enterprise. Mr. 
Wells is a careful and energetic business man 
and a citizen of usefulness. He was married 
in 1883 to Miss Lydia Folk, of St. Joseph 
County, and resides in a pretty home at No. 
1505 South Michigan street. 



DR. SAMUEL WHITEHALL. 

Dr. Samuel Whitehall, the president of the 
Dr. Whitehall Megrimine Company, and the 
originator and inventor of the celebrated and 
efficacious lemedies prepared by the company, 
is an eminent physician and chemist of long 
experience and practice in both professions. 
Dr. Whitehall is a native of Indiana, and was 
born at Attica, May 26, 1847. His father, Dr. 
A. L. Whitehall, was a practicing physician in 
that section of the state, and the son naturally 
imbibed a taste and inclination for the art 
curative. He attended the public schools of his 
native town, and later was a student at the 
University of Michigan, from which he giadu- 
ated in 1872, in the Departments of Medicine 
and Applied Chemistry. He is also a graduate 
of the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. After receiving his degree he practiced 
his profession at Attica tor four years, and for 
the same length of time he was located at 
Niles, Mich. He then returned to Attica and 
piacticed for a time, but lacer engaged in the 
drug business there. Dr. Whitehall had always 
made a specialty of the treatment of neivous 
disorders and headaches, and the preparation 
of the Megrimine Remedies was the result of 
years of close study and application. Their 
successful operation in his practice induced 
him to seek a wider fieid of ministiation, and 
he came to South Bend in 1888 and organized 
the Dr. Whitehall Megrimine Company, which 
has been in successful operation ever since. 
The company manufactures a number of stand- 
ard remedies which are known and used ex- 
tensively throughout the country with most 
beneficial results, chief of which are "Dr. 
Whitehall's Megrimine" and "Dr. Whitehall's 
Rheumatic Cure," which are prepared under 
his personal direction. 1'ne former is an in- 
stant and positive cure for headaches and neu- 
ralgia, and is absolutely fiee from all danger- 
ous narcotics. The Rheumatic Cure is a 
prompt and effectual cure for rheumatism and 



156 



SOUTH BEND 



gout, destroying the poison in the blood and 
eliminating it from the system. The office ot 
the company is in the Oliver Opera House 
block. Dr. Whitehall is also the inventor ot a 




..« & 




perous farmer in that locality and the young 
man received a liberal education in the public 
schools of Hazelton, Pa., and afterward at 
Dickson Academy, in the City of Williams- 
port. He pursued his medical studies in the 
Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, and 
graduated in the class of 1881. After his 
graduation he came to South Bend, where he 
practiced for a year, and then returned east, 
where he remained for five years, but realiz- 
ing the possibilities of the west, he returned 
to this city in 1887 and since that time has 
been in successful practice in South Bend and 
the vicinity. Dr. Hill is a prominent physician 
and surgeon and occupies an honored position 
in his chosen profession. He is the secretary 
of the Board of Health of St. Joseph County 
and is the medical examiner for a number of 
the leading life insurance companies of the 
country. He is also a member of the American 
Medical Association, and of the Indiana State, 
and St. Joseph County Medical Societies, and 
has contributed a number of valuable articles 



DR. SAMUEL WHITEHALL. 

number of valuable appliances and devices ot 
an electrical, medical and mechanical nature, 
and all of them practical and successful. He 
was the first to invent the e.astic suture and 
plaster, though they have now become of com- 
mon usage. He is the patentee of a number of 
agricultural devices, among them a wheel, a 
most valuable acquisition to agricultural im- 
plements. He has also lately been granted 
patents for transmitting and duplicating auto- 
graphic telegrams; also for a wonderful proc- 
ess for producing pictures in colors by teleg- 
raphy, with a number of other inventions 
equally novel and scientifically important. Dr. 
Whitehall is well known in the community, and 
is highly esteemed. He is a member of the 
Commercial-Athletic Club and of the A. O. 
U. W. He was married to Miss Elizabeth C. 
Everett, or Urbana, O., and with his family, 
consisting of one son, resides at No. 711 Colfax 
avenue. 



DR. JACOB W. HILL. 

Dr. Jacob W. Hill is a native of the Keystone 
state and was born in Centre Ton r nship, 
Columbia County, Pennsylvania, on September 
6, 1859. His father, Jacob Hill, was a pros- 




DIl. JACOB W. HILL. 

to the medical journals of the country. He is 
a member of several social and fraternial organ- 
izations and occupies an honored place in the 
community. 



FRANK H. DUXXAHOO. 

Mr. Fiank H. Dunnahoo is one of the ambi- 
tious, rising and successful young attorneys 
new practicing at the bar of St. Joseph Coun- 



SOUTH BEND. 



15? 



ty. He is a native of this county, and was 
horn April 5, 1S73. His father. Griffin S. 
Dunnahoo. is a successful farmer and is still 
living. As a boy Mr. Dunnahoo received his 




FRANK n. DUNNAHOO. 

early education in the public schools of St. 
Joseph County, after which he attended the 
University of Michigan and graduated from the 
Law Department in 1894. He was admitted 
to the bar during the same year, and at once 
commenced the practice of law. For nearly 
six years he was associated with Hon. A. L. 
brirk, of this city, and has been engaged in 
many of the most important causes which 
have been tried before the courts in this 
disirict. Mr. Dunnahoo is well giounded in 
the law, is a safe counselor and an able at- 
i.orney, and has earned his present standing 
in the profession by his own efforts. He is 
popular in the community, and is a member 
ot l he Indiana and Commercia'.-Athletic Clubs, 
the E ks and the Knights of Pythias frater- 
ni ifs. He was married to Miss Mary Alice 
Dunlap, of Bloomington, 111., on January 9, 
1900, and resides at No. 317 North Taylor 
street. 



COURTLAND P. DUCOMB. 

Mr. Courtland P. DuComb is one of the 
rising young attorneys of South Bend who 
have forced themselves to the fiont by their 
own superior abilities and tireless energy, and 



the strictest attention to their profession. Mr. 
DuComb had but few of the advantages of 
life in his early boyhood, and during hi? mi- 
nority he was obliged to contribute to the 
support of his family, while manfully strug- 
gling to acquire an education for himself. He 
was born in Lakeville, St. Joseph County, July 
12, 1872, his father. Philip P. DuComb, being 
then engaged in farming. Mr. DuComb was 
a typical farmer's boy. He hauled wood and 
stone for his father, and snatched what learn- 
ing he acquired during his early years by 
close and ardent study at home and from the 
limited opportunities afforded by the district 
school. At sixteen years of age he obtained 
an appointment as teacher, and while working 
laboriously at this vocation he studied various 
extra branches, which he regarded as essen- 
tial to his future advancement and progress. 
Until he was twenty-two years of age he 
cheerfully gave up his earnings to his father, 
and then, with scarcely means enough to liqui- 
date his matriculation fees, he entered DuPaw 
University, determined to support himself and 
acquire a collegiate education. Engaging his 
spare time in various pursuits, he succeeded 
in maintaining himself, and afterward entered 
the Indiana University, at Bloomington, Ind., 




COURTLAND P. DUCOMB. 

where he graduated with high honors in 1895. 
He was admitted to the bar and established an 
office in South Bend during that year, his 
library at that time consisting of three text- 



158 



SOUTH BEND. 



books and the Indiana statutes. He had not 
mistaken his calling, however, and he soon 
developed an ability and energy as a lawyer 
which gained for him both clients and friends. 
His early labors and sacrifices had imbued him 
with coinage and perseverance, and these two 
essential qualities were manifested in his prac- 
tice to a remarkable degree. He is a close 
student, quick to grasp the subtleties of deli- 
cate questions, and his power of legal analysis 
is almost unerring. To-day he is recognized 
as one of the most conscientious and finely 
equipped attorneys in this section of the state, 
and his clients are among the most promi- 
nent business men and citizens of South Bend. 
Mr. DuComb has been the Deputy Prosecuting 
Attorney of St. Joseph County for the past 
four years, and has had the preparation and 
conduct of a number of important cases during 
that period. He was married to Miss Clara B. 
Augustine, of West Marion street, a daughter of 
William Augustine, a wealthy retired farmer, 
and granddaughter of Michael Augustine, who 
was one of the earliest pioneers in this section 
of the country, and who is still living. Mr. 
DuComb has one child, and his handsome 
home is located at No. 519 West Marion street, 
he has hosts of friends, and is a prominent 
member of the fraternity of Odd Fellows. His 
office is at No. 12S South Main street. 



SAMUEL S. PERLEY. 

Mr. Samuel Shepard Perley, one of the best 
types of an active and energetic business man, 
is a native of New England, having been born 
at Portland, Maine, October 8, 1861. His father, 
J. H. Perley, was well known in the business 
world, and was the first president of the Board 
of Trade of Portland. His mother was Fannie 
(Smith) Perley. Young Perley lived at Port- 
land and attended school there until he was 
twelve years of age, when his patents removed 
to Detroit, Michigan, where his father was ex- 
tensively engaged in the lumber trade. Here 
he lived six years and attended school, and 
then came to South Bend, where he finished 
his course at Notre Dame, remaining there 
nearly four years. Leaving his studies, he en- 
tered the office of the Coquillard Wagon Works, 
where he has always remained. Mr. Perley 
has for many years held an executive position 
with the company, and since the death of Mr. 
a. Coquillard, the founder of the great busi- 
ness, he has been trustee and manager of the 
great plant and business. Mr. Perley is widely 
known as an energetic business man and a 
thoroughly public-spirited citizen. He is a di- 



rector in the Citizens' National Bank, and is 
president of the Perley Lumber Company, one 
of the large industries for which South Bend 
is noted. He is also a stockholder in the Bissell 
Chilled Plow Company, and is interested in 




SAMUEL S. PEKLEY. 



other enterprises here. Mr. Perley was mar- 
ried in xS92 to Miss Lillian Cassidy, of this 
city. 



JAMES A. JUDIE. 

Mr. James A. Judie. of South Bend, is a 
prosperous and ambitious attorney and real 
estate agent, and a striking example of what 
may be accomplished by indomitable energy 
and intelligence. Mr. Judie was born in Penn 
Township, St. Joseph County, July 29, 1865, 
and his father was Paul Judie, a prosperous 
but conservative farmer, who came of sturdy 
Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry, and wfi"o early 
sought this section of the State of Indiana as 
his home. As a boy Mr. Judie was sent to the 
country schools in the vicinity of his home, 
but aspiring for a higher education, by his own 
efforts he secured the means to enable him to 
attend the State Normal School at Valparaiso, 
where he completed the teachers' course and 
followed that vocation for one year. Later he 
entered the College of Notre Dame at South 
Bend, graduating from the Law Department in 
1S87. Attracted by the advantages offered to 
the investor by the State of California, Mr. 



SOUTH BEND. 



150 



Judie, after his graduation, journeyed to that 
state, where he remained a year. Returning 
to South Bend, in 1S88, he commenced the 
practice of law, and for one year was ; n the 




JAMES A. JTJDIE. 

office of Judge Lucius Hubbard, after which 
he engaged in business on his own account. 
Mr. Judie is a conscientious attorney and reli- 
able adviser, and is thoroughly posted on real 
estate values throughout the county, and 
ranks deservedly high at the bar in the com- 
munity. His practice is largely devoted to pro- 
bate and real estate law, and he is also an 
extensive dealer in and holder of valuable 
properties in South Bend. Mr. Judie is quiet 
and modest, but is imbued with an honorable 
ambition to succeed, and has made praise- 
worthy progress on the road to honor and 
success. He was married to Miss Margaret I. 
Knott, of Laporte County, and with his estima- 
ble wife and inteiesting daughter resides in 
a comfortable home at No. 1245 East Water 
street. 



PROF. DUMONT LOTZ. 

Professor Dumont Locz. the able principal 
of the South Bend High School, is a native of 
Indiana, and was born at Portland, October 
27, 1863. His father, Mr. Jacob E. Lotz, was 
a successful farmer and stock raiser in that 
section of the state, and was at one time 
Sheriff of Jay County. The young man spent 



his early yeais on the farm, and attended the 
public schools in the vicinity of his home, and 
the Normal School at Lebanon, O. He then 
taught school for about four years, and was a 
student at the Ohio Medical College, at Cin- 
cinnati, O.. but dm not engage in the practice 
of medicine. His health being somewhat im- 
paired. Professor Lotz engaged in travel 
throughout the western country for some time, 
and on his return he entered Purdue Univer- 
sity, from which institution he graduated in 
1889, with the degree of B. S., and in 1890 
took the advanced degrees of M. S. and A. C. 
He was appointed assistant professor of 
chemistry at the university, and during his 
connection with Purdue did a large amount 
of valuable work on food adulterations for the 
United States Government. He was elected 
chemist to the Oregon Agricultural Experiment 
Station, a government position connected with 
the Oregon Agricultural College, and was also 
State Chemist of Oregon for three years, and 
was located at Coivallis, Ore. Finding his 
health again impaired, Professor Lotz traveled 
extensively through Old Mexico and Central 
America, thoroughly exploring the old Aztec 
and Toltec ruins. Professor Lotz is a diligent 
and enthusiastic archaeologist, and has made 




PROF. DUMONT LOTZ. 

many valuable discoveries of ancient relics 
in Mexico, Central America, Alaska and other 
sections of the country, and has pursued an 
extensive course of chemical research for his 



160 



SOUTH BEND, 



own uses and purposes. He returned home in 
1895 and was elected teacher of science in 
the South Bend High School, and served in 
that position until 1S9S, when he was elected 
principal. Professor Lotz has pi oven a most 
thoroughly progressive and able principal, and 
also conducts the departments of chemistry 
and physics in that institution. He is a gen- 
tleman of broad culture, of extensive travel 
and experience, and a disciplinarian of rare 
power and mental force, who is regarded as a 
valuable acquisition to the advanced educa- 
tional institutions of this city. Professor Lotz 
was married in 1894 to Miss Nannie Bloss, a 
daughter of Hon. John M. Bloss. president of 
the Oregon Agricultural College and ex-Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction of Indiana, and 
with his estimable wife and two daughters 
resides in Chapin Park. 



THE REV. JOHN F. DE GROOT. C. S. C. 

The Rev. John Francis DeGroot, C. S. C, 
pastor of St. Patrick's Church, of South Bend, 
is one of the most esteemed and able pastors 



His father was Benjamin DeGroot. a native of 
Belgium, and a prosperous farmer of St. Joseph 
County, and his mother was Catherine (Woods) 
DeGroot, and she was a native of Ireland. 
Until he was fourteen years of age Father 
DeGroot lived at Mishawaka, and was educated 
in the parochial schools of St. Joseph County. 
In 1881 he entered Notre Dame Univeisity, 
taking a classical course, with a veiw to pre- 
paring for the priesthood, and he graduated 
from that famous institution in 1SS7. He later 
went to Austin, Texas, as Prefect of Disci- 
pline at St. Edwards' College, where he re- 
mained one year, when he was called to New 
Orleans, La., as Piefect of Discipline at the 
Holy College in the Crescent City. Here he 
remained four years. Father DeGroot was or- 
dained to the priesthood in 1893 at Notre Dame, 
by Bishop Rademacher, of Fort Wayne. While 
in New Orleans he was assistant pastor of 
Sacred Heart. In March, 1S99, Father DeGroot 
was called to South Bend as pastor of St. 
Patrick's Church, to succeed the late Father 
Clark. Under his careful and intelligent pas- 
torate the church has advanced in usefulness, 
and Father DeGroot has given to his charge 
his earnest thought and unselfish labor. He 
is a man of rare mental graces, a deep thinker 
and an eloquent speaker, and is loved by all 
who know him, regardless of church ties. 




jj 




REV. JOHN F. DEGROOT. 

this church has ever had. Yet a young man. 
Father DeGroot has won a high place in the 
church, and has evinced all of those qualities 
that must rapidly advance him in his chosen 
life. Father DeGroot is a native of Indiana, 
and was born in Mishawaka, August 27, 1866. 



FRANCIS E. LAMBERT. 
Mr. Francis E. Lambeit ranks justly high at 
the bar of St. Joseph County as an attorney 
of rare ability, a reliable counselor and a law- 
yer of research and extended reading. He was 
born in Warren Township, St. Joseph County. 
June 4, 1860, and his father, Oliver C. Lambert, 
who died when the son was but twelve years 
of age, was a prominent farmer in that locality. 
His early education was acquired in the county 
schools, and he afterward attended the Law 
School at Valparaiso tor four years. Dur- 
ing his attendance at this college he taught 
school, and he afterward attended the Law De- 
partment of the Commeicial College at South 
Bend, and trom 1887 to 1891 was principal of 
that excellent institution. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1891, and for a year was asso- 
ciated in the practice of law with Judge Lytel 
Jones, at Valparaiso. Then he came to South 
Bend and established himself in his profes- 
sion, in which he has occupied a prominent po- 
sition. In 1895 he was nominated as Repre- 
sentative to the State Legislature, and al- 
though the district had formerly been Demo- 
cratic, he was elected by a handsome majority, 



SOUTH BEND 



101 



and was reelected in 1897. As a legislator he 
was progressive, alert and able, and won the 
enconiums of his constituents. He is an able 
orator and as a political speaker has few sii- 




HON. FRANCIS E. LAMBERT. 

periors in the west. In October, 1SS9, he was 
appointed by Federal Judge John H. Baker as 
the Referee in Bankruptcy for the Thirteenth 
District, which office he now holds. He was 
married to Miss Mary E. Moomaw, who then 
resided near South Bend, and has one interest- 
ing daughter, Mildred. Mr. Lambert, while 
an active and enthusiastic leader in the politi- 
cal movements in the west, is also a highly 
domestic man, and his handsome home is lo- 
cated at No. 513 West Marion street. 



HON. HENRY GINZ. 

Among the prominent and influential citi- 
zens of South Bend who for years was active- 
ly interested in public affairs must De men- 
tioned the name of the late Hon. Henry Ginz, 
who died in this city November 1, 1888, deeply 
mourned by a large circle of friends. Mr. 
Ginz was born in Alzey, Rhein-Hessen, Ger- 
many, February 6, 1830. He received his edu- 
cation in his native land and there learned 
the cabinet maker's tiade, at which he be- 
came quite proficient. In 1S54 he came to 
America and located in Laporte, where he 
engaged at his trade of cabinet making for 
nine years. He then removed to Indianapo- 



lis, where he was engaged in business for 
about six years. He then disposed of his 
business there, and in 1»69 came to South 
Bend, where he resided until his death. He 
engaged in the grocery and bakery business 
in the Rockstroh block, on North Main street, 
and after three years he soid out to L. Nickel, 
Jr., & Co., who have since conducted the 
business at that place. He afterward pur- 
chased an interest in the milling business with 
his brother-in-law, John C. Knoblock, and 
formed the Knoblock-Ginz Milling Company. 
Mr. Ginz was the active business manager 
of the company up to the date of his death. 
In his early life Mr. Ginz was a lover of lib- 
erty, and in 1849, when but nineteen years of 
age. he participated in the German rebellion 
of that year under the command of Franz 
Sigel. who afterward became a General in 
the United States Army during the civil war. 
The German rebellion was unsuccessful, and 
Mr. Ginz, who was a sergeant in the army, 
with a number of others, escaped to Switz- 
erland, wheie he remained until receiving a 
full pardon from the German government, a 
few months later. On coming to America 
he was an active member of the Democratic 
party, and was a strong leader in politics in 




HON. HENRY GINZ. 

St. Joseph County. In 1879 he was' elected a 
member of the State Legislature, and he 
served one term in that body with distin- 
guished ability. Mr. Ginz was a public spirit- 



102 



SOUTH BEND, 



ed man in every sense of the term, and was 
active in the promotion of the interests of this 
city. He was a member of Robert Blum Lodge 
of the Odd Fellows fraternity, and of the South 
Bend Turn-Verien. He was married in De- 
cember, 1859, to Miss Wilhelmina Meyer, and 
this most estimable lady still survives him. 
His family consisted of two sons and a daugh- 
ter, Adolph S. Ginz and Harvey Ginz, both 
of whom are engaged in responsible positions 
with the South Bend Chilled Plow Company, 
and Clara, who is the wife of Dr. L. S. La 
Pierre, the well known dentist of this city. 
During his life he was an honored and hon- 
orable citizen, and occupied a high place in 
the esteem of the people of this city. 



J. C. BOWSHER. 

Mr. Jay C. Bowsher, vice president of the 
N. P. Bowsher Company, manufacturers of feed 
mills and machinery specialties, was born in 
South Bend. April 17, 1872. He is the son of 
N. P. Bowsher, the founder of this extensive 
enterprise, and succeeded his father in the 
management of the mechanical branches of 
the business. He received his education in the 
public schools, which was extensively supple- 
mented by special studies. After finishing his 
education he at once entered the factory, and 




.1. c. BOWSHER. 

by close observation and earnest effort became 
master of its every detail. He inherited his 
inventive genius from his father, and has been 



granted a number of valuable patents, which 
are of worth and utility. He has also traveled 
extensively, and, being a close observer, has 
acquired a most intimate knowledge of the 
needs of the trade which the company supplies 
in all sections of the country. Mr. Bowsher is 
enterprising and progressive, and the influ- 
ence of his personality is largely felt in the 
advancement of the business. He was married 
in 1898 to Miss Eva Spencer, and resides at 
No. 82S Colfax avenue. 



DR. JAMES A. VARIER. 

Dr. James A, Varier is a well known and 
highly respected physician and surgeon of this 




DH. JAMES A. VARIER. 

city, and has been in practice here since 
1S93. He was born in Penn Township, St. 
Joseph County. November 2, 1852, and his 
father, Joseph Varier, was a prominent farmer. 
He attended the public schools and took a 
teacher's course in Salem College, Indiana, 
and was a school teacher in the schools of this 
county for several years. Being ambitious 
of excelling in the medical profession, he took 
a course of studies in the Indiana Medical Col- 
lege, and afterward attended the Cincinnati 
College of Medicine and Surgery, and gradu- 
ated in the class of 1876. He first commenced 
the practice of his profession at North Liberty, 
St. Joseph County, and for seventeen years 
was located in that section of the county. In 



SOUTH BEND. 



163 



1893 he removed to South Bend, and his subse- 
quent experience has fully justified his change 
of location. Dr. Varier is a progressive prac- 
titioner in the highest sense. He is the Presi- 
dent of the St. Joseph County Medical Society 
and is a member of the American and the 
Indiana State Medical Societies. He is also 
connected with the medical staff of the Ep- 
worth Hospital, and lectures before the Train- 
ing School for Nurses on therapeutics and 
dietetics. In 1892 he was elected Coroner of 
the county and served one term, declining a 
further continuance in the office. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and of the 
Commercial-Athletic Club. Dr. Varier was 
married to Miss Ella Vosburg. of this county, 
and with his two children, Charles E. and 
Eva L., resides at No. 303 South Lafayette 
street. 



streets, known as Sample's Subdivision, and 
in 1879 he went to Washington, D. C, where 
he held an important position in the Depart- 
ment of Public Printing under Mr. Defrees. 
During his later years he held a prominent 
position in the Pension Department, when he 
was stricken with paralysis, from which he 
died. Mr. Sample, during his residence in 
South Bend, was one of the most active and 
energetic citizens, and was identified with 
numerous movements in the interest of the 
city's advancement and progress. He was fa- 
miliarly and affectionately known among his 
friends as "Russ," and was a prominent factor 



A. R. SAMPLE. 

No man was better or more favorably 
known in South Bend during his long resi- 
dence here than Mr. A. R. Sample, whose 
death occurred in the City of Washington, 
D. C, on September 21, 1885. He was a 
native of Maryland, and was born in 1818. 
He was the youngest son of Captain Sample, 
who was a soldier in the war of 1S12. He 
was a native of North Carolina, but early 
removed to Maryland, where he resided until 
1819. He then removed with his family to 
Lebanon, Ohio, and after residing there a 
short time he went to Connelsville, Indiana. 
In 1835 Captain Sample came to South Bend, 
and here he lived with his son, the late Hon. 
Samuel C. Sample, who was a prominent Judge 
and the first member of Congress from this 
district. Mr. A. R. Sample was but a boy 
when his father came to South Bend, and 
after attending school he secured employment 
in the general store of Lathrop M. Taylor, 
and for a time he and the late Judge Thomas 
S. Stanfield were fellow clerks. After at- 
taining his majority he engaged in business 
with Anthony Defrees, and conducted a suc- 
cessful general store under the firm name of 
Defrees & Sample. He afterward sold out to 
George W. Matthews, and for years he traveled 
as a salesman for the dry goods and importing 
house of Halstead, Haines & Co. For several 
years he was not engaged in any business, 
but devoted his attention to his large inter- 
ests in this city. He laid out and sold a large 
tract of land north of the Lake Shore rail- 
road, and between Carroll and Fellows 




A. K. SAMPLE. 

in the community. Mr. Sample was thrice 
married, his widow being Mrs. Mary A. Clark, 
a most estimable lady, of this city, and who 
still survives him. At his death he also left 
two sons, his oldest and youngest, and of 
these the youngest, Samuel C, was living in 
Butte, Nebraska, and died there in November, 
1899, and his remains were brought to South 
Bend for burial. The oldest son, James Sam- 
ple, is still living, and is at present engaged 
in one of the departments at Washington. Mr. 
Sample was a most genial and courteous gen- 
tleman, and his death was mourned by a 
large circle of friends in this city. He was 
also an active member of the First M. E. 
Church of this city, and took a deep interest 
in its welfare and progress. 



164 



SOUTH BEND, 



JOSEPH D. OLIVER. 

Mr. Joseph D. Oliver, the ahle treasurer 
and general manager of the famous Oliver 
Chilled Plow Works, is a well known, public 




known in this community. He is a native of 
Ohio, and was born in Tuscaraugus County, 
January 4. lS-Ut. His father, Adam D. France, 
moved fiom Ohio to Laporte County, Indiana, 
in 1S53. and the son's early life was spent upon 
the farm, where he took advantage of the edu- 
cational facilities afforded by the district 
schools in the vicinity of his home. He came 
to South Bend in 1S74, and engaged in the 
hardware business with Mr. Edwin Nicar and 
Frank E. Reynolds, under the firm name of E. 
Nicar & Co. He afterward purchased the inter- 
ests of his associates and became sole propri- 
etor of the business for a time, when he 
connected himself with Mr. R. H. Murdock, 
and the firm was then changed to Murdock & 
France. Mr. France's health becoming im- 
paired, he sold out his business, and for about, 
three years retired from active commercial 
life. He then reengaged in the hardware 
business with Mr. \V. D. Gish, under the firm 
name of France & Gish, but after a short time 
his health failed and the firm disposed of the 
business to Thayer & Sibley, and he again 
temporarily retired. In 1SSS he organized, and 
was one of the incorporators, of the Dr. White- 
hall Megrimine Company, and was made secre- 
taiy of the company, which office he now 



JOSEPH ]>. OLIVER. 

spirited citizen of South Bend, who has al- 
ways been identified with every measure tend- 
ing to advance the best interests of the city. 
Mr. Oliver was born at Mishawaka. August 2, 
1850. He is the only son of James Oliver, 
one of our foremost citizens, and Susan (Doty) 
Oliver. He received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of this city, and afterward attended 
the University of Notre Dame and Greencastle 
College. He was early associated with his 
father in the great works that bears his name, 
and was an able and energetic promoter of 
the interests of this enterprise. He is a pro- 
gressive and broad minded business man, and 
has been interested in a number of public 
improvements of a valuable and enduring char- 
acter, and has won the high esteem of the 
entire community. Mr. Oliver is married, and 
with his family resides in a luxurious home 
on West Washington street. 





A. B. FRANCE. 

Mr. Abraham B. France, the secietary of the 
Dr. Whitehall Megrimine Company, has been 
identified with the commercial interests of this 
city for a quarter of a century, and is well 



A. B. KliANi E. 



holds. Mr. France is a business man of experi- 
ence and energy, and his management of the 
business department of the company has been 
marked by ability and advanced business 



SOUTH BEND, 



105 



methods. He is well known and highly es- 
teemed in the community, and is "a member of 
the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities, and 
of the Commercial-Athletic Club. Mr. France 
was married to Miss Kate Reynolds, a daugh- 
ter of the late George W. Reynolds, and his 
family consists ot two sons. He resides in a 
pleasant home at No. 345 Colfax avenue. 



ALFRED B. MILLER. 

Mr. Alfred B. Miller, founder of the South 
Bend Tribune, and for twenty years its 
editor, was one of South Bend's most gifted 
sons. He was born in this city, February C, 
1840, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Miller, 
coming here from Westchester, Pennsylvania, 
a few years before that date. He early dis- 
played qualities of mind and an energetic na- 
ture that made him a foremost journalist of 
Indiana, and a leading citizen of St. Joseph 
County. He obtained his education in the 
schools of South Bend, and devoted his leisure 
nours to studying at home. With his taste 
tor knowledge he had rare inventive talent, 
and while other boys spent their time in out 
door sports, he passed his spare hours from 
school in making engines, wagons, sieighs 
and the like in a little shop fitted with tools 
in his fathers bam. Whne a mere lad he 
made complete a box sleigh, which is still in 
use. He was a boy of sunny disposition and 
liked companions, but he could not bear to 
fritter away h.s time in p. ay. Aside from his 
mechanical genius and skill. Mr. Miller early 
developed liteiary ability of a high older. His 
lather was a practical pi inter, and he was 
much around a printing office, where he gath- 
ered inspiration and a liking fo.- the printing 
business. Before reaching his majority he 
was employed as clerk in the general stOie oi 
John W. Chess, and when the war of the re- 
bellion broke out he enlisted in the Twenty- 
first Indiana Battery, serving th.oughout the 
struggle as Second Lieutenant and Quarter- 
master. His war iecord was oi the first order, 
and he participated in many engagements with 
the Army of the West. While in the service he 
wrote for the press, not only in the line of 
regular conespondence, but in fiction and 
poetry. He wrote short stories for Harper's 
Magazine, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspa- 
per and other papers of the east. After the 
war, for several years, he was employed in 
the store of John Brownfield, and left commer- 
cial life to enter into the newspaper business. 
With his brothei -in-law, Elmer Crockett, in 



1869. he purchased a half interest in the St. 
Joseph Valley Register, the paper established 
by Hon. Schuyler Colfax. Mr. Miller assumed 
the editorship of the paper, and Mr. Crockett 
had charge of the mechanical department. In 
1872 they disposed of their interest and found- 
ed the South Bend Weekly Tribune, with Mr. 
Miller as its editor. He developed a remark- 
able talent for every kind of newspaper work, 
and labored day and night for the success of 
his paper. Mr. Miller took a great interest in 
politics, and was an aggressive and force- 
ful writer, as well as a shrewd party man- 
ager. He was a man of wonderful versatility 
and of inexhaustible resources. He was pro- 
giessive. original and diplomatic. He was 







f 



ALFRED 11. MILLER. 

equally adept in inaugurating a new idea in a 
display advertisement as he was in writing 
spicy "trifles," chronicling local happenings, 
weighty edito.ials. obituary notices, literary 
sketches or poems. He loved South Bend and 
did much to advance the city's interest. He 
enjoyed the acquaintance of nearly eveiy man, 
woman and child in the city, and was posted 
in county history fiom the time of its settle- 
ment. He was suave and polite of manner, 
modest, unselfish, considerate, and what is 
rare for a busy newspaper man. was always 
accessible and ready to chat with an old rural 
friend or city c'aller. He was a tireless worker 
and had no patience with the idler class. He 
was a great friend to young journalists, and 



166 



SOUTH BEND. 



the old soldier also had a true friend in Alf. 
Miller. His purse was always open to the call 
of distress, and he dispensed charity with a 
free hand. He was a splendid specimen of 
the thiifty citizen, broad minded in all his 
views, and possessed with a mind to do the 
right. There was widespread and sincere 
mourning in the community when, in the prime 
of life, and in the midst of his active labors, 
Mr. Miller, after a brief illness, was called 
upon to lay aside all and pass on to the higher 
life. Indiana journalism lost one of its bright- 
est ornaments, and South Bend one of its 
staunchest friends when Alf. Miller died. His 
parents died before him, and there are surviv- 
ing him his widow and son, Fred A. Miller, 
the present editor of the Tribune, and two 
sisters, Mrs. Elmer Crockett, of South Bend, 
and Mrs. J. M. Deffenbaugn, ot Seattle, Wash- 
ington. 



DR. ROBERT HARRIS. 

Dr. Robert Harris enjoys the distinction ot 
being the oldest medical piaetitioner now liv- 
ing in South Bend, and one of the most suc- 
cessful. He was born in Loraine County. Ohio 
March 14, 1823. He is the son of John Hariis. 
a successful farmer in that locality, and Eliza- 
beth (Clay) Harris. In early boyhood he at- 
tended the district schools, and afterward went 
to Oberlin College for two yea:s, and then 
taught school for five terms. He devoted him- 
self at night to the study of medicine, and 
thus laid the foundation of his ultimate suc- 
cess. He then took two courses at the Starling 
Medical College, of Columbus, Ohio, and be- 
gan the practice of medicine in 1849, in Tiffin, 
Ohio. He afterward moved to B ownell, 
Loraine County, and later joined his b.other, 
Dr. Henry L. Harris who was a prominent 
physician at Flat Rock, for a short time. In 
1852 he came to South Bend. He was a 
thorough diagnostician, we 1 giounded in every 
essential point of medical practice, and soon 
acquired a wide reputation, and a large prac- 
tice. He traveled horseback through St. Jo- 
seph and Elkhart Counties, and as far as Stark 
County, and never allowed personal comfo.t 
or convenience to interfere with the call of 
duty. At one time he had the largest prac- 
tice and traveled over a greater area of te.ri- 
tory than any other physician in this section 
of the state. For nearly fifty years he was 
in active practice, but in 1894 he relinquished 
his out door visits and confined himself en- 
tirely to office woik. He was a genial com- 



lorter and a hopeful adviser, and his cheerful 
disposition contributed largely to his success. 
Dr. Harris always took a deep interest in 
public affairs. He was a member of the City 
Council and of the Board of Health, and 
through his efforts the entire city was thor- 
oughly cleansed and placed in a highly sani- 
tary condition. He was prominently men- 




DR. ROBERT HARRfS. 

tioned for the Mayoralty, but emphatically de- 
clined the honor. Dr. Harris is still in the 
enjoyment of good health, and prescribes for 
many of his old patients. He was first mar- 
ried to Miss Sophia Bohn, who died twenty 
years ago, and his present estimable wife was 
Miss Emma Burnett, of Michigan, who was 
a popular teacher in the public schools. Dr. 
Harris resides with his wife and an only son 
in his comfortable home at No. 323 West 
Jefferson street. 



JACOB F. STUDEBAKER. 

Mr. Jacob F. Studebaker, whose deeply la- 
mented death occurred in Chicago on Decem- 
ber 17, 1887, was an honored citizen of South 
Bend, and one who was endeared by many 
ties to a host of friends. Mr. Studebaker was 
the youngest of five brothers who have done 
so much to advance the progress and indus- 
trial welfare of this city, and during his life 
was a most important factor in the great man- 



SOUTH BEND 



167 



ufacturing company whose fame extends 
throughout the world. He was born in Ash- 
land County, Ohio, May 26, 1844. His father, 
John Studebaker, was a well known black- 
smith and wagon builder, who had removed 
from near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and lo- 
cated in Ohio. In 1852 the family removed to 
South Bend, and here the young man attended 
the old seminary, which was located on the 
site where the new high school now stands, 
and afterward was a student at Notre Dame 
University for two terms. Even in those early 
days Mr. Studebaker evinced those strong and 
successful commercial traits which afterward 
contributed so largely to the growth and de- 
velopment of the interests of the Studebaker 




JACOB F. STUDEIiAKEK. 

Bros. Manufacturing Company, with which he 
was prominently identified. His brothers, Mr. 
Clem Studebaker, Mr. J. M. Studebaker and 
Mr. Peter E. Studebaker, fully appreciated his 
value to the company and acknowledged with 
pride his many admirable qualities. He was 
the manager of the carriage department of the 
company, and it was mainly through his prac- 
tical knowledge and keen business foresight 
that this branch of the company has reached 
its present monumental proportions. Mr. 
Studebaker was always noted for his great 
love of horses, and was the owner of many of 
the most valuable animals in the country. He 
organized the great Percheron Horse Com- 



pany, of Colorado, which impoited some of the 
finest specimens of the Fercherons ever 
brought to America, and which engaged ex- 
censively in the breeding of this class of ani- 
mals. As a business man he possessed most 
excellent judgment, and was most energetic 
and progressive, and remarKably just and suc- 
cessful in his dealings with the employes of 
the company. He was always noted for his 
generosity and public spirit, and was fore- 
most in every movement that tended to ad- 
vance the best interests of the community. He 
was largeiy interested in the organization of 
the Agricultural Association, and was identi- 
fied with a number of public enterprises. In 
1864 Mr. Studebaker was married to Miss Har- 
riet Chord, a daughter of Mr. Samuel Chord, 
a well known and prominent citizen of South 
Bend. His family consists of two accomplished 
daughters. Mrs. Studebaker is a most estima- 
ble lady, and the home Hie of the deceased 
was most attractive and enjoyable. Through 
the influence or Mrs. Studebaker he became 
an active member of the Baptist church, and 
contributed largely to its maintenance and 
advancement. His beautiful and commodious 
residence is located at Sunnyside, and here 
his widow and daughter now reside. His 
death was a loss to the community, the City 
of South Bend, and to many friends in various 
sections of the country. No more appropriate 
tribute to his memory could have been ut- 
tered than the words selected by the Rev. 
G. E. Farr at the funeral obsequies: "Know 
ye not that there is a prince and a great man 
fallen." 



P. J. LEWIS MEYER. 

Among the leading attorneys practicing at 
the bar of St. Joseph County. Mr. F. J. Lewis 
Meyer justly takes high rank and legitimate 
prominence. Mr. Meyer is a native of Ontario, 
Canada, and was born November 2, 1860. His 
father was the Rev. F. F. Meyer, a leading 
member of the Evangelical Association, who 
was well known in this city, and whose la- 
mented death occurred in 1894. Mr. Meyer's 
early education was acquired in the vicinity 
of his home, and when fourteen years of age 
he removed with his parents to Michigan. At 
sixteen he taught school in that state, and in 
1879 he came to South Bend, which he has 
since made his home. He taught in the public 
schools for eight years, during the last three 
of which he was p.incipal of the Lafayette 
school, and was recognized as an able and 



16S 



SOUTH BEND 



advanced instructor. He afterward attended 
the Law Department o£ the Northwestern Uni- 
versity of Illinois, and graduated from that 
institution in L889. He was admitted to the 




F. J. LEWIS MEYER. 

bar, and since that time has been successfully 
engaged in the practice of his p.ofessioh in 
this city. He is a general practitioner of 
ability, and makes a specialty of damage suits, 
in which he has won deserved distinction. He 
was the attorney in the suit of Bennie Turner 
vs. the City of South Bund, and was awarded 
the largest damages ever given in Northern 
Indiana, and also acted for the plaintitf in the 
suit of Giede vs. the South Bend Chilled Plow 
Company, in which he was also successful. 
He has won a high reputation in criminal cases 
of piominence, both for the prosecution and 
defense, but of late years has relinquished 
his criminal practice to a great extent. He is 
the local attorney for the Indiana, Illinois and 
Iowa Railway, and general counsel for the 
Buff & Blue Oolitic Stone Company, and the 
Crafton Stone Company, whose quarries are 
located in the Bedford District, in Morgan 
County. Mi. Meyer is an able attorney, a legal 
adviser of reliability and well versed in the 
law. He is well known and esteemed in the 
community, and at one time was Republican 
candidate for Mayor of the city. Mr. Meyer 
was married to Miss Mary Rough, a native ot 
Michigan, and with his estimable wife and 
child resides at No. -117 West Navarre street. 



ALBERT H. KELLEY. 

Mr. Albert H. Kelley, president of the South 
Bend Kernedy Company, whose handsome office 
building and laboratory is located at No. 220 
West Water street, is a native of Ohio, and was 
born in Starke County. January 8, 1S52. His 
father, Richard Kelley, was a well known con- 
tractor in that locality. The young man re- 
ceived his eaily education in the public schools 
in this locality, and when he was fifteen years 
of age his parents came to South Bend, and 
he attended the pub'ic schools here. He was 
then engaged as collection clerk in the First 
National Bank, where he remained for eight 
years, and afterward spent one year in the 
mining business at Leadville, Col. On his 
return he was engaged as assistant cashier 
in the office of the Studebaker Bios. Manufac- 
turing Company, where he remained twelve 
years. In 1892 he resigned his position and 
took an active interest in the business of the 
South Bend Remedy Company, in which he had 
been financially interested for several years 
previous. This company prepares the cele- 
brated female remedy, "Magnolia Blossom." 
which has attained a woi Id-wide reputation. 
They also manufacture the "Royal Tea," and 
a number of other excellent family remedies 
whose virtues are known and highly appreci- 




ATJ8ERT II. KELLEY. 

ated both in America and Europe. The com- 
pany was established m 1S8H, and occupies 
a handsome and substantial brick and stone 
building of ornate design and extensive pro- 



SOUTH BEND 



10!) 



portions, all of which is devoted to the busi- 
ness of the company and the preparation of 
their vaiious remedies. From its inception 
the company has conducted the business on 
a legitimate and progressive basis, and its 
present success and wide reputation is due 
to the excellence and efficacy of their prepara- 
tions and to their strict methods of conducting 
business. Mr. A. H. Kelley, the president, is 
ably assisted by his son, R. Lyle Kelley, who 
is secretaiy o£ the company, and by Dr. C. H. 
Frank, a physician of known and recognized 
medical reputation, who is in charge of the 
consulting department. The company trans- 
acts a strictly mail order business, and their 
trade extends throughout the United States 
and Canada, and many European cities. Mr. 
Kelley is an active and energetic business man 
in the highest sense and has most ably con- 
ducted the laige and increasing business of 
the company, xie is well known in this com- 
munity and is a member ot the Indiana and 
Commercial-Athletic Clubs. He was married 
to Miss Mary E. Deming, daughter of Mr. 
Dwight Deming, who was a prominent citizen 
of South Bend, and with his family, consisting 
of a son and daughter, resides in a handsome 
home at the corner of Colfax avenue and 
North Taylor street. 



HON. DAVID K. LEEPER. 

In the death of Hon. David R. Leeper, which 
occurred in this city November 2t, 1900, South 
Bend lost one of its Oldest native born citizens 
and prominent men, who had been in public 
life tor nearly half a century. He was boin 
in a rude log cabin near this city January 12, 
1832, and had been identitied with the growth 
and progress ot South Bend from infancy. 
His father was Samuel Leeper, who early in 
life removed from his home in Washington 
County, Pennsylvania, to Starke County, Ohio, 
and atteiward to Montgomery County, in that 
state. His mother was Elizabeth Roher, who 
also resided in Montgomery County. In 1828 
his father first came to St. Joseph County. 
Indiana, in company with his father-in-iaw, 
Joseph Rohrer, but did not remain. He re- 
turned, however, in 1830, and pitched his tent 
on the bank of McCartney creek, west of the 
present city, where the Michigan road crosses 
the creek, while the surrounding country was 
the hunting ground and the habitation of the 
Indians. His first shelter was the cover of 
his wagon, stretched upon upright poles, and 
later he erected a rude log cabin as a dwelling 
for his family. It was in this cabin that David 



Rohrer Leeper was born, but shortly after- 
ward his parents removed to a large tract of 
timber land near Sumption Prairie. His father 
was deeply interested in the cause of public 
education, and several of the unoccupied houses 
he transformed into school houses, the first 
being erected on his own farm. On this farm 
his mother and three children died, the mother 
in 1812, but his lather lived until 1886, when 
he died suddenly while on the train returning 
fiom California. Young Leeper remained 
upon the farm until he was seventeen, attend- 
ing the public schools, and later studying 
under Professors Wright and Cogswell in South 
Bend. While a student at the old seminary, 
which stood on the site of the present high 
school, the gold excitement bioke out in Cali- 




HON. DAVIO li. LEEPER. 

tornia, and he was attacked with the fever. 
He importuned his father to fit him out for 
a pilgrimage to the El Dorado, and with several 
young friends and two ox teams they started 
on their journey to the Pacific coast on Febru- 
ary 22, 1849. Their way was beset with perils, 
adventuies and vicissitudes. They swam the 
oxen across small streams, dragged their wag- 
on, ferried the Mississippi river at Burlington, 
Iowa, and after crossing the Missouri traveled 
over a desert country, without a single habita- 
tion save a few mud huts at Foits Kearney 
and Laramie, until they reached the Sacra- 
mento Valley, a distance of nearly 2,000 miles. 



170 



SOUTH BEND 



They finally reached the gold fields on October 
11, being seven months and sixteen days on 
the journey. After a short stay he set out 
for Sacramento City, which he reached penni- 
less and alone, having become separated from 
his companions, and with only his clothes 
and blanket. Here he went to work making 
rough board coffins for the burial of dead 
miners, who were laid to rest clad in their 
red shirts and blue overalls. From there he 
wandered to near Coloma, where gold was 
first discovered by Marshall, and then to Hang- 
town, where he remained a few months, go- 
ing north to Trinity. Here he mined in the 
river, and at Weaverville, until the next fail, 
braving every danger from the hostile Digger 
Indians, and was wounded by an arrow in 
the left leg, while many of his party were 
killed. He then made his way to Humboldt 
Bay, the chief lumbering section in that state, 
and was the first to engage in logging at that 
point. He remained there until May, 1S54, 
when he returned by tne way of Nicaragua 
and Greytown, and by steamer to New York. 
He was about twenty-two years old when he 
reached home, and he again attended school 
at the Mishawaka Institute, of which Pro- 
fessor C. Fitz Roy Bellows was the principal. 
When the Republican party was first oigan- 
ized he was a zealous partisan, and took an 
active part in political affairs. In 1864 he 
again went west to Montana, where he re- 
mained until 1868, engaged in mining and 
freighting, with headquarters at Helena and 
Virginia City. In 1867 he was nominated for 
the Assembly at Helena, but was defeated, al- 
though he ran highest on the ticket. In 1872, 
after his return home, he left the party and 
was nominated by the Liberals and Democrats 
for the Legislature, but declined. He was 
again nominated in 1874, and was elected, and 
re-elected in 1S77, and served on many of the 
most important committees. In 187S he was 
elected to the State Senate, for St. Joseph and 
Starke Counties, and here, too, he distinguished 
himself in important committee work. He was 
the father of the game laws, and advocated 
the erection of the new State House, and 
many measures for the better care of the poor 
and insane. In 1882 he was urged to become 
a candidate for Congress, and also to stand for 
the United States Senate, but declining both 
honors, was nominated for County Auditor 
and was defeated, with his entire ticket. He 
then retired for a time from active politics 
and devoted himself to travel, study and lit- 
erary woik, but in 1892 he was nominated for 



Mayor of South Bend, and reluctantly accept- 
ing, was elected, although only he and one 
other were elected on his ticket. After serv- 
ing his term he retired to private life, except 
holding the office of Police Commissioner, to 
which he was appointed by the late Governor 
Matthews, and again appointed by Governor 
Mount in January, 1899, which office he held 
when he died. Mr. Leeper was a public spirit- 
ed citizen of the highest type, and won and 
held the esteem of the entire community. He 
was vice president of the South Bend National 
Bank at the time of his death. Mr. Leeper 
was a man of fine appearance, large and impos- 
ing stature and of dignified bearing and courte- 
ous manners. He was a man of fine culture 
and liteiary ability, and a most prolific writer 
of local history. He was the author of two 
valuable works. "The American Idea" and 
"The Argonauts of '49," both of which are 
well known and greatly admired. He was not 
married, and his surviving relatives are Mrs. 
Daniel Greene, a sister, and a half brother. 
Mr. Samuel Leeper, a prominent and esteemed 
business man of this city. 



DR. FRED P. EASTMAN. 

Dr. Fred. P. Eastman, one of the leading 
physicians and surgeons of South Bend, is a 




DR. FRED P. EASTMAN. 

native of Seneca Falls, New York. He was 
born October 3, 1860, and his father, Charles 
W. Eastman, was a prominent contractor and 



SOUTH BEND. 



171 



builder in that section of the country. He 
was educated in the public and high schools 
at Seneca Falls, and afterward attended the 
Detroit College of Medicine, at Detroit, Michi- 
gan, and graduated from that institution in 
1S92. He commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession in Detroit, and after a short term at 
Seneca Falls he came to this city in 1893, 
and has been in successful practice as a 
physician and surgeon since that time. Dr. 
Eastman also attended a post-graduate course 
at the New York Polyclinic in 1895. He is 
the Medical Examiner of the Security Life 
Insurance Company of Binghamton, N. Y.; 
the Reserve Loan Life of Indianapolis, and 
the Security Mutual Life of Newark, N. J. He 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
United Workmen, and the Knights of the 
Maccabees, and is the Supreme Examiner for 
the Knights and Ladies of Columbia. Dr 
Eastman is also a member of the American 
Medical Association, and of the Indiana State 
and St. Joseph County Medical Societies. He 
is a member of the medical staff of the Ep- 
worth and St. Joseph Hospitals, and lectures 
before the Training School lor Nurses on 
"Diseases of Children," on which subject he is 
an acknowledged authoiity. He is also treas- 
urer of the Pension Board of the United States 
tor this district. Dr. Eastman was married 
to Miss Lulu Andrews, of Seneca County, N. 
Y., and resides at No. 330 South Main street. 



tion he served in the years 1892 and 1893. Dur- 
ing his term as City Attorney Mr. Cunning- 
ham was deeply interested in the subject of 
permanent street improvements, and he was 
the author of a bill, which became a law, pro- 



OLIVER M. CUNNINGHAM. 

Mr. Oliver M. Cunningham, the present City 
Attorney of South Bend, is a lawyer of high 
standing at the bar, and of acKnowledged 
ability. He was born at Larwill, Whitley Coun- 
ty, Ind., July 5, 1861. His father, Jonathan 
Cunningham, was a well-known farmer in that 
section of the country. Mr. Cunningham re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools 
of St. Joseph County, and afterward attended 
the State Normal School at Valparaiso. He 
then became a student at the University of 
Michigan, and graduated from the Law De- 
partment in the class of 1S88. After his gradu- 
ation he went to California, and was admitted 
to the bar at Los Angeles, where he practiced 
law for two years. In 1S90 he returned to 
South Bend, and at once established himself 
in business. He was elected City Attorney 
in 1891, and after ably serving in that office 
for more than a year, he resigned to accept 
the office of States Attorney, in which posi- 




OLIVER M. CUNNINGHAM. 

viding that all sewer pipes and other under- 
ground impiovements should be fully com- 
pleted before the streets were paved, thus 
securing them from being lorn up and prac- 
tically destroyed after they had been properly 
paved. The act was contested in the courts, 
but Mr. Cunningham succeeded in obtaining 
a decision sustaining the law in its entirety. 
Mr. Cunningham is recognized as one of the 
leading attorneys of this city, and as City 
Attorney, which office he now holds, he has 
ever been active in maintaining the legal 
rights of the city. His connection with the 
Reynolds City Hall Case is well remembered, 
and the Supreme Court of the state, on appeal, 
rendered a decision in favor of the city. Mr. 
Cunningham is especially well grounded in 
municipal law, and at all times has been a 
safe counselor to the Mayor and the City 
Council. He is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and of South Bend Commandery, K. T., 
and of the Knights of Pythias. He was mar- 
ried to Miss May Holler, youngest daughter of 
Senator Holler, of St. Joseph County, and re- 
sides at No. 1215 West Washington street. 



172 



SOUTH BEND. 



FRED W. KELLER. 

Mr. Fred W. Keller, the present Surveyor 
of St. Joseph County, is a civil engineer of 
excellent training and experience, and unques- 
tioned ability in his profession. He was born 




LOUIS A. HULL. 

When South Bend secures the services of a 
valuable official he is generally assured of 
the confidence of the public, and of a continu- 
ance in office, if he desires to lemain in the 
public service. This fact is particularly exem- 
plified in the case of Mr. Louis A. Hull, the 
popular and efficient City Clerk of South Bend, 
who has continuously occupied his present of- 
fice since 1892. Mr. Hull is a native of New 
York State, and was born in Troy, September 
3, 1842. His father, Adolph Hull, was promi- 
nently engaged in the shoe business at that 
time. At thirteen yeais of age, and while he 
was a student in the high school at Troy, young 
Hull came to South Bend with his parents. He 
attended the public schools in this city, and 
was afterward engaged in the office of A. 
Coquillard, the famous wagon maker, as a 
bookkeeper. On the breaking out of the war of 
the rebellion the young man enlisted in the 
Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers, but was after- 
waid transferred to the Quartermaster's De- 
partment at Nashville, Tenn., where he rose 
to the position of chief clerk. He remained in 
the service until the close of the war when 
he returned to South Bend and reentered the 



FRED W. KELI.EU. 



in German Township, this county, September 
16, 1872, and his father, George Keller, was 
a successful and prosperous farmer in that 
locality. During the years 1892, 1893 and 1894 
young Keder attended the University of Mich- 
igan, at Ann Aibor, and studied surveying 
during the vacation periods. He evinced 

marked ability in this vocation, and in 1894 
he came to South Bend and was at once en- 
gaged in the office of the City Engineer, which 
position he filled to the satisfaction of all. In 
1898 he was elected County Surveyor, and so 
well has he performed the duties of this office 
that he was renominated unanimously by his 
party and was re-elected in November, 1900. 
Mr. Ke.ler is a practical surveyor in a most 
thorough sense, and can always be relied upon 
for careful and accurate service. He was 
engaged by the Riverview Cemetery Company 
to lay out its handsome grounds, and has pei- 
formed this work most skillfully and well. 
.Mr. Keller was married to Miss Edith Wool- 
man, of this city, and with an only son resides 
in a handsome home at No. 320 Navarre street. 




office of A. Coquillard. He remained with this 
establishment for a period of twenty-two years. 
In lSTii-1877 Mr. Hull served in the City Council 
as Alderman from the Fourth Ward. In 1892 



SOUTH BEND 



173 



tie was elected City Clerk, and was reelected 
in 1894 and 189S. He is an able and consci- 
entious official, and enjoys the confidence and 
respect of all who know him. Mr. Hull was 
married to Miss Lydia Duck, of South Bend, 
and has two children, a son and a daughter. 
His son, Harvey L. Hull, is Deputy Clerk and 
vies with his father in the popularity of the 
community. Mr. Hull is a member of Auten 
Post. No. 8, G. A. R., and served one term as 
adjutant of that organization. He resides in 
a commodious home at No. 516 East Colfax 
avenue, and his later years are brightened by 
his care and affection for his interesting 
grandchild. 



COL. ALFRED B. WADE. 

Col. Alfred B. Wade, whose sad and sud- 
den death by drowning in the Kankakee river, 
near Crum's Point, occurred February 27, 1S77. 
was in every sense a model man and an ideal 
citizen, a heroic soldier and an honored offi- 
cial. Col. Wade was a native of South Bend, 
and was born in this town on December 28, 
1839. He was the son of the late Judge 
Robert Wade, who died when he was quite 
young, and his mother afterward became the 
second wife of the late Horatio Chapin. He 
attended the "Old Seminary," on Washington 
street, and early developed a talent for ar- 
tistic drawing and lettering, and this led him 
to take up the marble cutting business, which 
he followed but a few years. He then went 
to Pike's Peak, but soon returned and began 
to study law with the late Judge Stanfield. 
When the war of the rebellion occurred he 
was among the first to enlist, and joined the 
Ninth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers. Later, 
when the Seventy-third Regiment was oigan- 
ized here, he was commissioned as Adjutant. 
He was in the engagements at Lexington, in 
the pursuit of General Bragg to Wildcat, the 
battle at Gallatin, Tennessee, and in the bat- 
tle of Stone river, where his regiment was the 
first to cross under fire of the enemy. On 
December 31, 1862, the regiment saved the 
day by reinforcing the shattered right wing 
of the army, and combating two full brigades, 
checked the advance, at the loss of nearly 
one-third of those engaged. The regiment 
was complimented by General Rosecians for 
its bravery on this occasion. When the In- 
dependent Brigade was formed, the Seventy- 
third was made a part of it, and engaged 
in a terrific battle with 4,000 rebel cavalry, 
under General Fori est and General Roddy. 
On May 2 the regiment bore the brunt of the 



battle at Blount's farm, and Colonel Hatha- 
way was killed. On the following day the 
brigade, out of ammunition, exhausted by hard 
fighting and long marches, and surrounded 
by a vastly superior force, surrendered, and 
Adjutant Wade, with the rest of the officers, 
was taken as prisoner to Libby Prison. For 
one year he suffeied untold hardships, and the 
sufferings he endured left their impress upon 
his after life. He was finally exchanged, was 
promoted Major and assigned to command his 
old regiment at Nashville. Here the regi- 
ment saw much fighting and many times was 
complemented by General Granger for its 
bravery, and Major Wade was made Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. In the latter part of 1 864 




COL. ALFUED B. WADE. 

Colonel Wade made a masterly defense of 
Athens, Alabama, against a large body of 
rebels under General Buford. and compelled 
their retreat with great loss. He was then 
promoted to the Colonelcy of the regiment 
and served until the end of the war. Colonel 
Wade then went to Ann Arbor, and after 
graduating opened a law office here, and was 
in successful practice until 1868, when Gen- 
eral Grant appointed him Postmaster, and he 
was i-eappointed in 1872. While in that office 
he did much toward simplifying the postal 
methods. He was an able official and in his 
public and private life won the love and es- 
teem of the entire community. His friend- 



174 



SOUTH BEND. 



ships were lasting and his enmities of short 
life, and he was a man of unbounded gener- 
osity. He was a member of Crusader's 
Lodge. K. of P.; of South Bend Lodge. 294, 
F. & A. M ; of South Bend Commandery, 
K. T., and of the Audobon Club. In 1865 
Colonel Wade was married to Miss Jennie 
Bond, a most accomplished lady, from Niles, 
Michigan, who survives him. They had four 
children, of whom two are deceased. 



DR. EDWIN R. DEAN. 

Dr. Edwin R. Dean, although but recently a 
medical practitioner in South Bend, already 
ranks high in his bono; able profession. He is 



and giving a bond of $150,000.00 for the faith- 
ful performance of his duties. He first com- 
menced the practice of medicine at Mount 
Sterling, remaining there nine years, and was 
president of the Montgomery County Medical 
Society when he left there to locate in South 
Bend. Dr. Dean is a member of the medical 
staff of the Epworth Hospital, and the Ameri- 
can and St. Joseph County Medical Societies. 
He is also the Medical Examiner of the Securi- 
ty Life Insurance Company of Indiana, and at 
Mount Sterling was examiner for the New 
York Life and Equitable Life Insurance Com- 
panies. He was married to Miss Emma Dunn, 
of South Bend, whom he met while she was 
attending school at Louisville, Ky., and with 
his family resides at No. 323 West Wayne 
street. His office is located in the handsome 
new Dean building, on South Lafayette street. 




DR. E. R. DEAN. 

a native of Kentucky, and was born at Mount 
Sterling, in that state. August 27. 1865. His 
father, Ellis Dean, was for years a prominent 
official in that city. The son was educated at 
Harris Institute, at Mount Sterling, and took 
a literary course at Georgetown College, Ken- 
tucky, graduating with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in 1SS8. He received his medical 
education at Jefferson Medical College, Phila- 
deplhia. la., and graduated in the class of 1900. 
As an evidence of his early ability, at the age 
of thirteen years he was appointed Deputy 
Tax Collector of Montgomery County. Ken- 
tucky, and held that office for eight successive 
years, serving under three different officials, 



EDWARD R. VANDERHOOF. 

Mr. Edward R. Vanderhoof, druggist, was 
born in Louisville, Stark County, Ohio, October 
21, 1S53. His father, Aaron Vanderhoof, was 
an early resident of South Bend, and for years 
was engaged by the Studebaker Bros, and the 
Oliver Plow Works in a clerical capacity, and 
afterward engaged in the grocery business on 
his own account. His ancestors were originally 




EDWARD R. VANDERHOOF 

from Holland, and the sturdy business habits 
developed by their ancestors are distinctly 



SOUTH BEND 



175 



traceable to their origin, although the Vander- 
hoofs were eaily settlers in America and 
largely interested in farming in Ohio. Mr. E. 
R. Vanderhoof passed his early days in the city 
of his birth, and came to this city when quite 
a boy, and was educated in the public and 
parochial schools, and then served for over 
ten years in the drug business as a clerk. 
After this he engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
and in 1887 returned to South Bend and estab- 
lished himself in the drug business. He was 
one of the originators of the Vanderhoof & 
Co. laboratory, whose medicines have acquired 
a reputation both in this country and Europe. 
He is justly popular and his present store, 
located at No. 216 West Washington street, 
is most attractive and supplied with every 
article known to the modern pharmacist. Mr. 
Vanderhoof was married in 1880 to Miss Mary 
A. Summers, and with his family resides at 
447 West Water Street. 



WILLIAM H. MACK. 

Mr. William H. Mack, secretary, treasurer 
and general manager of the Indiana Anchor 
Fence Company, is well known in this city and 
has been connected with several important lo- 



cashier for the Studebaker Bros. Manufactur- 
ing Company, and is still a stockholder in the 
corporation. Mr. Mack was educated in the 
public schools here. He was for years con- 
nected with the firm of Cushing & Co., and 
afterward engaged in the drug business in 
Galesburg. Illinois, and Atchison, Kansas. 
Later he was employed by the South Bend 
Toy Company, as bookkeeper for one year, 
and in 1884 was appointed Deputy Postmaster 
of South Bend, under the first administration 
of President Cleveland. For two years after 
leaving the postofflce he was connected with 
the collection department of the Studebaker 
Bros. Manufacturing Company, and for ten 
years was interested in the A. C. Staley Manu- 
facturing Company, of this city, and was the 
secretary of the company. When the Indiana 
Anchor Fence Company was organized, in Oc- 
tober, 1899, Mr. Mack was made the secretary 
and treasurer of the company, and the general 
manager of the business, and now has charge 
of the works of that concern at Nos. 117-119 
South Lafayette street. Mr. Mack is an able 
and energetic business man, and gives his per- 
sonal attention to all the details of the exten- 
sive business of the company. He is a genial 
gentleman, and well known in commercial and 
manufacturing circles, and is a member of the 
Commercial-Athletic Club. He was married to 
Miss Eva Staley, daughter of A. C. Staley, and 
resides at No. 518 North Main street. 




WILLIAM H. MACK. 

cal enterprises. He is a native of South Bend, 
and was born April 1, 1855. His father, Wil- 
liam Mack, now retired, was at one time a 
prominent contractor, and for thirty years was 



PROF. BENJAMIN WILCOX. 
When the sad news was received in this city 
that Prof. Benjamin Wilcox, the beloved pre- 
ceptor of the high school, had died at LeRoy, 
New York, on August 16, 1875, the entire 
community mourned the loss of a true friend, 
a splendid citizen and one of the greatest 
instructors our school system had ever known. 
Prof. Wilcox was a native of Connecticut, 
and was born at Cromwell, May 18, 1816. 
Until he was sixteen years of age he at- 
tended the schools in the vicinity of his home 
and assisted his father on the farm. He then 
engaged himself as a teacher, and later be- 
came a student at Williams College, from 
which famous institution he graduated in 1841, 
at the age of twenty-five years. He had an 
early inclination for the study and practice 
of medicine, but finally decided to adopt the 
calling of a teacher as his life work. After years 
proved the wisdom of this choice and brought 
fame and honor to the most progressive in- 
structor of our western schools in his day. 
Mr. Wilcox began teaching at Yates, New 
York, shortly after his graduation, and was 



176 



SOUTH BEND. 



then engaged at Wilson. New York, for about 
eleven years. He then accepted a position in 
Wisconsin, but in 1S64 he was chosen to take 
charge of the high school at Valpaiaiso, Indi- 














PROF. BENJAMIN WILCOX. 

ana, which position he accepted, and was 
engaged there until 1S70, when the Board of 
Education of South Bend induced him to come 
to this city and assume the preceptorship 
of the high school, which he most admirably 
filled until his death. Prof. Wilcox was the 
ideal instructor, and his earnest and ener- 
getic personality and methods commanded 
that most perfect discipline geneiated by the 
love and respect of the pupil for the master. 
Never was a teacher more popular with his 
pupils, and perhaps never before was there 
such perfect accord in the school 100m, such 
energetic emulation to excel, and such es- 
teem for the guiding spirit of the studies. 
Prof. Wilcox took a deep personal interest in 
his scholars, and kept a record of their course 
in school and of their after achievements, 
and this record, which embraced the period 
of thirty-four years of active professional 
teaching, contained the names of over nine 
thousand pupils who had come under his care 
and tutelary charge. He was alike endeared 
to scholars and their parents, and the gen- 
eral sorrow at his death was profound and 
widespread. His was a quiet and impressive 
dignity, which won the heaits and command- 
ed the respect of all, and all felt the be- 



reavement of his demise. His remains were 
brought to South Bend for burial, and the 
funeral was attended by the scholars and 
their teachers, and by a large concourse of 
son owing friends. Prof. Wilcox was twice 
married, his first wife being Miss Harriet M. 
Paimelee, of Connecticut. He left a widow, 
Mrs. Carrie E. Wilcox, to survive him. and 
this estimable lady, with her daughter, Grace 
S. Wilcox, who is a valued teacher in the high 
school to-day, now reside together in this city 
at No. 121 South Chapin street. The other 
children were Edward M. Wolcox, Willis P. 
Wilcox and Helen M., a daughter. 



ALVA WELLS. 



Mr. Alva Wells, one of South Bend's most 
respected citizens, a pioneer resident, and for 
many years a successful business man, is a 
native of New York, and was born in Onon- 
daga County, near the City of Syracuse, Octo- 
ber 3, 1826. His father was Benjamin Wells, 
a millwright, and his mother Sylvia (Salmon) 
Wells. Mr. Wells relates many interesting 
reminiscences of his early life, and recalls 
when he was six years of age, with Mr. Joseph 
H. Hibberd, an honored citizen here, who at 





ALVA WELLS, 

that time was a neighbor, ran away to Syra- 
cure and saw the first railroad train that ever 
ran. This was in 1S35. Until he was four- 
teen years of age he lived on the place where 



SOUTH BEND 



177 



he was born, and in 1840 removed to Avoca, 
Steuben County, New York. He learned the 
use of tools in his father's shop, and when 
he was sixteen years of age took a contract 
to build a house, and then engaged in the 
contracting business. He built the Erie rail- 
way depot at Avoca, and then took a contract 
to build sixteen threshing machines, and went 
into a machine shop and finished the iron 
woik for them. He was two years superin- 
tendent of the machine shop, and then went 
to Bath, New York, and engaged in the con- 
tracting and building business. The panic 
of 1857 saw Mr. Wells deeply in debt, but he 
went bravely to work and paid every dollar, 
and in 1867 came to South Bend, where he 
has since resided. He worked at making tables 
two years, and in 1869 took up contacting 
and built the First Methodist Church in this 
city. For four years he was engaged as a pat- 
tern maker at Studebaker's. In 1880 he went 
into the pattern business for himself in a 
shop at the foot of Washington street. After 
nine years he removed to a shop across the 
race, and with his son, Elmer E. Wells, con- 
tinued the business under the style of A. Wei s 
& Son. In 1895, after an active and honored 
life, he retired from business. He was married 
in 1847 to Miss Maryett Smith, a native of 
Oswego County, New York, who died in 1895. 
In 1897 be was married to Mrs. Mary F. Scott 
Pierce, and with his estimable wife resides 
at No. 738 South Michigan street. 



CAPTAIN EDWIN NICAR. 

Captain Edwin Nicar is well known in com- 
mercial circles of South Bend, and for the past 
twenty-one years has been connected with the 
Oliver Chilled Plow Woiks, and is in charge 
of the advertising and foreign departments. 
Mr. Nicar was born in Mishawaka, and is the 
son of Robert B. Nicar, formerly a prominent 
hardware merchant in this city, and Mary E. 
(Llewellyn) Nicar. The father of Captain 
Nicar was Treasurer of St. Joseph County for 
six years, and was highly esteemed in the 
community. Captain Nicar received his early 
education in the public schools of this city, 
and afterward entered the hardware store of 
his father. When the civil war broke out 
young Nicar was one of the first to respond to 
President Lincoln's call for volunteers, and he 
enlisted in the Fifteenth Regiment, Indiana 
Infantry, and was made sergeant of Company 
B. He carried a musket for six months, when 



he was promoted to a second lieutenancy, was 
afterward first lieutenant and adjutant, and 
was then commissioned as captain of Company 
H. He went through the campaign of 1861 
in West Virginia with the army of that name. 
Later his regiment was ordered to Louisville, 
Ky., and formed part of the Army of the Ohio, 
under General Buell. He participated in the 
battle of Shiloh, and his regiment formed part 
of the force that came to the assistance of 
General Grant at that time. He was at the 
siege of Corinth, and took part in the cam- 
paigns in Northern Alabama and Mississippi. 
He also participated in all of the battles in 




CAPTAIN EDWIN NICAR. 

which the Army of the Cumberland was en- 
gaged, and was in the battles of Stone's River, 
the siege of Chattanooga, the storming of Mis- 
sionary Ridge, and the various engagements 
and military operations of the Atlanta cam- 
paign. Captain Nicar was wounded at the 
battle of Stone's River, but soon recovered, 
not having left his command. He was mus- 
tered out on the completion of his term of 
service, and returning to South Bend, he en- 
gaged again in the hardware business, in 
which he continued for eleven years. He served 
as Clerk of the Circuit Court for four years, 
and in 1879 he was engaged at the Oliver 
Chilled Plow Works, where he has made an 
honorable record for the past twenty-one 
years. Captain Nicar is a prominent member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, and for 



178 



SOUTH BEND. 



four years he was commander of Auten Post, 
No. S, of South Bend. He was also elected 
Department Commander in 1884 for the State 
of Indiana, and won the econiums of his com- 
rades in this state. Captain Nicar married 
Miss Cora A. Beckwith, a resident of Michi- 
gan, and his family consists of two sons. He 
resides at No. 216 Noith Lafayette street. 



EDWARD B. REYNOLDS. 

Mr. Edward B. Reynolds, the vice president 
of the First National Bank of South Bend, is 



r 




EDWARD I!. REYNOLDS. 

d. native of this city and enjoys the esteem of 
the community. He was horn June 28, 1859. 
His father was Mr. Ethan S. Reynolds, who 
was an active business man in this city for 
many years, but now deceased, and his mother 
was Janette (Briggs) Reynolds, who is still 
living and resides in the old family homestead 
at No. 225 West Washington street. Mr. 
Reynolds leceived his education in the public 
and high schools of this city, and on the 
completion of his studies he entered into active 
business in the paper mill conducted by h's 
father. He remained with this establishment 
for about fifteen years, when he retired from 
active business life. His father was one of 
the organizers of the bank, in which he was a 
stockholder, diiector and vice president until 
his death, when he was succeeded by his son, 
Mr. Edward B. Reynolds. Mr. Reynolds is a 



careful business man and a financier of recog- 
nized ability, and his standing in the commun- 
ity is of the highest. He is fond of travel and 
observation, and has made extended trips to 
all sections of the United States, Mexico and 
Alaska, and has traveled over the continent 
of Europe, and visited Egypt, Jerusalem, Con- 
stantinople and other Oriental cities, tiaveling 
through the whole of Japan and visiting the 
larger cities of China. His last journey was 
an interesting trip to the Klondike region dur- 
ing last summer, which has furnished him 
with many stirring reminiscences of the frigid 
field of the modem gold seekers. Mr. Reynolds 
also attended the Bankers' Convention at 
Richmond, Va.. in October, as a financial repre- 
sentative of South Bend. He is a member of 
the Indiana and Country Clubs, and is promi- 
nent in fraternal circles. In March, 1901. 
Mayor Colfax appointed Mr. Reynolds a mem- 
ber of the Board of Public Works, under the 
new city charter. 



D. D. BOWSHER. 

Mr. Delevan D. Bowsher. president and 
treasurer of the N. P. Bowsher Company, man- 
ufacturers of feed mills and machine special- 
ties, is a worthy successor of his honored 




D. D. BOWSHER. 

father in the management of the extensive 
business of the company. Mr. Bowsher was 
born in Ligonier, Ind., March 26, 1868, and 
is a son of the late N. P. Bowsher, who found- 



SOUTH BEND 



179 



ed the business. When he was three years 
of age his parents removed to South Bend, 
and here he attended the public schools and 
graduated with an exceptionally creditab'e 
record in 1884. For a short time he was en- 
gaged by the South Bend Tribune, and then 
entered the factory of his father, and has been 
identified with its interests since that time. 
During his connection with the company it 
has developed from a modest mechanical ven- 
ture into the present extensive proportions, 
and has become one of the leading industries 
of the city. Mr. Bowsher is a practical and 
progressive business man, and is master of 
every detail of the large and increasing busi- 
ness. He resides at No. 808 West Washington 
street. 



ous citizens of South Bend began to call the 
town "Pin Hook," from the peculiar shape 
of the river at that point, and the sarcasm 
of the nickname and the amusement it occa- 
sioned practically killed the town, and the 
reverend doctor's collegiate aspirations. Dr. 
Dayton shortly removed to South Bend and 
located permanently here, and to this day the 
site of the old town of Portage is called "Pin 
Hook." Prior to his coming here Dr. Day- 
ton had an extensive practice in South Bend, 
and it was largely increased when he settled 
here. He was a polished and genial gentle- 
man, generous, tender hearted, and possessed 
all the individual elements of popularity, and 
was deeply interested in the growth of the 
village. The town was organized in 1831, with 
a population of 128, but the o ganization was 



DR. DANIEL DAYTON. 



For more than fifty-three years of his quiet 
and unassuming but useful and honored life, 
Dr. Daniel Dayton was identified with the 
growth and progress of South Bend, and his 
lamented death, which occurred May 26, 1889, 
was regarded as a public bereavement. He 
was a native of New Hampshire, and was 
born May 27, 1806. His ancestors were of the 
old Dayton and Morey families of England, 
who came to America and located in New 
England in 1640. He received an excellent 
education and afterwaid took a classical course 
at Union College, New York, where he grad- 
uated in 1831. During his last year he com- 
menced the study of medicine, and after his 
graduation entered Dartmouth Col ege, New 
Hampshire, where he was awarded the degree 
of A. M., and then graduated from the Medical 
College at Geneva, New Yoik, in 1836. He 
began the practice of his profession at once 
at Syracuse, N. Y., and the same year was 
married to Miss Catherine Pell, and came west, 
locating in St. Joseph County, Indiana. At 
that time Judge Elisha Egbert had founded 
a rival town to South Bend, about two miles 
down the river, which he called Portage, and 
Dr. Dayton was induced by Judge Egbert to 
settle there on his arrival in this locality. At 
that time Portage had two taverns, two gener- 
al stores, two blacksmith shops and several 
other minor enterprises. Among the residents 
were Rev. Abner Morse, a gentleman of learn- 
ing and eloquence, but somewhat eccentric. 
He proposed to establish a college of learn- 
ing at Portage, but about this time the envi- 



t**\ 




DR. DANIEL DAYTON. 



abandoned in 1837 and not resumed until 1845. 
Then Hon. John Brownfield was chosen first 
president; William H. Patterson, clerk, and 
as smallpox was epidemic at the time, Drs. 
Dayton, Humphreys, Sheffield, Brown and 
Merritt, and Messrs. A. M. LaPierre and B. F. 
Miller, were appointed as a Boaid of Health, 
the two latter to take care of the patients, 
because they had already had the disease. 



180 



SOUTH BEND 



Among Dr. Dayton's patients at this time was 
Hon. Schuyler Colfax, who was stricken with 
the disease, and between these two men a 
friendship was formed which lasted through 
life. In 1846 Dr. Dayton succeeded Mr. Colfax 
as Assessor of South Bend, and after that he 
served as Town Treasurer. Dr. Dayton, early 
in the history of the city, was proprietor of 
the Sheffield drug store on North Michigan 
street, and when the Maine law was in force 
here, in 1852 and 1854, he was designated to 
dispense liquor for medicinal purposes, so great 
was the public confidence reposed in him. Aft- 
er the incorporation of the City of South Bend, 
Dr. Dayton was a member of the City Council 
for several years, and was instrumental in 
effecting many improvements and advancing 
the best interests of the city. When the war 
of the rebellion occurred he was appointed 
Examining Surgeon of the Army, and had 
charge of the examination of all enlisted men 
before enrollment, with headquarters at 
Michigan City. He filled this position until 
the close of the war, when he returned home 
and resumed his active practice. His life 
was an epitome of good deeds and kindly acts. 
Broad minded and charitable to a marked de- 
gree, his hand was ever extended to help the 
needy and unfortunate. A foe to cant and 
hypocrisy, his life was an earnest, open, un- 
remitting effort to help and elevate his fellow 
man. and to build up a high and nobler civiU- 
zation. Next to his great love for his family 
was his warm regard for the soldiers who 
went forth to battle for their country, and he 
was always the soldier's iriend. He was one 
of the organizers of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, and was a member of the local post 
from 1866 until his death. Shortly after com- 
ing to South Bend an infant daughter died, 
and his first wife passed away in 1840. and 
her death was followed by that of his re- 
maining daughter, Sarah Frisbee. On Janu- 
ary 11, 1844, Dr. Dayton was married to Miss 
Anna Maria Wade, a sister of the late Colonel 
A. B. Wade, of the Seventy-third Indiana Regi- 
ment, and this union was blessed with two 
children. Mary J., who became the wife of Mr. 
Samuel T. Applegate. and who is now deceased, 
and James H. Dayton, Captain in the United 
States Navy. Mrs. Dayton, the estimable and 
accomplished widow of the honored doctor, 
is still living in this city, endeared to hosts 
of friends, and her declining years are cheered 
and brightened by the warm regard of the 
many who have known her through life, and by 
the tender care and affection of her npble son. 



A. D. BAKER. 
Mr. A. D. Baker, secretary and treasurer 
of the South Bend Chilled Plow Company, 
is one of the leading business men of the 
city, and since 1878 has been connected with 
the company of which he is a prominent offi- 
cial. Mr. Baker was horn in Decatur, Illinois, 
April 25, 1865, and is the son of the late George 
W. Baker and Katherine (Dewey) Baker. His 
father was one of the organizers and a promi- 
nent official of the company for nearly a quar- 
ter o! a century. Mr. Baker received his early 
education in Decatur, and learned the trade 
of a watchmaker and silversmith, being ap- 




A. D. BAKER. 

prenticed for three years, which he faithfully 
served. He removed to South Bend in 1878 
and entered the works of the South Bend 
Chilled Plow Company, where he devoted his 
best energies to the advancement of its inter- 
ests. After occupying various positions of a 
minor character, he was made vice president, 
and upon the death of his father, in 1900, was 
made secretary and treasurer of the company 
to succeed him, which position he now holds. 
He is a practical business man of progressive 
ideas, and has managed the affairs of the 
company with rare skill and ability. He is 
prominently known in the community, and is 
the president of the Indiana Club of this 
city. Mr. Baker was mariied to Miss Bessie 
Hines, of Madison, Indiana, and with his esti- 
mable wife resides at No. 726 West Washing- 
ton street. 



SOUTH BEND. 



181 



WILLIAM L. TEMPLE. 

Mr. William Lewis Temple, secretary and 
treasurer of the Temple & Ellis Company, 
one of the largest manufacturers of cigars in 
the state, is a native of English, Crawford 
County, Indiana, and was born January 15, 
1858. He was a son of Mr. William L. Temple, 
a prominent druggist, and a clerk and treas- 
urer of that county, and of Martha (Landers) 
Temple. Until he was twelve years of age he 
attended the public schools at Leavenworth, 
the county seat of Crawford County. Where 
his parents removed when he was nine years 
of age. In 1870 young Temple went into 
the County Treasurer's office, his father being 




WILLIAM L. TEMPLE. 

County Treasurer, and served there two years. 
At the expiration of that lime his father was 
elected County Clerk, and Mr. Temple was 
made chief deputy clerk, being then but fif- 
teen years old. He next went to Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, where he was private secretary to the 
Warden of the Nebraska State Prison, and 
remained one year. He returned to Leaven- 
worth and entered the County Clerks office, 
where he lemained until 1875, when he went 
into the drug business with nis father, under 
the style of William L. Temple & Son. Here 
he continued until 18S2, when he was elected 
County Auditor, and served until 1886, when 
he was twenty years of age, being the youngest 
county official ever elected in the state of 



Indiana. He then went on the road, traveling 
tor a wholesale and manufacturing cigar 
house, and then went with the wholesale drug 
house of A. Kiefer & Co., of Indianapolis, 
where he had charge of the cigar department. 
In 1890 he came to South Bend and organized 
and incorporated the Temple, Hummel & El- 
lis Company and started in the manufacture 
of cigars. After seven years Mr. Hummel 
retired and the present company was organ- 
ized. The company is one of the largest in 
the west, and its handsome four story and 
basement factory at Wayne and Carroll 
streets, gives employment to 700 persons. The 
company manufactures high grade cigars, its 
leading brands being "Wedding Blossom" and 
"Thomas A. Hendricks," in ten cent goods, 
and "A Star 1," "Secietary Gage" and "Pad- 
lock" in nickel goods. Over 100 brands are 
made, and fully 50,000,000 cigars turned out 
annually. Mr. Temple is a business man of 
ability and integrity, and is a member of 
the Indiana Club. He was married in 1879 
to Miss Mary L. Scott, of Leavenworth, Indi- 
ana, and resides at No. 347 Colfax avenue. 
For the past four years Mr. Temple has lived 
in Denver, Coloiado. Returning east, he was 
in Galveston, Texas, during the terrible tidal 
wave which swept away the city in September, 
1900, and killed thousands of people. Mr. 
Temple was a guest at a leading hotel there at 
the time. 



PEKKINS ELLIS. 
Mr. Perkins Ellis, president of the Temple 
& Ellis Company, manufacturers of cigars, 
is a native of Virginia, and was born in the 
city of Richmond, January 25, 1S61. His 
father, Richard S. Ellis, was an extensive and 
wealthy land owner in Southern Virginia, and 
was engaged in several large enterprises in 
Richmond. His mother was Nannie F. (Per- 
kins) Ellis, and his family is one of the promi- 
nent ones of the Old Dominion. When he 
had completed his education he spent two 
years on his father's farm, and then went to 
Richmond, where he engaged with the Ivey 
& Powell Tobacco Company, where he re- 
mained two years, when he went with the 
firm of Allen & Ginter, cigarette manufactur- 
ers. After two years with this firm he went 
to Louisville, Kentucky, where he had charge 
of a branch house of tne firm for five years, 
in 1891 he came to South Bend and became a 
member of the Temple, Hummel & Ellis Com- 
pany, which was organized and incorporated 
in that year, and purchased the business of 



182 



SOUTH BEND 



the Mutual Union Cigar Company, which had 
been established tour years previous. Two 
years later Mr. Hummel retired and Messrs. 
W. L. Temple and Mr. Ellis reorganized the 
company under a new charter, with Mr. Ellis 
as president and Mr. Temple as secretary and 
treasurer, the same existing to-day. When 
Mr. Ellis started in the business the company 
employed but seventy persons, and in 1900 
there were over 300 employes, and they man- 
ufactured 12,000,000 cigars. In 1901 the com- 
pany erected a four story and basement fac- 
tory at Wayne and Carroll streets, with a 
capacity of 50,000.000 cigars annually and em- 




PEKK1XS ELLIS. 



ploying 700 persons. The company does an 
enormous business in the South, No.thwest, 
and West, its leading brands of cigars being 
"Wedding Blossom" and" Thomas A. Hen- 
ricks" in ten cent goods, and "A Star 1," 
"Secretary Gage" and "Padlock" in nickel 
goods. Over a hundred different brands are 
manufactured. Mr. Ellis is a most capable 
and energetic business man, a public spirited 
citizen and prominent in social and fraternal 
life. He was married in 1889 to Miss Adele 
Davidson, of Uniontown, Alabama, and his es- 
timable wife died the following year. 



COL. NORMAN EDDY. 

Col. Norman Eddy was one of the most dis- 
tinguisned citizens of South Bend, and his 
death, which occurred at indianapoiis, on Jan- 
uary 28, 1872, while he was Secretary of State 
of Indiana, was deeply depiored by all. Colonel 
Eddy was a native of New York, and was born 
at Scipio, Cayuga County, December 10, 1810. 
He was of English ancestry, the first of the 
name In America coming to New England in 
1630. His tatner was an early settler of New 
York State, and a successful farmer of that 
state, and his motner was of an early Con- 
necticut family. The young man attended the 
country schools until he was sixteen years 
of age, when he went to Cazenovia Seminary, 
where he remained until the comp.etion of 
his studies. He was a natural student, and 
his mother desired him to study for the min- 
istry, but he preferred uie army, and seeking 
to enter West Point, was unsuccessful. He 
then chose the law and became a student in 
the otnce of William H. Seward, who was 
Secretary of State under President Lincoln. 
His choice of a profession not meeting with 
his mothers favor, he decided to study medi- 
cine, and became a student in the office of 
Dr. James S. Hahn, who was practicing in 
Canoga, New \ork. In 1S33 he entered Jef- 
ferson College, at Philadelphia, studying un- 
der such learned Instructors as Drs. Jackson, 
Hare and others, and graduated in 1835. 
shortly afterward he was mairied to Anna 
M. Me.chior, daughter of Horatio Laurens 
M. Meichior, daughter of Horatio Laurens 
loo, New York. After four years experience 
he determined to go west, and in 1S40 he 
accepted the flattering inducements offered 
him by Wmiam and Nathaniel Lee, of Mish- 
awaka, Indiana, and located in that town. He 
remained there in successiul practice for sev- 
en years, and then removed to South Bend, 
where he formed a partnership with the late 
Dr. Louis Humphreys. He still, however, had 
a desire to practice law, ana he commenced a 
course of legal studies, being admitted to the 
bar on April 1, j.847, and iorming a partner- 
ship with Hon. Joseph Jernegan, a leading 
attorney of South Bend. He was a warm ad- 
vocate of Democratic principles, and with 
others established the "iHishawaka Tocsin," 
but it did not prove a financial success. Dur- 
ing the war with Mexico he organized a com- 
pany of cavalry, but it was not accepted by 
the government. As a lawyer he opened his 
way to public life, and three years afterward 
he was elected State Senator. Among the 



SOUTH BEND, 



183 



measures advocated by him and passed were 
increased allowances to the Blind, Deaf and 
DumD and Insane Asylums, the prevention of 
aliens absorbing the lands of the state against 
actual settlers, and the purchase of whole 
townships for a few cents per acre by specu- 
lators and swamp sharks. In 1852 he was 
elected to Congress, hut two years later was 
defeated for reelection by Schuyler Colfax, on 
the Kansas-Nebraska issue. In 1855 he was 
appointed by President Pierce as Attorney 
General for Minnesota Territory, and Piesi- 
dent Buchanan tendered him the Ministry to 
The Hague and Netherlands, which he was 
constrained to decline. In 1857 he was ap- 
pointed Commissioner for the sale of the 



f «s *££ yk 




COL. NORMAN EDDY. 

Delaware trust lands, and he performed these 
duties with his usual fidelity, the Indians 
expressing a wish to adopt him into their 
tribe. When tne war of the rebellion oc- 
curred Colonel Eddy's patriotism was aroused, 
and without regaid for party affiliations he 
organized the Forty-eighth Indiana Volunteers 
and was commissioned as its Colonel. He 
tought with distinguished bravery and was se- 
verely wounded at the battle of luka. He a. so 
participated in the battles of Grand Gulf, 
Coiinth, and the siege of Vicksburg until its 
suriender, and other important engagements, 
and after Vicksburg was taken he resigned be- 
cause of the wounds he had received and re- 
turning home resumed the practice of law. 



In 1865 he was appointed Collector of In- 
ternal Revenue by President Johnson, and in 
1870 he was elected Secretaiy of State by the 
Democrats of Indiana. Here, as elsewhere, 
his high character was impressed upon the 
office he held, and he won the confidence of 
both political parties. His failing health, 
however, was not sufficient for his arduous 
duties, and at last, on January 28, 1S72, at 
the age of sixty-one years, he passed away 
from the cares and the honors of earth. As a 
citizen lie was active and progressive, as a 
statesman he was wise and pure, as a soldier 
brave and patriotic, and in his private life 
he was not less true, honoiab.e and levered, 
in his nature he was generous and sympa- 
thetic, his heart was always open to appeal, 
and his hand gave freely, it may be said of 
him that "he loved not his neighbor as well, 
but better than himself. " At the bar he was 
always a leading advocate and won the warm 
regard of his legal associates, who paid a 
touching tribute to his memory. His name is 
peipetuated by a Grand Army Post and a 
Woman s Relief corps named in his honor. 
Mrs. Eddy, his widow, died February 3, 18S1. 
Uf his six children three are living. His only 
son, Owen, filled the unexpired term of his 
lather, and was afterward Band Commission- 
er. He dieu in Indianapolis in December, 
1887. 



CALVERT H. DEFREES. 

Mr. Calvert H. Defrees, the well known con- 
tractor and builder of sidewalks and paving, 
is a native of South Bend, and a business 
man of high standing and integrity, and has 
won success by tully deserving u. He was 
born in 1859, and is a son of Joseph H. 
Defrees and Sarah (Calvert) Defrees. When 
a boy he attended the public schools here, 
and had a good education and training. Mr. 
Defrees began his business career in the con- 
tracting business as a street paver and builder 
of cement sidewalks, and has continued in this 
line and made a high reputation for the ex- 
cellence and high character of his work. There 
is hardly a street in South Bend but shows 
his work in either paving or sidewalk build- 
ing. He also does cement work for cellars, 
breweries, markets, private drives, etc. Mr. 
Defrees employs only the most skilled men in 
these lines, and his facilities are such that 
he can promptly fill any contract. Mr. Defrees 
has been twice married. His first wife, Miss 
Ella Curl, to whom he was married in 1S78, 
died in 1883. Two years later he married Miss 



184 



SOUTH BEND. 



Mary S. Brown, and resides at No. 315 South 
Taylor street. Among the many contracts 
completed by Mr. Defrees may be mentioned 
the paving with brick of Vistula avenue, St. 




CALVERT II. DBFKEES. 

Joseph street, Carroll street, South Main 
street, North Michigan street, Hudson court, 
Leland avenue, LeMont terrace, Chapin 
street, South Michigan street, East Water 
street, South street, Paris street, West Jef- 
ferson street, Walnut street, and others. He 
built the sewers in Vistula avenue, North 
Main, East Water, Gushing, South Michigan, 
Washington, Collax, Carroll, Division, St. Jo- 
seph, Circle avenue, West Washington and 
other streets. 



HON. JOHiS B. STOLE. 

Ho.i. John B. Stoll, the able editor and pro- 
prietor of "The South Bend Times," has long 
been recognized as a forceful and successful 
journalist, and as one ot the intellectual lead- 
ers of the Democratic party in Indiana. He 
is a native of Germany, and was born in the 
Kingdom of Wurtemoerg, March 13, 1843. 
His father was a large land owner, and was 
drowned in the River Murg, and the son was 
born several months after his death. He 
found a home with his grandparents, and at 
six years of age he first attended school. In 
1853 he came to America with his mother and 
located at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where 



two years later his mother died and he was 
left an orphan at the age of twelve years. 
Being thrown upon his own resources the boy 
sought any employment that promised suffi- 
cient return for his daily needs, and after fol- 
lowing a number of occupations he secured 
employment in the printing office of the Har- 
risburg "Telegiaph" and "Der Vaterlands- 
Waeehter." This was the turning point of 
his life, and marked the beginning of a career 
which has won for him honor in the field of 
journalism. He mastered the English lan- 
guage, was a great student and an incessant 
reader, and being offered the opportunity of 
studying for the ministry, he chose instead 
the active field of politics. Though a Demo- 
crat, he opposed the extension of slavery- In 
I860, though only seventeen years of age, he 
was chosen a delegate to the Douglas State 
Convention, and delivered a masterly speech 
at the ratification meeting held in Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania. He made the acquaintance of 
the leading men of his party and went to 
Middlebuig, where he worked as a journey- 
man on the "People's Friend." In 1863, 
though but twenty years of age, he purchased 
the paper, which he greatly improved. The 
following year he was elected a member of 




HON. JOHN B. STOLL. 

the School Boara, and later was chosen as 
Auditor of Snyder County. He came to Indi- 
ana in 1866 and began the publication of the 
"Ligonier Banner," and three years later he 



SOUTH BEND. 



185 



established and edited the Laporte "Argus." 
In 1873 he edited the South Bend "Courier,' 
published in German. Afterward he purchased 
the Elkhart "Daily and Weekly Democrat,' 
subsequently the Elkhart "Monitor," in 1881 
He organized the Press Association o£ North 
era Indiana, and was its president for six 
years, and in January, 1881, was one of the 
organizers of the Democratic State Editorial 
Association, and was its first president. As 
a newspaper writer Mr. Stoll is forceful, clear 
and convincing, and he has won a wide repu- 
tation as a public speaker. He is a progres- 
sive journalist, and under his management 
"The Times" has become a successful business 
enterprise and commands the respect and 
patronage of men of all parties. Mr. Stoll 
has also been engaged in other business en- 
terprises, and is regarded as one of the 
successful and prominent business men of 
this city, and is highly esteemed. He was 
married in 1861, and his family consisted of 
eight children, four of whom are now living — 
Ella C, Eva B., Edgar A. and Elmer Roscoe. 
Mr. Stoll is a public spirited citizen in the 
highest sense and has ever labored for the 
material welfare and advancement of the City 
or South Bend. 



JAMES B. STALEY. 

Prominent among the progressive and suc- 
cessful real estate dealers in this city must 
be mentioned the name of Mr. James B. Staley, 
of the well known firm of Staley & Robinson, 
whose handsome offices are located at No. 110 
South Michigan sreet. Mr. Staley was born 
in Plymouth, Indiana, August 26, 1862, and his 
father, S. S. Staley, was a prominent farmer, 
woolen manufacturer and tanner in that local- 
ity. He attended the district schools in the 
vicinity of his home, and in 1879 he came to 
South Bend, where he was engaged in the 
woolen mill of A. C. Staley & Co., and then 
for eight years was engaged in the machinery 
department of the Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, during the last three years of which 
he was assistant engineer. He was then en- 
gaged in the manufactory of Wilson Bros, as 
machinist and engineer, where he remained 
twelve years. During this time Mr. Staley was 
engaged in the real estate business, devoting 
his time to it in the evenings, and succeeded 
in building up a large business. In May, 1899, 
he formed a partnership with Mr. Samuel M. 
Robinson, under the name of James B. Staley 
& Co., which, in January, 1900, was changed 
to Staley and Robinson. The firm does an ex- 



tensive business in real estate, loans and in- 
surance, and during the year their transac- 
tions amounted to $400,000.00. They are part 
owners of the City View Place Subdivision, 
The LaSalle Park Addition, and are own- 
ers and agents for Robinson's & Haugh- 
ton's Addition, and for lots in Arnold's 
and Fisher's Subdivisions, and a number of 
other fine tracts in various parts of the city. 
Mr. Staley is largely interested in rich yield- 
ing oil lands in Adams and Jasper Counties, 
Indiana, and in ten counties in the State of 



..-**"** 



• *■ 



? 




JAMES B. STALEY, 

Kentucky, in the Mount Sterling Oil and 
Gas Company, and in the Indiana Oil and As- 
phalt Company. He is also interested in about 
300,000 acres of coal lands in Kentucky, which 
yield both the cannel and bituminous coal, 
which show about 28,000 tons to the acre 
where developed. Mr. Staley is also connect- 
ed with the Indiana Anchor Fence Company. 
He is an enterprising and energetic business 
man, and has been remarkably successful in 
all his undertakings. He is well known in 
the community, and is highly esteemed, and 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
the K. O. T. M. Mr. Staley was married to 
Miss Amelia Leppke, of South Bend, and has 
an interesting family of five children. His 
home is located at No. 907 Prairie avenue. 



186 



SOUTH BEND. 



SAMUEL M. ROBINSON. 

Mr. Samuel M. Robinson, of the well known 
firm of Staley & Robinson, whose suite of 
offices is located at No. 110 South Michigan 
street, has been identified with the commer- 
cial interests of this city for nearly a quar- 
ter 01 a centuiy. He is a native of Michigan 
and was born near St. Joseph, in Berrien 
County, of that siate, April 2, 1882. His father, 
John Robinson, now deceased, was a p.om- 
inent farmer in that locality. Mr. Robmson 
attended the district schools in the vicinity 
of his home, and when but fourteen years 
of age commenced the task of earning a liv- 
ing for himself. He came to South Bend in 
1876 and entered the employ of George Wy- 
man & Co., as a boy. He remained with this 
firm until January, 1900, gradually forging to 
the front until he became a partner in that 
extensive establishment. Mr. Robinson was 
always energetic and ambitious to succeed, 
and by his own efforts and piogressive shrewd- 
ness has attained his present prominence in 
the commuity. He connected himself with Mr. 
James B. Staley in the real estate, loan and 
insurance business in May, 1899, under the 
firm name of James B. Staley & Co., but 
on his retirement from the firm of George 
Wyman & Co. he devoted himself entirely to 
this business and the Aim was changed to 
Staley & Robinson January 1, 1900. Mr. Rob- 
inson was first interested with Dudley M. 
Shively and F.G.Conklin, in the purcnase of rich 
oil lands in Indiana, kuowu as the Interstate 
Oil Company, which were disposed of at a 
handsome sum. .Later he devoted himself 
largely to the investigation of prospective oil 
fields in liiis state and Kentucky, and is the 
owner of many valuable oil and coal proper- 
ties. He is now interested in the ownership 
of 600 acies and the control by least of 15,000 
acies of rich oil lands, which piomise abun- 
dant returns on the original investment. These 
lands are located in Jasper County, Indiana, 
and Mr. Robinson Is also part owner in large 
holdings in Adams County, and developments 
are being made in these properties. Mr. Rob- 
inson is the president of the Mount Sterling 
Oil and Gas Company, and the Indiana Oil 
and Asphalt Company. The firm of Staley 
& Robinson is also interested in options on 
about 300,000 acres of coal lands in Kentucky, 
in which are found large veins of cannel 
and other bituminous coals of excellent qual- 
ity, and which, being located above the water 
level, can be mined at nearly one-half the 
cost of coal found below that line. In some 



instances the mines show a yield of 2S,000 tons 
to the acre. In their real estate transactions 
the firm of Staley & Robinson has been re- 
maikably successful, and aggregated about 
$400,000.00 during the first year of its opera- 
tions. The firm is part owner of the City View 
Place Addition, the LaSalle Park Addition, 
and agents and part owners of the Robinson 
& Haughton's Addition, and of lots in Arnold's 
and Fisher's Additions, and in other tracts in 
and near the city. Mr. Robinson is also a 
stockholder in the Indiana Anchor Fence 
Company and a number of other local enter- 




SAMUEL M. KOBINSON. 

prises. He is an active business man of 
high reputation and progressive ideas, and has 
won deserved success in every field of opera- 
tions in which he nas been engaged. He en- 
joys the confidence and esteem of the com- 
munity, and is a member of the Commercial- 
Athletic Club, the Lodge and Encampment of 
Odd Fellows, and for two terms was the 
Commander of the Knights of the Maccabees 
in this city. He was married to Mary S. 
Sigerfoose, of El'khart County, and with his 
estimable wife and son resides at No. 925 
West Washington street. 



DR. WILLIAM B. BLACKSTONE. 

Dr. William B. Blackstone, who has recently 
established himself in the practice of his pio- 
fession here, is an able physician, who has 
had an extensive practice and a wide experi- 



SOUTH BEND 



187 



ence at Crown Point, Indiana, for nearly fif- 
teen years. He was born in Hebion, Indiana, 
February 8, 1860. His father. Dr. J. K. Black- 
stone, was in successful practice there for 




WILLIAM (J. MlSHLER. 

Mr. Wihiam C. Mishler, the president of the 
Mishler, Penrod & Abbott Company, extensive 
manufacturer and exporters of hardwood 
lumber, whose business extends all over the 
United States and Europe, is a native of 
Goshen, Indiana, and was born March 5, 1849. 
He is the son of Peter S. and Rachel (Croyle) 
Mishler, both natives of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, but who came to Indiana and engaged 
in the farming and saw mill business, when 
Mr. Mishler was but a boy. He attended the 
public schools at Goshen, and after complet- 
ing his education he worked for his father 
until 1876, when he went to the lumber distiict 
of Michigan. On his return he moved to 
Goshen, and for twelve years was connected 
with the prominent lumber concern known as 
the Lesh, Saunders & Egbert Company, dur- 
ing the last six years of which he was a mem- 
ber of the company. In 1S94 Mr. Mishler 
operated at Wakarusa, Indiana, in partnership 
with Mr. C. C. Shaffer, and remained theie 
two years, after which they removed the busi- 
ness to oouth Bend as the firm of Shaffer & 
Mishler. At the expiration of two years he 
purchased Mr. Shaffer's interest, and in 1898 
reorganized it under the style of the present 



DK. WILLIAM li. BLAC'KSTONE. 



many years, and his b. other is also a member 
of the medical profession. He attended the 
State Univeisity at Bioomington. and is a 
graduate of the Medical Department of the 
Northwestern University of Illinois, in the 
class of 1884, and for a year was resident 
physician and surgeon at St. Luke's Hospital 
in Chicago. He established himself at Crown 
Point, and has been in practice the.e until 
lie came to South Bend. He is an expert 
physician and surgeon, and has been most suc- 
cessful in t. eating chronic diseases. He has 
a handsome suite of offices in the new Arnold 
building at 216 West Jefferson street, where 
he has insta.led a nebulizing apparatus and 
a complete static battery for perfect X ray 
examinations under the Roentgen system, the 
only one of its kind in the city. He has made 
a close study of tne application of the X ray, 
and does a rapidly increasing business. He 
is a member of the Indiana State Medical 
and Lake County Medical Societies, and is 
a contributor to leading medical journals. He 
was married to Miss Lou Smith, and resides 
at No. 312 South Lafayette street. 




WILLIAM C. MISHLER. 

coiporation, of which he became the president 
and active business head. Mr. Mishler is one 
of the best informed lumber mei chants in the 
west. He is a man of forceful character and 



188 



SOUTH BEND. 



indomitable energy, and has earned a high 
reputation in the business community. In 
addition to his lumber interests, he is a stock- 
holder of the Elkhart County Trust and Sav- 
ings Company. In 1892 he was married to Miss 
Eva Brown, and resides with his famLy at 
uoshen, Indiana, where he owns a handsome 
home. 



ANDREW .1. WARD. 
Mr. Andrew J. Ward, who was for many 
years engaged in the livery and transfer busi- 
ness in this city, is a native of St. Joseph 
County, and one of the best known men in 
the community. He was born February 27, 
1844, and his father, George Ward, was a suc- 
cessful farmer in that locality. Mr. Ward 




active business. In December, 1900, Mr. Ward 
was appointed Po.ice Commissioner by Gov- 
ernor Mount, with the consent and approval 
of Governor-elect Durbin, to fill the vacancy 
on the board occasioned by the death of David 
H. Leeper. Mr. Ward was chosen over a long 
list of competitors for this responsible posi- 
tion. Mr. Ward is a gentleman who is held 
in the highest esteem by all who know him, 
and a man who has led an unusually active 
and successful life. 



AMJHIOW .1. WARD. 

was engaged in farming pursuits for many 
years in this locality and always took a deep 
interest in public affairs. He was Trustee 
and Assessor of Harris Township for several 
years, and in 1889 was elected Sheriff of St. 
Joseph County, which office he filled with hon- 
or and credit. In 1895 he established a livery 
business on Jefferson street, which he suc- 
cessfully conducted until 1898, when he be- 
came engaged in the transfer business at Nos. 
216-218 North Michigan street, and built up 
the largest business of its kind in the city, 
and one that afforded a perfect service. On 
October 20, 1900, Mr. Ward sold his transfer 
business to Newman & Co., and retired from 



BENJAMIN F. MILLER. 
An honored citizen of South Bend, and one 
who was a strenuous leader in the cause of 
human liberty long before civil war eman- 
cipated the slaves of the South and abolished 
slavery forever from our land, was Mr. Ben- 
jamin F. Miller, whose death occurred in this 
city April 17, 18SS, at the ripe age of seventy- 
seven years. Mr. Miller was a Pennsylvanian 
by birth, and was born in Westmoreland 
county, July 27, 1811. His father, Francis 
Miller, was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and a 
man of fine scholarly atcainments. Under his 
influence the son early developed a taste for 
literature and decided to adopt the profes- 
sion of journalism. He learned the printing 
business in the office of "Genius of Liberty," 
at Cniontown, Fayette County, and while 
there formed the acquaintance of Hon. John 
Brownfield, B. F. Price, anu others, who after- 
ward attained prominence in this city. At 
twenty years of age he founded a paper called 
"The Philanthropist, - a strong and leading 
anti-slavery publication. He soon was intense- 
ly hated by the slave owners of the South, 
and as warmly admired by the abolitionists 
of the North. In 18i!5 ne was induced to 
locate his paper in Cincinnati, Ohio, by Hon. 
James G. Birney, an ardent abolition leader, 
who had freed his own slaves in Danville, 
Kentucky, and then led the moral crusade 
against slavery. These two men joined hands 
and printed their paper jointly, and were the 
organizers of the great Liberty party. About 
a year afterward the office of the paper was 
seized by a party of slave owners from Cov- 
ington, Kentucky, and their presses, types 
and materials thrown into the Ohio river. 
Though left without means, both men re- 
mained ardent advocates of human freedom, 
and Mr. Miller then took charge of a paper 
in West Chester, Pennsylvania. "The Phil- 
anthropist" was revived, and in 1840 and 1844 
Mr. Birney was the nominee of the Libeity 
party for President of the United States. Mr. 



SOUTH BEND 



180 



Miller remained in West Chester until 1838, 
and Bayard Taylor, the great author, was his 
apprentice. After leaving Pennsylvania Mr. 
Miller came to South Bend, where his father. 





BENJAMIN P. MILLEK. 

mother, three brothers and two sisters had 
previously located, and he took a position in 
the "South Bend Free Press" which was pur- 
chased by the Hon. Schuyler Colfax in 1845 
and changed to "The Register." as an editorial 
writer and manager of the paper during the 
absence of the publisher. In 1852 he was 
elected Sheriff of the county by the Whigs, 
and ably served two terms. In 1867 his son, 
Alfred B. Miller, and son-in-law, Elmer 
Crockett, became the proprietors of "The 
Register," and although he was nearly sixty 
years of age, he entered the printing office 
and set type for the paper for nearly five 
years. When "The Tribune" was founded by 
these same gentlemen, Mr. Miller set the type 
on that successful and enterprising journal 
until he was seventy-two years old, when he 
was persuaded to retire from active business 
life. His remaining years were passed among 
his books and papers, and to the last he kept 
himself fully informed upon all the important 
topics of the times and current literature. 
He was a charter member of the Sons of Tem- 
perance, the Temple of Honor and the Good 
Templars, and one of the earliest members 
of South Bend Loage of Odd Fellows. On 
September 18, 1833, he was married to Miss 



Eliza Baird, of Payette County, Pennsylvania, 
who died September 21, 1885. He had seven 
children, three ot whom died in their infancy. 
Robert B. Miller, a prominent journalist in 
California, died in 1880, and Alfred B. Miller 
was for years connected with the South Bend 
Tribune. His daughter, Annie, is now the 
estimable wife of Mr. Elmer Crockett, and 
Fermine is the wife of Mr. John M. Deffen- 
baugh. Mr. Miller was a consistent member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and was a most 
genial and companionable gentleman. He was 
ever geneious in his nature and always re- 
sponded to an appeal for assistance, and his 
death was deeply mourned. 



CHARLES G. FOLSOM. 

Mr. Chailes G. Folsom, one of South Bend's 
successful manufacturers, is a native of Water- 
loo, Seneca County, New York, and was born 
November 2, 1845. Mr. Folsom comes of hardy 
Yankee stock, whose progenitors figured in 
the revolutionary war. His father, Benjamin 
Folsom, was a native of Vermont, and comes 
of that branch of the Folsom family of which 
Colonel William Folsom, aid-de-camp oil Gen- 
eral Washington's staff, was a member. His 




CHARLES G. FOLSOM. 

mother was Polly (Sedgwick) Folsom, and 
conies of a family prominent in the early 
history of the settlements along the Mohawk 
Valley. Mr. Folsom's father was a wagon 



mo 



SOUTH BEND 



maker by trade, and later was widely known 
as a railway contractor and builder. Young 
Fo'.som lived at Waterloo -until lie was three 
years of age, when his parents removed to 
Hornellsville, New York, where he attended 
the public schools. In 1S51 he removed to 
Adrian, Michigan, where he also attended 
school, and in 185"6 he removed to Olive Town- 
ship, St. Joseph County, where he engaged 
in farming. He then returned to Adrian, where 
he remained four years, and then went to 
Detroit, where he learned the trade of a sheet 
iron worker. On August 28. 1866, he returned 
to South Bend, and was employed one year by 
the firm of Nicar, Deming & Nicar. and then 
went to Champaign County, Illinois, where he 
engaged in the uairy business and lived five 
years. In 1873 he returned to South Bend 
and bought out the business of G. L. Dunham, 
at 122 South Michigan street. He afterward 
went to Rolling Prairie, Indiana, where he was 
engaged in the hardware business six years. 
In 1885 he came back to South Bend and 
worked at his tiade. and in 1888 went to Chat- 
atnooga. Tennessee. For five years he traveled 
for Miller & Knoblock and the Birdsell Com- 
pany, and in 1893 started in his present busi- 
ness. Mr. Folsom is an extensive manufacturer 
of heavy sheet iion work, and also makes 
mail boxes for the new rural free delivery 
service. His plant is large and specially fitted, 
and employment is given to a large force, and 
his products are shipped to all parts of the 
country. Mr. Folsom is purely a self made 
man, and he is an energetic and capable man 
of high standing. He is a member of the 
American Society of Heating and Ventilating 
Engineers of New York City. He was married 
in 1867 to Miss Katheiine France, of Rolling 
Piairie, Indiana, who died April 9, 1890. He 
was married a second time. July 15, 1891, to 
Miss Saiah Jane Cassell, of Elkhart, and re- 
sides at No. 630 South Michigan street. 



VIRGIN1US NIUAR. 

Mr. Virginius Nicar, who is at present prom- 
inently engaged in the real estate business, 
has been identified with the history of South 
Bend since early boyhood. He was born in 
Mishawaka. November 1, 1841, and is the son 
of Robert B. and Mary E. (.Llewellyn) Nicar. 
His father, who came to South Bend in 1851, 
was engaged in the hardware business, and 
for six yeais was County Treasurer of St. 
Joseph County. Young Nicar was educated in 
the public schools of this city, and later at- 
tended Hi.lsdale College. He naturally adopt- 



ed the business of his father, and also learned 
the tinner's trade. In 1865, in connection with 
his brother, Edwin, he purchased the busi- 
ness, which was carried on under the name of 
Nicar, Deming & Co. During the war of the 
rebellion, although but a youth, he enlisted in 
the volunteers, but the quota of the state being 
filled, he was not called upon to serve. In 
1875 he sold out his nardware business and 
was engaged in farming for ten years in this 
county. He then became purchasing agent 
for the Birdsell Manufacturing Company, and 
remained in this position four years. In 1890 
he engaged in his present business, and has 
been largely interested in local real estate 
and mortgage investments. He successfully 




VIliUlNIUS NICAK. 

handled the Linden Place Addition for Messrs. 
Rapp. Sibley & Fasshaeht, and the Cushing and 
Lindsay Additions, and now devotes much of 
his time to that valuable property known as 
Taylors Field Addition. He was married to 
Miss Mary T. Taylor, the youngest daughter 
of Lathi op M. Taylor, who at one time owned 
nearly the entire ground upon which this city 
is built. Mr. Nicar is an energetic business 
man of progressive ideas, and is widely known. 
For the past five years he has been Township 
Assessor for Poitage Township. He is also 
interested in the mining business in Montana 
and Idaho, and is the p: esident of the South 
Bend and Montana Mining and Milling Com- 
pany. He has one son, Mr. Robert L. Nicar, 
who is the manager of the company. 



SOUTH BEND 



191 



ROLLO G. PAGE. 

Mr. Rollo G. Page, the young and enterpris- 
ing lumber merchant, is a member of the firm 
of Martin & Page, whose extensive yaids and 
planing mill is located at No. 1713 South Mieh- 




JOHN G. HARTMAN. 

Among the young, enterprising and success- 
ful business men of South Bend must be men- 
tioned the name of Mr. John G. Hartman, 
whose office is located at No. 125 East Jef- 
ferson street. Mr. Hartman is a native of 
tne Dominion of Canada, and was born at 
Berlin, Januaiy 27. 1874. His father was Gott- 
lieb Hartman, now deceased, but who was well 
Known in Canada and in this city. In 1878 
Mr. Hartman's parents removed to South 
Bend, and here he attended the public and 
high schools. He early commenced the busi- 
ness of buying and selling real estate, and the 
erection of houses for purchasers of lots, and 
has achieved a well earned success. Since 
1895, when he first commenced business, he 
has erected over one hundred and fifty houses 
in various parts of the city. He is also exten- 
sively engaged in the real estate and loan 
business and has conducted extensive sales 
of lots in Hartman & Miller's Plat, Hartman 
& Woodworth's Plat, Shetterly Place, Cush- 
ing's Third and Fourth Additions, and other 
valuable tracts. He transacts a large loaning 
business, and is also the local agent of the 
lollowing fire insurance companies: The Han- 
over, the Security of New Haven, the Western 



ROLLO G. PAGE. 



igan street. Mr. Page is a native of Elkhart, 
Indiana, and was born in that city April 6, 
1876. He is a son of Frederick C. and Alcinda 
(Spaid) Page, and his father is well known in 
that community. As a youth he attended the 
public schools at Elkhart, and later took a 
thoiough course in the Elkhart Business Col- 
lege. His business career was commenced 
with the lumber firm of Martin & Amidon. in 
that city, where he demonstrated marked abil- 
ity and untiring energy. He remained with 
this firm until 1899, when Mr. Martin, the 
senior member ot the firm, recognizing his 
fitness for an active business career, formed 
a partnership with Mr. Page, and they pur- 
chased the planing mill and lumber yards of 
Cook & Adsit, in this city, and Mr. Page was 
placed in charge of the business. Here his 
past experience and sterling business knowl- 
edge were manifested in a high degree, and the 
success of the new firm is assured. Mr. Page 
is unmarried and has hosts of friends promi- 
nent in the social circles of the city. 




JOHN G. HARTMAN. 

Underwriters, the Netherlands of Holland, and 
the Phoenix of Hartfo:d. He also represents 
conducts an accident, casualty and fidelity 
the New York Plate Glass Company, and the 



192 



SOUTH BEND 



Ocean Accident and Guaranty Company, which 
business, and insures against residence and 
commercial burglaries. Mr. Haitman is an 
active and energetic business man, and by his 
liberal and broad minded methods has con- 
tributed largely to the material building up 
of this city. He conducts a large and respon- 
sible business and has won a deservedly high 
reputation. He was married to Miss Hattie 
M. Kurtz, of this city, and resides at No. 1011 
East Washington street. 



LESLIE C. WHITCOMB. 

Mr. Leslie C. Whitcomb, Justice of the Peace 
and elected to succeed himself in 1898, was 
born in Cortland County, New York, Novem- 
ber 28, 1860. His father, Luke P. Whitcomb. 




LESLIE C. WHITCOMB. 

was a well known merchant at Homer, New 
York, but afterward moved to Prescott. Wis- 
consin. Mr. Whitcomb received his early edu- 
cation in the schools at Prescott, and in the 
State Normal School at River Falls. His first 
vocation in life was that of a school teacher, 
which he followed successfully for three years, 
and then went to Milwaukee, where he was 
engaged in a grain commission house on the 
Board of Trade. Being ambitious to embaik 
in business for himself, young Whitcomb went 
to Dakota and remained there during 1883, 
1884 and 1885, in the hardware, farming imple- 
ment and transfer business. Owing to succes- 
sive crop failures his business was not satis- 



factory, and he sold out and returned to Mil- 
waukee. There he connected himself with the 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
and soon after came to South Bend as Assist- 
ant General Agent for Northern Indiana. In 
less than a year after locating in this city he 
was elected General Secretaiy of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, which office he 
held for five years, and devoted himself with 
ability and success to the work of that ex- 
cellent institution. Justice Whitcomb has been 
engaged in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness with success. He was interested in the 
platting of "South Lawn" and "Oak Lawn," 
and other important real estate transactions. 
He is the local agent of the Western Un- 
derwriters Association, the Prussian Nation- 
al Insurance Company and the North German 
Insurance Company. He is secretaiy of the 
Workingmen's Building and Loan Association. 
He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1894, 
and re-elected in 1898, and has had charge of 
the City Police Court since the latter date, 
and has proven a careful and conservative of- 
ficial. Justice Whitconro was married to Miss 
Lizzie Fink in Woisey. South Dakota, and with 
his family, consisting of six children, resides 
a.. No. 210 Laporte avenue. 



JONATHAN MATHEWS. 

Mr. Jonathan Mathews, founder and treas- 
urer of the Mathews Steam Boiler Works 
Company, one of the large and successful en- 
terprises of this city, is a native of England, 
having been born at Manchester in the year 
1840. He was a son of Robert and Miriam 
Mathews, and was educated in his native town, 
after which he learned the trade of ship build- 
ing and boiler making. In his long career, 
prior to 1870, Mr. Mathews worked in the 
leading ship yards of England, and in the 
early sixties worked on the Confederate com- 
merce destroyer "Alabama," which, under the 
command of Captain Semmes, was sunk in 
battle off the harbor of Cherbourg, France, in 
1S64, by the Yankee cruiser "Kearsarge," and 
he also worked upon the "Warrior" and "Black 
Prince." Mr. Mathews tells many interesting 
reminiscences of the famous and historic ves- 
sels which he has helped to build. In 1868 he 
came to America and was employed upon the 
New York Central Railroad, at Albany, and he 
also worked for the Atlantic, at Kent. Ohio, 
now the Erie; and also upon the Michigan Cen- 
tral, at Marshall, Michigan. In 1872 he came 
to South Bend and started in the manufacture 
of steam boilers. His plant, one of the largest 



SOUTH BEND 



193 



of its kind in the country, was destroyed by 
fire in 1892, and he moved to Harvey, Illinois, 
where he engaged in the same line, and where 
he was elected Mayor of the city. In 1897 he 




hardware merchants and tinners, where he 
thoroughly learned the trade of tinsmith, and 
afterward acted as a clerk in their store. In 
1860, in company with several other young 
men from this city, he went to Pike's Peak, 
Colorado, but remained there only a short 
time. On his return trip he worked on the 
roof of the first mint erected in Denver, and 
also worked at Council Bluffs, Iowa. On his 
return to this city he again entered the em- 
ploy of Massey Bros., but from 1861 to 1864 
he was engaged as a clerk in the dry goods 
store of Mr. John Brownfield. In 1864 he 
associated himself in business with Mr. God- 
frey E. Meyer, under the firm name of Meyer & 
Poehlman, and for nearly thirty years this 
firm conducted a large hardware and tinsmith 
business in this city. The firm did the roofing 
and cornice work for most of the prominent 
buildings, churches and residences in South 
Bend, and were the leaders in their line of 
business. The firm was dissolved in 1S93, 
when Mr. Poehlman retired to attend to his 
own private and business interests. He was 
married in 1864 to Miss Anna Katherina Mues- 
sel, daughter of Christopher Muessel, the 
prominent brewer in this city, and has been 



JONATHAN MATHEWS. 

returned to this city and again started in 
business. In 1900 the present company was 
incorporated. Mr. Mathews was married in 
1863 to Miss Louise Gayton, of Stony Strat- 
ford, England. His sons, Robert A. and Fred 
Mathews, are associated with him in the busi- 
ness, the former being president of the com- 
pany and the latter secretary. Mr. Mathews is 
a highly esteemed citizen and business man. 



GOTTFRIED L. POEHLMAN. 

Among those who have been prominently 
connected with the commercial interests and 
growth of this city for nearly half a century 
is Mr. Gottfried Ludwig Poehlman, who is 
well known in this community. Mr. Poehlman 
is a native of Bavaria, and was born at Lorenz- 
reuth, near Arzberg, June 5, 1835. His father, 
Christoph Poehlman, was a successful weaver 
and dyer in that section of the country, and 
his mother was Sabina Poehlman. Mr. Poehl- 
man was educated in his native country, and 
then learned the dyer's trade with his father. 
In 1853 he came to America and located in 
South Bend, which has since been his home. 
For a time he was clerk in a store here, and 
then engaged himself with Massey Bros., 







-■"■:, 



GOTTFRIED L. POEHLMAN. 

associated with the Muessel Brewing Com- 
pany for a number of years. Mr. Poehlman 
was a charter member of the Turn-Verein of 
this city, and is a member of Robert Blum 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. He is still an active business 



194 



SOUTH BEND. 



man, and is highly esteemed in the community. 
His family consists of his estimable wife and 
two daughters. Mis. Hattie Oher, wife of Mr. 
John Ober, and Mrs. Ottila Miller, wife of Mr. 
Homer Miller, and the family residence is at 
No. 123 South St. Joseph street. 



JOHN E. DONOHUE. 
Mr. John B. Donohue, widely known here in 
the retail lumber trade, and a member of the 
Miller & Donohue Lumber Company, whose 
office, yards and planing mills are on South 
Main street and the Lake Shore and Michigan 
Southern Railway, is a native of the city of 
South Bend, and was reared and educated 
here. He is a son of Peter and Bridget Dono- 
hue. As a boy he attended the public schools 
here and completed his education by a thor- 
ough course at Notre Dame. He begun life' 
as a clerk in a store, and later was chief clerk 
of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern 
Railway here. This position he held six years 
and then entered the lumber business. Four 
years he was with the Soutn Bend Lumber 
Company, and he was four years secretary of 
the C. Fassnacht Lumber Company. In July. 
1898, with Mr. Isaiah Miller, he organized 
the Miller & Donohue Lumber Company. The 
plant is a large one. and the company deals in 




JOHN E. DONOHUE. 

all kinds of lumber, lath, shingles, and manu- 
factures and matches lumber, makes sash, 
doors, blinds, etc. The trade is exclusively 
local and very large. Mr. Donohue is an hon- 



orable and piogressive business man of high 
standing and prominence, he was married 
in 1889 to Miss Clara H. Speichert, of this city, 
and resides at No. 745 Vrstula avenue. 



ISAIAH MILLER. 

Mr. Isaiah Miller, of the Miller & Donohue 
Lumber Company, is one of South Bend's 
prominent and successful business men, and 
is a native of the Keystone State, having 




ISAIAH .MILLER. 

been born in Union County, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 17, 1848. He was a son of Jacob Mil- 
ler and Catherine (Ritter), Miller. When he 
was but one year of age his parents removed 
to Northumberland County, where his father 
bought a farm. Young Miller attended the 
public schools and received a portion of his 
education at the Missionary Institute at Set- 
tinsgore, Pennsylvania, and when he had com- 
pleted it, began life as a school teacher, which 
he continued until 1880, when he came to South 
Bend and engaged in the carpenter business. 
In 1891 he was in the contracting business 
under the firm name of Herring & Miller, and 
continued until 1895, when he was alone until 
July 1, 189S, when the Miller & Donohue Lum- 
ber Company was established. This business 
is an extensive one in local trade. The plant, 
situated on South Main street and the Lake 
Shore Railway, is large and comprises lum- 
ber yards, offices, sheds, factory and planing 
mill. The company handles all kinds of lum- 



SOUTH BEND 



195 



ber and manufactures and carries in stock 
a complete line of sash, doors, blinds and build- 
ers' work of all kinds and does a large busi- 
ness. Mr. Miller is nighly esteemed as a suc- 
cessful business man and widely known. He 
was married in 1871 to Miss Verdella Dieffen- 
derfer, a native of Lycoming County, Pennsyl- 
vania, and resides at No. lib Ohio street. 



JOHN I. HOKE. 
Mr. John I. Hoke, president of the Hoke 
Manufacturing Company, was born at Sump- 




vators, and other cultivators and harrows. 
The business gradually increased as the value 
of the products became known, and in 1895 
Mr. Hoke organized the Hoke Manufacturing 
Company, of which he is president and general 
manager, and began the manufacture of rid- 
ing and walking corn cultivators, and spike 
and spring tooth harrows. These products 
are made of malleable iron and steel, and are 
almost indestructible. In 1899 the company 
built its present large plant. Mr. Hoke is a 
business man as well as an inventor of repu- 
tation. He is prominent in social and fra- 
ternal circles. He is a member of the Masons 
and was the first presiding officer here of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He has been 
twice married. His first wife. Miss Nellie 
Rush, of Sumption Prairie, whom he married 
in 1877, died in 1885. Four years later he 
married Miss Emma Bates, of New Carlisle, 
and resides at No. 1011 South Michigan street. 



WILLIAM HOKE. 
Mr. William Hoke, secretary and treasurer 
of the Hoke Manufacturing Company, is a 
native of the Buckeye State, and was born 
July 19, 1893. His father was Emanuel Hoke, 
who came of sturdy Pennsylvania Dutch stock, 
and his mother Magdelena (Jamison) Hoke. 



joriN I. HOKE. 

tion Praiiie, St. Joseph County. Indiana, on 
July 4, 1857. He comes of a pioneer family, 
his father, William Hoke, now associated with 
him in business, was a successful farmer and 
saw mill owner for many years. His mother 
was Margaret (Card) Hoke, now deceased. Mr. 
Hoke received his education in the common 
schools at Sumption Prairie, and assisted on 
the farm and in the saw mill. He early 
evinced a genius for mechanics, and practical 
farm life led him to invent the patents which 
he now holds for the farm implements which 
his company manufactures. While on the farm 
he perfected and made, after his own ideas, 
a riding and breaking plow that proved both 
piactical and economical. In 1893 he came to 
South Bend and in a small way began the 
manufacture of harrows and cultivators in his 
own name. These were the popular spring 
tooth harrows and the high arch walking culti- 




W1LLIAM HOKE. 

When a boy Mr. Hoke did not enjoy those 
advantages of education that do boys of to- 
day. Hard work and breaking up wild lands 



100 



SOUTH BEND. 



on the edge of civilization made learning a 
rare accomplishment. He attended school 
when possible in the old log school house 
and worked on the farm. When a child his 
parents removed to Eastern Indiana, and in 
1843 moved to St. Joseph County, where Mr. 
Hoke was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
and the saw mill business for many years. 
He lived at Sumption Prairie, and was highly 
esteemed as a successful farmer. In 1897 he 
moved to South Bend and took his present 
interest in the Hoke Manufacturing Company, 
which was organized by his son, Mr. John I. 
Hoke. Mr. Hoke has been twice married. His 
first wife, whom he married in May. 1S55, was 
Miss Margaret Gard. who died in 1SS6. In 
1890 Mr. Hoke married the widow of Mr. 
David Carskaddon. and resides in a pretty 
home on East Elder street. 



REV. FRANCIS M. BANFIL. 

The Rev. Francis Milton Banfil. B. A., the 
able Rector of St. James Episcopal Church of 
South Bend, is a young man of rare mental 
graces and a thorough student. He is a native 
of the Granite State, and was born at Nashua. 
New Hampshire, and received his early educa- 



saehusetts. In the fall of 1887 Father Banfil 
entered Dartmouth College, at Hanover, New 
Hampshire, where he remained four years, 
graduating in the summer of 1891 with the 
degree of B. A. He then spent thiee years in 
theological study and training at the General 
Theological Seminary, at New York City, and 
at the Priory, at Verbank, New York; and also 
at Rutland, Vermont. September 23, 1894, he 
was ordained Deacon by the Rt. Rev. Isaac 
Lee Nicholson, S. T. D., Bishop of Milwaukee, 
in All Saints Cathedral, of that city. He then 
spent one year in missionary work at St. 
Martin's, Broadhead, Wisconsin, and was ad- 
vanced to the priesthood September 22, 1895, 
by the same Bishop, at that place. On Septem- 
ber 26, 1895. he began his duties as Curate at 
St. Stephen's Church, Providence. Rhode 
Island, where he remained until 1899, when he 
resigned to become Rector of St. James Church 
in this city. Since Father Banfil came to South 
Bend he has largely built up the church and 
placed it upon a self sustaining basis. Father 
Banfil is an eloquent divine and possesses a 
charm of manner and beauty of character that 
endear him to all with whom he comes in con- 
tact, regardless of church affiliations. He is 
a young man, who is constantly seeking to 
advance his work, in and out of the church, 
and his future is one of brightest promise. 




-Jf^w -• 



REV. FRANC IS M. UANI-'II.. 

tion in the public schools of that city. Later 
he took up the study of medicine, which he fol- 
lowed three yeais, and then spent two years 
in a classical school at Shelburne Falls, Mas- 



JACOB S. KERNER. 

The name of Jacob S. Kerner has been as- 
sociated with the Fire Department of this city 
tor over a quarter of a century, and has be- 
come a household word in every section of 
South Bend and the vicinity. A man of in- 
domitable energy, of fearless courage and of 
a calm and heroic temperament, he is an ideal 
tire tighter, whom experience has raised to 
the topmost rank in his protession. Mr. Ker- 
ner is a native of Erie, Pennsylvania, and was 
born October 5, 1800. At that time his father 
was engaged in the manufacture of oil cloths, 
but came west when his son was quite young. 
The young man attended the schools in Mish- 
awaka, and was afterwaid apprenticed to the 
blacksmith trade, which he followed for some 
years. His first connection with fire matters 
was in 1875, when but fitteen years old. He 
became attached to the "Young Hoosier No. 
4," which was then a part of the volunteer 
department, then in vogue in this city. He 
was afterward placed in chaige of the cele- 
brated tire brigade at the Studebaker Wagon 
Works, which position he held for two years. 
During this time the brigade entered the prize 



SOUTH BEND, 



197 



contest at Michigan City and carried off the 
first prize from all competitors. Captain 
Kerner and his fire laddies accomplished 
the unheard-of feat of running forty rods, 




thrown from the third floor window and caught 
in the arms of the heroic chief, uninjured. He 
was also instrumental in saving the lives of 
other inmates of the hotel, which, but for his 
quick action and timely aid, must have per- 
ished in the flames. Chief Kerner has under 
his command a force of forty men, who suc- 
cessfully operate six hose carts, a hook and 
ladder track and a chemical engine. Under 
the urgent importunities of the Chief, however, 
the department has been materially increased 
and strengthened. No more popular official 
than Chief Kerner is known in this section of 
the country, and none are more deserving of 
honor than he. He is married to an estimable 
and highly esteemed lady, whose maiden name 
was Maggie Weist, and their handsome and 
cosy home is located on the banks of the old 
St. Joe, at No. 302 Vistula avenue. 



JACOB H. REAMER. 

Mr. Jacob H. Reamer, one of our successful 
men, was born on a farm at North Liberty, 
St. Joseph County, Indiana, October 16, 1850. 
His father, Henry Reamer, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, and his mother, Abigail (Lig- 
gitt) Reamer, a native of the Buckeye State. 



JACOli B. KEHiNER. 

stringing one hundred feet of hose, putting on 
pipe and breaking couplings in thirty-four and 
one-fourth seconds. For this remarkable dis- 
play of their agility they were awarded a 
nickel plated hose cart, and hose, and silver 
trumpet. The paid fire department was or- 
ganized early in 1886, and young Kerner joined 
it in September of that year as Second Assist- 
ant Chief, under Isaac Hutchinson, who was 
then in command of the department. He 
served in this position until 1891, when he was 
made First Assistant Chief, and then retired 
fiom the department in 1894, to engage his 
services with the American Express Company. 
In 1898 he was appointed Chief of the de- 
partment, and has fulfilled the duties of that 
honorable position with rare skill and courage 
up to the present time. He is one of the most 
intrepid firemen in the country, and one of 
the most popular chiefs in the west. His 
management of the department in the contiol 
of conflagrations has won for him the plaudits 
of the entire community and endeared him to 
the hearts of all. At the Hotel Morrison fire, 
which occurred on the morning of June 21, 
1900, Chief Kerner won enduiing distinction 
in saving the life of Robbie Smith, an infant, 
whose parents were injuied in the fire, who was 




I 



JACOB H. HEAMEK. 



Young Reamer attended the country schools, 
and later the Northern Indiana College, and 
at the conclusion of his school days became a 
teacher, and for three years taught school. 



198 



SOUTH BEND 



In 1S72 he came to South Bend and found em- 
ployment as clerk in G. W. Buffum's grocery 
store. Two years later, with his brother-in-law, 
J. E. Williams, he purchased the business, 
which was conducted until 1890 under the style 
ot Reamer & Williams. In that year Mr. 
Reamer sold his interest to Mr. Williams. In 
1885 he helped to oiganize the Sandage Steel 
Skein Company, and was its president until 
August 1, 1900. Mr. Reamer is one of our best 
known business men. He was married in 1874 
to Miss Mabel Williams, of St. Joseph County. 



DR. ERNST T. PROMEN. 

Among the notable acquisitions to the med- 
ical fraternity of this city dining the past 
year must be mentioned Dr. Ernst T. Fromen. 




1)1!. EKNST T. FKOMEN. 

who commenced practice in South Bend in 
June, 1900. Dr. Fromen was born in the city 
of Kalmar, Sweden, September 21, 1S66, and 
his father, William T. Fromen, is a Lieuten- 
ant in the Royal Navy of Sweden. Dr. Fro- 
men was educated in the public and high 
schools of his native city, and then attended 
the Royal University of Lund, where he was 
awarded the degree of B. A., and later the 
Royal College of Stockholm, and studied medi- 
cine in both institutions. In 1892 he came 
to America, and for a time was located in Mil- 
waukee, and in 1S94 he became a student of 
the Milwaukee Medical College and graduated 



from that institution in 1897. Prior to coming 
to this city Dr. Fromen practiced his profes- 
sion for a short time in Cadillac, Michigan, 
and for two years at Ludington, Michigan, 
where he served as City Physician and Health 
Officer for one year. He is an excellent phy- 
sician and surgeon, and has built up an ex- 
tensive practice in this city, where he is 
highly esteemed. Dr. Fromen is a member of 
the St. Joseph County Medical Society. He 
was married in 1898 to Miss Ida Paulson, a 
native of Sweden, and resides at No. 134 
South Scott street, where he also has his of- 
fice. 



SAMUEL BOWMAN. 

There are few men better known or more 
highly honored in St. Joseph County than 
Mr. Samuel Bowman, of tnis city, who is now 
serving his third term as County Commission- 
er. Mr. Bowman is a native of Indiana, and 
was born on a farm in Penn Township, about 
two and one-half miles southeast of this city, 
June 29, 1832. His father was Jacob Bowman, 
a successful farmer, who settled here in an 
early day, and was prominent in the early his- 
tory of the county. His mother was Christina 
(Leer) Bowman. When young Bowman was 
but two years of age his parents removed to 
a farm in Poitage Township, and here he 
lived until he had reached his twenty-fourth 
year. He received his early education in the 
district schools of his native town. In 1857 
he left home and moved on a farm of 120 
acres in Center Township, which he now owns, 
and which for years has been known as the 
Bowman farm, and is to-day one of the most 
productive in St. Joseph County. Heie Mr. 
Bowman resided until 1886, when he gave up 
farming and moved to South Bend, where he 
has since resided, and where he is accounted 
a thoroughly public spirited and progressive 
citizen. Mr. Bowman is a man of high ideals, 
sound judgment and careful business methods 
and is a loyal friend and adviser. He has 
helu many positions of public trust and is 
faithful to every obligation. Mr. Bowman was 
one of the first to go into the Grange organiza- 
tion, and united with the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry in 1874, and for several years was 
master of the St. Joseph Valley Grange. He 
has done much to promote this social and 
fraternal organization, and is now one of its 
most active and progressive members. In 1882 
he was elected County Commissioner and 
served until 1SS5. In 1S96 he was re-elected, 
served three years, and at the expiration of 
his term was again elected to the honored 



SOUTH BEND, 



199 



position which he now ably fills. Mr. Bow- 
man is president of the Farmers' Mutual In- 
surance Company of this county. He was 
seven years a member of the Indiana Live 
Stock Commission, and three years its presi- 







SAMUEL BOWMAN. 

dent. He was also president of the Northern 
Indiana and Southern Michigan Agricultural 
Society, and has done as much as any man to 
promote progressive agriculture. Mr. Bow- 
man was married in 18o7 to Miss Melvina 
v^ebster, only daughter of the late Aaron A. 
Webster, a pioneer settler of this county. 
Mrs. Bowman is a most estimable lady, whose 
benevolent acts have endeared her to all who 
know the charm of her personality. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bowman have two daughters, Mrs. Flor- 
ence F. Shank and Mis. Mary E. Gaskel. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bowman reside at No. 533 South Co- 
lumbia street. 



DR. CALLIE A. RENNOE. 

Dr. Callie A. Rennoe is one of the successful 
and able young physicians of this city, and 
is in the enjoyment of an extensive practice. 
He is a native of Windsor, Canada, and was 
boru in that city, October 7, 1868. When he 
was but three years of age his parents re- 
moved to South Bend, and here the young man 
secured his early education. He attended the 
public schools of this city and graduated fiom 
the high school. Selecting the medical pro- 



fession as his vocation in life, he attended 
Rush Medical College, and graduated from that 
institution in 1892. He then established him- 
self in South Bend, and has been in success- 
ful practice here since that time as a physi- 
cian and surgeon. Dr. Rennoe is a member 
ot the St. Joseph County Medical Society, and 
of the medical staff of Epworth Hospital. He 
also lectures before the Tiaining School for 
Nurses, of that institution, on Surgical Emer 
gencies. He is fraternally associated with the 
Knights of Pythias, and the Knights aud La- 
dies of Columbia, and is the medical examiner 
of the Modern Samaritans of the World. He 
was honored by the Governor by the appoint- 
ment as Assistant Surgeon of the Third Regi- 
ment Indiana National Guards, and takes a 
deep interest in military affairs. In 1900 Dr. 
Rennoe was elected Coroner of St. Joseph 
County, which position he now fills. Dr. Ren- 
noe was married to Miss Josephine Beckwith, 
of White Pigeon, Michigan, who was a teacher 




DR. CALLIE A. RENNOE. 

in the public schools of this city prior to her 
marriage, and his pleasant home is at No. 214 
South William street. 



Mr. 



HARRY A. ENGMAN, JR. 
Harry A. Engman, Jr., vice president 



of the Malleable Steel Range Manufacturing 
Company, of this city, was born in Kansas 



200 



S O U T H~B END. 



City, Missouri. April 22, 1874. His parents 
removed from that city to St. Louis, and later 
to Lexington, Kentucky. Mr. Engman was 
educated in the public and private schools 




HARRY A. ENGMAN, JR. 

and the Kentucky University until 1891, when 
he entered the literary department of the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and 
upon finishing, in 1894, went to New York 
City in the employ of the Wrought Iron Range 
Company, of St. Louis, Missouri, where he 
remained two years. He then returned to St. 
Louis and was connected with the Majestic 
Range Manufacturing Company, of which his 
father was vice president, and remained there 
until he came to South Bend upon the or- 
ganization of the Malleable Steel Range Man- 
ufacturing Company. 



ALBERT MYERS. 

Among the widely known citizens of South 
Bend there is none more highly esteemed 
than Mr. Albert Myers. Mr. Myers is a 
native of Ohio, and was born near Wooster, 
February 4, 1849. His father, Andrew My- 
ers, was a manufacturer of linseed oils, and 
operated oil mills in that section. His mother 
was Mary (Aughey) Myers, his parents be- 
ing natives of Pennsylvania. When Mr. My- 
ers was but a child his parents removed to 
Elkhart County, Indiana, and here he re- 
ceived his education in the public schools, and 



later attended the Edwardsburg Academy, at 
Edwardsburg, Michigan. He next removed to 
Cass County, Michigan, where he was engaged 
in farming for eight years. In 1S73 he came 
to South Bend and engaged in the wholesale 
and retail business with Mr. James H. George, 
under the style of Myers & George. This 
partnership continued about three years, 
when Mr. Myers bought out his partner and 
continued the business alone for twelve years. 
During this time he was also engaged in the 
live stock business in the west, and shipped 
cattle to all parts of the country. He next 
organized the Keasey Pulley Company, of 
Mishawaka, and manufactured pulleys for one 
year, after which time he sold the business to 
a Toledo, Ohio, company. In 1S90 he organ- 
ized the South Bend Pulley Company, and 
was its superintendent for seven years, since 
which time he has been engaged in the real 
estate business. Mr. Myers was a prime 
mover in the River "View Cemetery Associa- 
tion, and is a director and its superintendent. 
When this charming cemetery is completed 
it will be one of the most beautiful 
in the country. Mr. Myers is a thor- 
ough and progressive business man. In 
1892 he erected the handsome Myers build- 
ing at the coiner of South Michigan and 




ALBERT MYERS. 

Wayne streets. He was married in 1875 to 
Miss Julia Keasey, the youngest daughter of 
Joseph Keasey, an old and respected citizen 
of South Bend, and has two daughters, Eliza- 



SOUTH BEND 



201 



beth, now Mrs. John B. Campbell, of this 
city, and Leni, and resides at No. 411 South 
Main street. He is a member of the Commer- 
cial-Athletic Club. 



ALBERT M. HARRIS. 

Mr. Albert M. Harris, the inventor of the 
celebrated Harris Spark Arrester, and the 
treasurer and general manager of the South 




ALBERT M. HARRIS. 

Bend Spark Arrester Company, was born near 
this city, in St. Joseph County, September 30, 
1850. He is the son of James and Mary (Fun- 
ston) Harris, and his father was a successful 
farmer. He attended the public schools of 
South Bend, and afterward learned the tin- 
ner's trade, at which he was practically en- 
gaged until 1886, when he invented and manu- 
factured the spark arrester which bears his 
name. In 1889 the present company was 
organized and Mr. Harris became its treasurer 
and general manager. He is a piactical and 
progressive business man, and the value of 
his invention is recognized by mill owneis 
over the entire country. He was married in 
1882 to Miss Blva Lontz, who died in 1893, 
and his present estimable wife was Miss Mag- 
gie Holland, of Plymouth, Indiana, to whom 
he was married in 1896. His son, J. A. Harris, 
is first vice president of the company. Mr. 
Harris resides at No. 108o Vistula avenue. 



WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY. 

Mr. William H. Kingsley, president of the 
South Bend Spark Arrester Company, is a 
native of New York, and was born in War- 
saw, in that state, March 19, 1853. He is a 
son of H. J. and Lydia (Osborn) Kingsley, 
and his father was " a farmer. In 1857 Mr. 
Kingsley came to South Bend with his parents 
and attended the public schools, and in 1861 
he removed to Dayton, Michigan, and lived 
on a farm until 1876, when he went to Rice- 
ville, Iowa, and for three years drove stage 
from that place to Osage. After this he re- 
moved to Niles, Michigan, and entered the 
employ of the Michigan Central Railroad Com- 
pany. In 1882 he met with an accident and 
lost part of his foot, when he removed to Jack- 
son, in the employ of the same company, and 
remained there until 1S85, when he removed 
to this city. He engaged in the retail grocery 
business with his father, under the firm name 
of H. J. Kingsley & Son, and in 1889 he was 
associated with Mr. A. M. Harris in the or- 
ganization and incorporation of the South 




WILLIAM II. KINGSLEY. 

Bend Spark Arrester Company, and was 
made its president and secretary, which posi- 
tion he now holds. Mr. Kingsley is a genial 
gentleman, a practical business man, and is 
highly esteemed. He was married to Miss 
Myrtie E. Russell, a native of Michigan, and 
with his family resides at No. 517 East Pris- 
cilla street. 



202 



SOUTH BEND 



FREDERICK W. MUELLER. 
Mr. Frederick VV. Mueller, the well known 
retail giocer, at the corner of South Michi- 
gan and Jefferson streets, is the eldest son 
of five children born to John M. Mueller and 




JACOB E. HENRY. 

Mr. Jacob E. Henry is one of the young, 
ambitious and enterprising business men of 
South Bend, and has been engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business here for 
several years. Mr. Heniy was born in North 
Industry. Stark County, Ohio December 13. 
1863. His early education was acquired in the 
schools of Whitley County, Indiana. Later 
he attended the Ohio State Normal School, at 
Ada, Ohio, where he graduated in 1889. Mr. 
Henry began business in Middleborough. Ken- 
tucky, where he was remarkably successful. 
He then removed to Canton. Ohio, and after- 
ward was located in Chicago. Appreciating 
the advantages of South Bend, Mr. Henry 
decided to come here, and in 1893 he estab- 
lished himself in this city, where he has built 
up a large and remunerative business. Mr. 
Henry is also extensively engaged in the 
insurance business, and is the agent for the 
Allemania, of Pittsburg, and the New York, 
of New York City. He is also an expert in 
loan investigations and the St. Joseph County 
Loan and Savings Association accepts his 
judgment as to the value of all properties on 



FJiEDEKICK \V. MUELLEH. 

Elizabeth B. (Meyer) Mueller, both natives of 
Bavaria, Germany. Frederick W. Mueller 
was born at Jefferson. Jefferson County, Wis- 
consin, October 2, 1853. He was educated in 
the common schools of his native town, and 
finished his education at the Northwestern 
University, at Watertown. Wisconsin. After 
his school days he learned the trade of a 
harness maker at Jefferson and at De Pere, 
Wisconsin. In 1872 he came to South Bend, 
where he woiked one year at his trade. He 
then entered the employ of Louis Nickel, 
where he remained until 1880, when he re- 
signed his position to engage in business for 
himself, and established the retail grocery he 
now owns. In the past twenty years Mr. Muel- 
ler has built up a large and peimanent patron- 
age that includes many of the leading families 
of the city. His store is large and stock most 
complete. Mr. Mueller is one of the leading 
business man and representative citizens of 
South Bend. He is prominent in the social 
and fraternal life of the city, and is a mem- 
ber of the South Bend Turners Society, the 
Robeit Blum Lodge, No. 287, I. O. O. F., the 
Royal Arcanum, Masons and the A. O. U. W. 
He was married in 1880 to Miss Anna M. Sack, 
of this city. 




JACOB E. IIKNKY. 

\vhi< h loans are negotiated by that institu- 
tion. He is a member of the Commercial- 
Athletic Club, the Modern Woodmen, and an 
officer in the Order of the Knights and Ladies 
of Columbia. On December 27, 1889, he was 



SOUTH BEND 



203 



married to Miss Sarah A. Meek, of North 
Manchester, Wabash County, Indiana, and 
with his family, consisting of an only son, 
he resides in a cosy and luxurious home at 
No. 1036 Colfax avenue. 



WILLIAM B. WRIGHT. 

Mr. William B. Wright has been engaged in 
the real estate, law and collection business 
in this city for a number of years, and is well 



lection business, and is the local agent of the 
Manhattan Fire Insurance Company, of New 
York. He is an energetic business man and 
a capable attorney. Mr. Wright served his 
country in the civil war, and enlisted in the 
Ninetieth New York Regiment, which was a 
part of the First Brigade of the First Division 
of the Nineteenth Army Corps. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masons, a Knight Templar, Macca- 
bee, and a member of the Knights and Ladies 
ot Columbia. He was marrieu to Miss Annie 
Metzger, of Oswego, New York, and his famiij 
consists of a son, W. J. Wright, and a daugh- 
ter, Dollie May Wright. He resides at No. 734 
Leland avenue. 




WILLIAM I!. WHIOUT, 

known in the community. He is a native of 
New York State, and was born in Orleans 
County, December 29, 1852. His father. Burt- 
ley Wright, was a well known merchant in 
that locality. Mr. Wright received his eariy 
education in the vicinity of his home, and 
for several years worked upon a farm. He 
was afterward engaged with a who.esale shoe 
Arm at Rochester, New York, and for eight 
yeais was in the grocery business in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. In 1884 he came to South Bend 
and engaged in business, and was elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace in 1888, which office he held 
until 1896. He was admitted to the bar dur- 
ing this year, and has since been actively 
engaged in the real estate, law and collection 
business, with an office at No. 220 West Wash- 
ington street. Mr. Wright does an extensive 
business, and is interested in the sale of lots 
in most of the prominent additions and subdi- 
visions in the city. He also aoes a large col- 



D1XON W. PLACE. 

Mr. Dixon W. Place is one of the widely 
known and highly esteemed citizens of South 
Bend, and is a successful business man at 
Walkerton, Indiana. Mr. Place is a native of 
the Buckeye State, and was born at Camden, 
Preble County, Ohio.. September 3, 1850. His 
father, James U. Place, was a successful 
faimer, and his mother was Susan F. (Patton) 
Place, both being natives of Ohio. When Mr. 
Place was an infant his parents removed to 
Cass County, Indiana, where his lather en- 
gaged in farming. Young Place was reared 
on the farm, and received his education in 
the district schools in the vicinity of his home. 
In 1866 his parents removed to New Waverly ; 
where he also attended the district school. 
He completed his education at the high school 
in Peru, Indiana, and then taught school in 
the district schools for a number of years 
In 1881 he moved to Walkerton. Indiana, 
where he resided with his family until 1891, 
when he removed to this city, where he has 
since resided. But he has continued his busi- 
ness in Walkerton. In 1891 he organized the 
South Bend Implement Company, which was 
successfully engaged in the agricultural im- 
plement business until 1894. During this 
time Mr. Place was also engaged in the whole- 
sale hay trade at Walkerton, St. Joseph Coun- 
ty, and when the business of the South Bend 
Implement Company was closed out, Mr. 
Place went to Walkerton and gave his whole 
attention to the wholesale hay business. In 
1895 he added the agricultural implement busi- 
ness, and does a large trade. Mr. Place re- 
sides in this city, and is a man of prominence 
and high business and social standing. He is 
a progressive and public spirited citizen. Mr. 
Place was elected County Commissioner and 
served in that office from December 1, 1885, 



204 



SOUTH BEND. 



to December 1, 1S91. During his term as Com- 
missioner Mr. Place was impressed with the 
lack of system in dispensing the charitable 
funds by the County Commissioners and Trus- 
tees of the State, and he issued a call for a 




ana. The young man received his education 
in the public schools of Middlebury. Indiana, 
and after graduating from the high school he 
attended the State Normal School at Valpa- 
raiso. After this he taught school for about 
five years, and then read law in the office of 
Messrs. Dodge & Dodge, a law firm of Elkhart, 
Indiana, and was admitted to the bar in that 
county in 1892. On September 1. 1894, he came 
to South Bend, and at once established him- 
self in general practice, at which he has been 
most successful. His offices are located at 
the northeast corner of Main and Washington 
streets. Mr. Kurtz from his early boyhood 
has been an indefatigable worker, and has 
won his present position in the community 
and in his profession by his own sturdy and 
unaided efforts. He is forceful and self-reli- 
ant and well grounded in the law and in the 
practice of the courts, and is popular with 
the bench and the bar. Mr. Kurtz takes an 
active interest in public and political affairs, 
and is a forcible and convincing speaker 
whose services are in great demand by his 
party managers. He is a member of the Ma- 



DIXON W. PLACE. 

meeting of the County Commissioners and 
Township Trustees of Indiana for the purpose 
of adopting a uniform system of relief for 
dependents, and was chosen president of the 
meeting, which was held in the Capitol build- 
ing at Indianapolis in October, 1891. At this 
meeting a State Association of Commissioneis 
and Trustees was organized, and much prac- 
tical good has been accomplished. He is a 
member of South Bend Lodge, No. 294, F. & 
A. M., the Maccabees, Royal Arcanum, Knights 
of Pythias, and the St. Joseph Valley Grange. 
He was married March 2, 1873, to Miss Emma 
M. La Tourrette, of Cass County, and with his 
estimable wife and three daughters, Edna M., 
Mabel B. and Frances Marie, resides at No. 
226 South Lafayette street. 




GEORGE A. KURTZ. 
Mr. George A. Kurtz, a young and successful 
member of the bar of this county, was born at 
Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, July 7, 1866. 
He is the son of John and Sarah (McGary) 
Kurtz, and when he was but ten months old 
his parents removed to Elkhart County, Indi- 



GEORGE A. KUKTZ. 



sons and the K. O. T. M., and has hosts of 
friends in this city. He was married to Miss 
Ida M. Calvert on May 3, 1897, and resides at 
No. 225 Studebaker street. 



SOUTH BEND. 



205 



WILLIAM E. GELTZ. 

Mr. William E. Geltz, the well known real 
estate dealer and insurance agent, is a native 
of South Bend, and was born June 6, 1867. 
His father, George Geltz, was one of the 



*%■ 




WILLIAM E. GELTZ. 

pioneers of this section, who came west in 
1847 and built a log house, cutting the timber 
himself. He was afterward engaged with the 
Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing Company for 
twenty-five years, when he retired from active 
business. The son received his education in 
the public and high schools of this city and 
afterward took a course at the South Bend 
Business College. He was then engaged as 
a clerk in the clothing store of E. S. Peck, 
and afterward in the hat store of M. J. Frank- 
el, where he remained twelve years. In 1S96 
he engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business, at which he has been quite success- 
ful. He is now associated in business with 
Mr. Virginius Nicar, at No. 120 North Michi- 
gan street. Mr. Geltz is the local agent for 
the Netherlands Fire Insurance Company, the 
Manchester of England, the American of New 
York, the Milwaukee Fire Insurance Company 
and the Traders and Travelers Accident In- 
surance Company. For the past four years 
he has been connected with the Township 
Assessor's office, and is fully conversant with 
real estate values in South Bend and Portage 
Township, and in 1900 was nominated as the 
Republican candidate for County Assessor of 
St. Joseph County and elected in November. 



He is a member of the Commercial-Athletic 
Club, the Per-Se Club, the Turn-Verein, the 
Modern Samaritans and the W. O. W. He is 
an energetic business man, and popular. He 
was married to Miss Frances M. Keller, of 
Mishawaka, and resides with his two children 
at No. S47 Forest avenue, in Chapin Park. 



CHARLES E. M'CARTY. 

Mr. Charles E. McCarty, the present effi- 
cient Sheriff of St. Joseph County, is a gen- 
tleman of executive ability, an excellent disci- 
plinarian and of unquestioned courage. As 
Sheriff of this county he has proven himself 
to be in every way worthy of the trust and 
confidence reposed in him by the citizens of 
this judicial district. Mr. McCarty was born 
in Hillsdale, Michigan, November 16, 1S50. 
and his father. Morgan McCarty, was the pro- 
prietor of a hotel at that place. When he 
was but three years of age his parents re- 
moved to Plymouth, Marshall County. Indiana, 
and afterward located in Lincoln Township, 
St. Joseph County. Here the young man was 
educated in the district schools and assisted 
his father on the farm until he was sixteen 
years of age, when he engaged in the railroad 
business, which he successfully followed for 




CHAELES E. M CAKTT. 



twenty-five years. During this time he was 
engaged as conductor on the Baltimore and 
Ohio road, the Wabash system, the Santa Fe, 
the Nickel Plate and the Louisville and Nash- 



21 G 



SOUTH BEND. 



ville roans. Tiring finally of railroad life. 
he purchased a farm in Lincoln Township and 
again became an agriculturist, and while there 
was elected by the Republicans of Lincoln 
Township as Assessor. For one year Mr. Mc- 
Carty was proprietor of the popular hostelry 
at Walkerton Junction. He was elected 
Sheriff of St. Joseph County in 1898. and has 
proven himself a valuable civil officer. At the 
time of his election he was the Township 
Assessor of Lincoin Township, and popular 
with the entire community. During his term 
of office he has performed the delicate and 
important duties of that position with rare 
tact and ability and is recognized as an in- 
trepid and conscientious officer of the law. 
In 1900, having received the unanimous nomi- 
nation of n s party, ne was re-elected She: iff. 
As Sheriff he has had charge of a number of 
important criminals, and has managed the of- 
fice ana the jail in a manner to win the ap- 
probation of all. The State Inspector of Char- 
itable Institutions gives Sheriff McCarty the 
high praise of having, the best conducted and 
best sanitary jail in the state. Sheriff Mc- 
Carty is a man or fine physique, an excellent 
judge of human nature and is unflinching in 
the pe;formance of his duties. In social life 
he is generous, courteous and hospitable, and 
has endeared himself to hosts of friends. He 
was married to Miss Melissa Hardy, of Lin- 
coln Township, and has one son. Harley Mc- 
Carty, who is the popular turnkey of the 
County Jail, and his father's able assistant, 
bheriff McCarty now resides in the commo- 
dious residence in connection with the jail. 
and is still interested in the hotel at Wa ker- 
ton. 



GEORGE H. WHEELOCK. 

The extensive establishment of George H. 
Whee'.ock & Co. located at IV os. 113 and 115 
West Washington street, is a striking example 
of the advancing public taste for the beautiful 
and artistic. Mr. George H. Wheelock, the 
proprietor, is a native of Wisconsin, and was 
born in Janesville, January 4, 1864. His father, 
\V. G. Wheelock, was engaged in the china 
and g assware business in that city for forty- 
five years. In 1S82 Mr. Wheelock came to 
South Bend and engaged with his brother, C. 
E. Wheelock. in his present business, which 
had been established thirty years ago by J. 
M. Pool. In 1886 he purchased his brother's 
interest and has since conducted it alone. Mr. 
Wheelock is a direct importer and wholesale 
and retail dealer in art pottery, fine china 
anu cut g assware of the highest order, and 



cariies an extensive stock of all grades of 
china, glassware and lamps for hotel and 
household uses. His wholesale trade extends 
tluoughout the states of Indiana. Michigan 
and Ohio. In addition to his large and in- 
creasing wholesale business, Mr. Wheelock 
also has an extensive retail trade, which em- 
braces South Bend and the surrounding coun- 
try. He is a leader in his business, and gives 
his entire attention to its management. He 
also carries an extensive line of gas and elec- 
tric fixtures of the latest pattern, and has 
furnished the handsome fixtures for the Coun- 
ty Court House, the Public library, the Oliver 
Hotel, the St. Joseph County Savings Bank. 




GEORGE H. WHEELOCK. 

and a number of other buildings and resi- 
dences in this city. Mr. Wheelock is an active 
and progressive merchant, is a Governor of 
the Indiana Club, an Odd Fellow, and a mem- 
ber of a number of fraternal insurance orders, 
rie was married to Miss Belle Cassoday. a 
daughter of Chief Justice Cassoday, of the 
Supreme Court of Wisconsin, and his family 
consists of a son, Harry E. Wheelock, and a 
daughter. Joan. His borne is located at No. 
410 West Wayne street. 



FRANK C. TOEPP. 

Mr. Frank C. Toepp has for years been rec- 
ognized as the leading jeweler in this city, 
and his handsome store at the northeast cor- 
ner of Main and Washington stieets has be- 



SOUTH BEND 



207 



come one of the popular institutions of the 
city. Mr. Toepp is a native of New York, 
and was born in that state December 29, 1865. 
He received his early education in that city, 




K11AXK ('. TOEPP. 

and in 1880, when he was fourteen years of 
age, his father, Peter Toepp, now retired, le- 
moved to South Bend. Here his father was 
first engaged in the dry goods business with 
his sons, William and P. Henry, under the 
style of Peter Toepp & Sons, and later he 
was connected with the firm of Toepp & 
uoetz, in the wood, coal and feed business. 
After finishing his education, Mr. Toepp was 
apprenticed to the jewelry business and thor- 
oughly learned the practical details of that 
artistic trade, and finished in Toledo, Ohio, 
in 1886-1887. In 1888 ne established himself 
in the jewelry Dusiness in this city on a 
moderate scale, and m 1890, in partnership 
with his father, he purchased the business of 
Mr. Ed. Buysse, at his present location. The 
firm was known as F. C. Toepp & Co., and at 
once became prominent in the mercantile 
community. The business was continued with 
increasing success until 1896, when Mr. Frank 
C. Toepp purchased the interest of his father 
and assumed full control. His handsomely 
appointed store contains an extensive stock 
of fine jewelry, diamonds, watches, silverware 
and fancy goods, all of the latest styles and 
of the finest qualities, and his patrons are 
among the leading citizens of South Bend and 



vicinity. Mr. Toepp has justly earned de- 
served success, and his unimpeachable char- 
acter in business is recognized by all. He is 
an energetic business man of the progressive 
type, and is popular in the community. He is 
a member of the Commercial-Athietic Club, 
the B. P. O. E., and the Merchants' Associa- 
tion. He was married to Miss Johanna Kamm, 
the accomp ished daughter of Mr. Adolph 
Kamm, the prominent brewer of Mishawaka, 
and with his charming wife resides in his 
handsome new home at No. 525 West Wash- 
ington street. 



ROBIN E. DUNBAR. 

Mr. Robin E. Dunbar ranks deservedly high 
among the legal fraternity, and is a worthy 
descendent of his honored father, Alvin S. 
Dunbar, who died in 1897, and who, for forty- 
five yea:s, was an able practitioner at the bar 
of St. Joseph County. Mr. Dunbar was born 
in South Bend, March 13, 1868, and received 
his education in the public schools and high 
school of this city. After one year's attend- 
ance at Cook Academy, at Havana, New York, 
he took a lour years' course in the Literary 
Department of the University of Michigan, 
and graduated with the degree of Ph. B. in 




ROBIN E. DUNBAR. 

1890. In pursuing his law studies he attended 
Du Paw University, the University of Michi- 
gan, and graduated at Notie Dame in 1891. 



20S 



SOUTH BKND, 



He was admitted to the bar during this year 
and commenced the practice ot law with his 
father, under the firm name of Dunbar & Dun- 
bar. This association continued until 1897, 
when the death of Mr. Alvin S. Dunbar oc- 
curred, and since that time Mr. R. E. Dunbar 
has managed the business. He is a lawyer of 
general practice, but devotes the major portion 
of his time to probate practice, in the settle- 
ment of estates and management of guardian- 
ships. He is a careful and conscientious at- 
torney, well grounded in the law, and enjoys 
the confidence and esteem of the community. 
He has been identified with many of the more 
prominent causes tried before the courts of 
this circuit, and conducted the defense of 
Edwards and his youthful partner, who were 
accused of the shooting of Officer Derrant a 
few years ago, and practically acquitted them. 
Mr. Dunbar is a member of the Odd Fellows, 
the Commercial-Athletic Club, and is the Ex- 
alted Ruler of the local Lodge of Elks. He 
was married to Miss Blanche Stover, of Mar- 
seilles, Illinois, and with his family of two 
children resides at No. 1253 Vistula avenue. 



DR. EDGAR P. BORLEY. 

Dr. Edgar P. Borley, a rising and successful 
young physician of this city, has already firmly 




March 6, 1871. His father, William E. Borley, 
who is now living, was a prosperous agricul- 
turist. Dr. Borley received his early educa- 
tion in the schools of his native town, and the 
London High School. He afterward took a 
full course in the Detroit College of Phar- 
macy and graduated in 1S94. During this term 
he was connected with the drug business in 
that city, and for several years was a prac- 
tical and expert pharmacist. In 1894 Dr. Bor- 
ley took the examinations of the State Board 
of Pharmacy and passed with high honors. 
In the drug business Dr. Borley was connected 
with the largest manufacturing and wholesale 
houses in Detroit. including Frederick 
Stearnes & Co., Williams, Davis, Brooks & 
Co.. and others. His medical education was 
acquired at the Detroit College of Medicine, 
and he graduated with honor from that insti- 
tution in 189S. During the last year of his 
college course, and for a year after his gradua- 
tion, he was officially connected with the Har- 
per Hospital at Detroit, both as externe and 
interne physician, where he gained a vast 
amount of valuable experience and evinced 
marked professional skill. His brother, Dr. 
W. E. Borley, being located in Mishawaka, 
the young physician decided to come to Indi- 
ana, and located in South Bend, in May, 1899. 
Careful and conscientious, and fully equipped 
for his impoitant and responsible profession, 
Dr. Borley has achieved a deserved success 
as a physician and surgeon, and his patients 
are among the leading families of the city. 
Dr. Borley is the attending physician and sur- 
geon at the Epworth Hospital, and to the 
Northern Indiana Orphan Asylum. He is also 
a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion and the Indiana State and the St. Joseph 
County Medical Societies. His handsome offi- 
ces and reception rooms are located in the 
Kiser & Woolverton building, at the corner 
of Lafayette and Washington streets. Dr. Bor- 
ley is a bachelor and extremely popular in the 
community. 



DR. EDGAR P. HORLEY. 

established himself in the esteem and confi- 
dence of the community. Dr. Borley is a 
native of London, Ontario, and was born 



WILBUR H. BARKER. 

Mr. Wilbur H. Barker, the widely known 
grain shipper, and proprietor of the feed mill 
at No. 611 South Latayette street, is a native 
of the Peninsular State, and was born at 
Hillsdale, Michigan, June 8, 1845. His father, 
Mr. Loring S. Barker, was a farmer in that 
section, and his mother was Sophia (Morrill) 
Barker. Both of his paients came of promi- 
nent families in New York State. Young 
Barker was born on the family farm, and was 
educated in the country schools in that sec- 



SOUTH BEND. 



209 



tion and imbued all of those sturdy chaiacter- 
istics of tne honest farmer boy. When he 
had completed his education he learned teieg- 
rapny and started in life in the railroad busi- 





County. Mr. Orr is an attorney of long ex- 
peiience and of unquestioned ability, and his 
clients are among the p.ominent business cor- 
porations and citizens of South Bend. He was 
born in Laporte County, November 24, 1860, 
and his father, Henry Foster Orr, was a pros- 
perous farmer in that section of the state. 
After attending the public schools in Laporte 
he was sent to the Michigan University, at 
Ann Arbor, where he graduated with honors 
in 1881. He was admitted to the bar during 
the year, and in November, 1884, he estab- 
lished himself in business in this city, and has 
been successful in building up an extensive 
practice and in gaining professional distinc- 
tion in many important cases. He acted as 
Prosecuting Attomey from 1889 to 1891, and 
in 1893-1894 he was the attorney for the City 
of South Bend. In the Town of Myler case, 
and in the Carskaddon City Hall site case, 
he was successful in obtaining favorable de- 
cisions for his clients, and he has been promi- 
nently identified with many of the more im- 
portant cases to which the city was a party, 
and is regarded as one of the best grounded 
attorneys on corporation law now practicing 



WILEER H. BAIiKEl;. 

ness. For eighteen years he was in the em- 
ploy of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern 
liaiiway as station agent at Allen's Station, 
Chesterton and Warren Station. Whi.e in the 
employ of the company at the latter place 
Mr. Barker began buying and selling grain, 
and in 1891 he resigned his position to devote 
his entire time to his rapidly growing busi- 
ness. He came to South Bend and started 
his feed mill, where he does a laige business. 
He has a grain elevator at Warren Station, 
and one at Mishawaka, and ships grain in 
carload lots to merchant millers in the east. 
He deals very largely in Minnesota flour of 
the best brands and handles on an average 
300 barrels a month to the retail merchants 
of this section. Mr. Barker does a large busi- 
ness, and is a business man of the strictest 
integrity and ability. He was married in 1875 
to Miss Emeline Miknen, of this city, and 
lesides at No. 619 West Water street. 




JOSEPH G. ORR. 



JOSEPH G. ORR. 

Mr. Joseph G. Orr, who is now associated 
with ex-Judge T. E. Howard, under the firm 
name of Howard & Orr, is one of the success- 
ful practitioners at the bar of St. Joseph 



in the courts of Indiana. He was married 
to Miss Theresa Brennan, has an interesting 
family of two children, and occupies a hand- 
some home in Oakland Park. 



210 



SOUTH BEND 



THEO. BLAKE. 

In the long list of names that stand for 
commercial success and business honor iu 
South Bend, that of Theo. Blake, the well 




is large and well fitted, and he carries a 
complete stock of staple and fancy groceries. 
Mr. B:ake is a business man of integrity, and 
public spirited, and is esteemed by all. He 
has been twice married. In 1874 he was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary E. Scott, who died in 1876. 
Three years later he was married to Miss 
Evangeline Rutherford, and with his estimable 
wife resides at No. 216 West Wayne street. 
Mr. Blake is popular in social circles, and is a 
member of the Royal Arcanum and the Frater- 
nal Mystic Circle. 



JOHN C. CLEIS. 

Mr. John Charles Cleis, who is recognized 
as a leading jeweler in South Bend, is a native 
of the Buckeye State, and was born at Canton, 
Starke County, Ohio. October 21. 1855. His 
father. Dr. George Cleis. was an eminent prac- 
ticing physician, and his mother was Catherine 
(Kaercher) Cleis. When he was a child his 
paients removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
the home of his mother, and remained there 
until 1S67. Young Cleis was educated in the 
schools there, and when his parents removed 
to Goshen, Indiana, in 1867, he completed his 



THEO. BLAKE. 

known grocer at No. 219 South Michigan 
street, takes a leading place. Mr. Blake was 
born in Berrian County, Michigan, May 24, 
1851. His father, Charles Blake, was a suc- 
cessful farmer and veterinary surgeon, and 
his mother was Mary E. (Brown) Blake. As 
a boy young Blake attended the district 
schools in his native county, and when he 
was fourteen years of age his parents removed 
to Buchanan, Michigan, where he lived until 
he was twenty-four years of age. When he 
had finished his schooling he engaged in the 
teaming business, and in 1875 he removed to 
Clay Township, St. Joseph County. Indiana, 
where he was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits for two years. In 1877 he came to South 
Bend, where he has since resided. He was 
engaged with the Singer Manufacturing Com- 
pany for eighteen months, and the;i started 
hi the retail grocery business as a member 
of the fiim of J. V. Rutherford & Co., where 
he remained eleven years, when he started 
in business alone on East Jefferson street. 
He remained in that location one year, when 
he removed to the Hackney corner, and then 
to the Adam Baer building, and in November, 
1900, moved to his present excellent location. 
No. 219 South Michigan street. His store 





.lOIIN C. CLEIS. 



education in the public and high schools of 
that city. In 1871 Mr. Cieis came to South 
Bend and entered the jewelry store of Ed. 
Buysee, where he remained eleven years, and 



SOUTH BEND 



211 



thoroughly learned the practical details of 
the artistic trade. In 1SS2 he established 
himself in the jewelry business at No. 105 
North Michigan street, where George Wy- 
man & Co.'s handsome store is now lo- 
cated, and at once became prominent in 
the mercantile community. In 1893 Mr. 
Cleis removed to his present location, No. 105 
South Michigan street, where he has a finely 
appointed store, and carries an extensive 
stock of fine watches, jewelry, diamonds, sil- 
verware and fancy goods ot the latest styles 
and the finest qualities, and his patrons are 
among the leading citizens of South Bend and 
vicinity. Mr. Cleis has justly earned his suc- 
cess, and his integrity in business is recog- 
nized by all. He makes a specialty of fine 
repairing of all kinds and enjoys a large trade. 
Mr. Cleis is a business man of the progressive 
type and is popular in the community. He 
was married in 1880 to Miss Mary Ellen Yoder, 
of this city, and has three children, Everett 
and Ethel, twins, sixteen years of age. and 
Marie, twelve years of age. Mr. Cleis resides 
in a pretty home at No. 114 East Marion 
street. 



HENRY G. CHRISTMAN. 

By careful and conscientious work, and by 
strict attention to every cietail of his exten- 
sive business, Mr. Henry G. Christman, the 
well known and successful contractor and 
builder, has won an enviable reputation in 
this community. Mr. Christman is a native 
of this city, and was born February IS, 1869. 
He is the son of Mr. Henry Christman, who was 
well known in this locality. Mr. Christman at- 
tended the public schools, and when he was 
but thirteen yea: s of age he engaged in the 
teaming business until he was eighteen. He 
then engaged himself to Mr. C. Fassnacht, 
with whom he thoroughly learned the trade 
of a carpenter, and the essentials of the con- 
tracting business. He remained with Mr. 
Fassnacht until 1894, when he decided to com- 
mence business for himself, and he has been 
remarkably successful from the outset. When 
he commenced business he was practically 
without capita], but by his own efforts he has 
forged to the front and is to-day the leading 
contractor and builder in South Bend. During 
this time he has been engaged in the erec- 
tion of the St. James Episcopal Church, St. 
Patrick's School, the Indiana Club building, 
the new Laurel School, Arnold's handsome new 
building, Mrs. P. E. Studebaker's residence, 
Mr. George Whitmer's residence, the addition 
to the Linden School, the Mills Bros, ware- 



house, the interior work of the Auditorium 
and Annex, the new Dean building, and a large 
number of handsome residences in this city. 
Mr. Christman also put in the mason and iron 
work tor the Epworth Hospital, and has been 
awarded the contiact, over all competitors, 
for the erection of the new City Hall, which 
will be a model of modern architecture, and 
one of the handsomest buildings in the city. 
This is the largest building contract ever let 
to a South Bend contractor. Mr. Christman 
is a thorough master o'f his business, and 
may be said to have been connected with the 
building interests of the city since he was a 
boy fifteen years old. He is prompt, reliable 




HENRY G. CHRISTMAN. 

and energetic, and a contract entered into by 
him is sure to be fulfilled to the letter. By 
his straightforward methods he has won hosts 
of triends, and none stand higher in the esteem 
of the community than Mr. Henry G. Christ- 
man. He is a member of the Commercial- 
Athletic Club. Mr. Christman was married 
to Miss Minnie Haslinger, of this city, and 
with his estimable wife and two children re- 
sides at No. 533 Noith dishing street. 



DR. RICHARD B. DUGDALE. 

Dr. Richard Benson Dugdale has been iden- 
tified with the Coroner's office of St. Joseph 
County since 1S94, and his conduct of that im- 
portant and responsible office has won for 



212 



SOUTH BEND. 



him the enconiums of the entire community. 
Under the laws of Indiana the Coroner does 
not empanel a jury to share the responsibility 
of the chief official in the investigation of a 



f*^ 




i 



DR. RICHARD B DUGDALE. 

murder or suicide, but he must hear all the 
testimony in the case, and upon his judgment 
and finding the officers of the law are guided 
and governed. Dr. Dugdale. though yet a com- 
paratively young man. has had several years 
of valuable experience, which have been of 
great service to him, both in the practice of 
his profession and in the management of his 
office. He is a native of South Bend, and 
was born in this city September 17, 186S, his 
father being Thomas Dugdale, who is well 
known and esteemed in this community. He 
attended the public schools here, and after- 
waid took a thorough course in medicine at 
the Rush Medical College, in the City of Chi- 
cago. He graduated in 1S92, and for three 
years afterward he located in North Liberty, 
where he practiced his profession, and then 
came to Scuth Bend in 1895, where he has 
resided ever since. In 1S94 he was elected 
Coroner, and has ably filled the duties of 
this exacting office up to the present time, 
and has been three times elected by the voters 
of the county. In addition to his official and 
professional duties Dr. Dugdale is one of the 
attending physicians at the Epworth Hospital, 
and the Training School for Nurses, and is 
a lecturer on Anesthetics and Urinalysis of 



recognized ability. Owing to the increase in 
his personal practice. Dr. Dugdale has decided 
to relinquish his official position, and at the 
end of the present term will give up the Cor- 
onership. In 1893 Dr. Dugdale was married 
to Miss Fanny Bungay, of Constantine, Michi- 
gan, and his home is at No. 726 East Wash- 
ington street. 



GEORGE T. HODSON. 

For nearly half a century Mr. George T. 
Hodson has been prominently identified with 
the material growth and industrial interests 
of this city, and is well known in this com- 
munity. He is a native of New Jersey, and 
was born in the city of Burlington, in that 
state, March 28, 1S34. He is a son of George 
Hodson and Harriet (Gaskell) Hodson, both of 
whom were natives of Burangton County, and 
were esteemed residents of that locality. After 
attending the public schools at Buriington he 
was apprenticed to the carpenter trade, and 
came to South Bend in June, 1855, but only 
remained a few months, when he returned 
home. On December 24, 1855, he was married 
to Miss Fannie Hillier, of Burlington, and in 
March. 1856, with his young wife, came back 




GEORGE T. HODSOX. 

to South Bend, where he has since resided and 
been actively engaged m business. For sev- 
eral years Mr. Hodson and his brother, Charles 
G. Hodson, were engaged in the carpenter and 



SOUTH BEND. 



213 



contracting business, during which time they 
erected the old St. Patrick's Church, on Di- 
vision street, and several buildings at Notie 
Dame and St. Mary s, besides a number of 
other buildings in the city. Later he was 
connected with the Eag.e Manufacturing Com- 
pany, manufacturers of sash, doors and b inds, 
whose mil.s were located in the west race 
at the foot of Washington street, and Mr. 
Hodson was the superintendent. In 1876, in 
connection with his brother, he purchased the 
interests of the company, and under the fiini 
name of G. T. Hodson & Co. conducted the 
business for about five years, when the build- 
ing was destroyed oy fire. The mill was re- 
built and Mr. E. P. Stanfield was connected 
with the business, which was conducted under 
the firm name of Hodson, Stanfield & Co., 
until 18tf5, when Mr. Hodson withdrew. Since 
that time he has been engaged in the sale of 
sash, doors and blinds to the local t ade for 
a prominent western manufactory. Mr. Hod- 
son has been a most active business man of 
the progressive type, and has achieved a well 
deserved success. He has been piominently 
connected with the First Baptist Church of 
this city since 1851, and holds the office of 
deacon. He has also been an active member 
of the Young Men's Christian Association since 
its organization, and is one of its directors. 
Mr. Hodson's family consists of his estimable 
wife and four children, two sons and two 
daughtei s, Alvin D. Hodson, who is foreman 
of the Indiana Lumber Company; George H. 
Hodson, of the firm of Boyd & Hodson, of this 
city, and Arila and Bmelia Hodson, who reside 
with their parents in their handsome and 
commodious home at No. 723 Park avenue, in 
Lhapin Paik. 



well as a full line of bicycle supplies. He also 
deals in awnings. Mr. Camper has been twice 
married. In 1865, Christmas Day, he was 
married to Miss Mary E. Smith, who died in 



JAMES W. CAMPER. 

Mr. James W. Camper is a native of South 
Bend, and for almost a thiid of a century has 
been an active business man here. He was 
born June 13, 1836, and is a son of William 
Camper and Elizabeth (SteversJ Camper. He 
was educated in the public schools here, and 
in 1852 and 1853 attended Notre Dame. In 
1868 Mr. Camper started in the gun and am- 
munition business, which he has successfully 
followed. He has a large and nicely appointed 
store at No. 116 West Colfax avenue, wheie 
he carries a complete line of all kinds of guns, 
ammunition, revolvers and a general line of 
sporting goods. In 1888 Mr. Camper added 
bicycles, and handles the celebrated Dayton, 
Yale, Crescent, Reading and Royal wheels, as 




JAMES W. CAMPER. 

18S5. In 1886 he was married to Mrs. Emma 
(Culp) Miller, and resides in a p.etty home 
at 817 Park avenue. 



JOHN P. ME1GHAN. 

Mr. John F. Meighan, the engineer of the 
tuy of south Bend, is a practical engineei 
of .ong experience, and of unquestioned ability 
in his profession. He was born in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, July 25, 1847, and his father, Patrick 
Meighan, was a piominent conti actor in that 
city. His ear.y education was acquired in the 
private schools of Ohio, and he afterwaid 
studied civil engineering in the college at 
the Hallbrook Institute. He went to Logans- 
poit, Indiana, in 187z, and worked at engineer- 
ing and surveying in the Wabash VaLey 
country for several years. He was elected 
County Surveyor of Carro.l County for three 
consecutive terms, and was appointed United 
States Deputy Suiveyor by George W. Juiien, 
Surveyor Gene.al of New Mexico, in 1885. He 
worked in the public surveys and at mining and 
irrigation engineering in that section of the 
country for over three years. The fall of 1888 
ne came to South Bend and established himself 
in business as a civil engineer, and almost 



21 -J 



SOUTH BEND 



from that time until 1S97 he acted as assistant 
to the City Engineer, and in that capacity 
acquired a thorough knowledge of the needs 
and requirements of the city from an engineer- 




JOIIX F. &LEIGHAX. 

ing standpoint. He was appointed City Engi- 
neer in April, lbUO. and has proven himself 
a thoroughly able and efficient official. He has 
mastered eveiy detail of the system of pubic 
improvements, in this and other progressive 
cities, and ranks hign in his chosen profession. 
Mr. Meighan was married to an estimable lady 
who died and left him the care of three boys. 
He is a quiet, undemonstrative man, but with 
a capacity for work and full of valuable re- 
sources, he is eminently fitted for the iespon- 
sible position he now holds. 



CHARLES VINSON. 

Mr. Charles Vinson has been an honoied 
citizen of South Bend for nearly half a cen- 
tury, and for more than thirty years was an 
ii< tive and successful business man in this 
i ity. Mr. Vinson is a native of Germany, and 
was born at Waldorf, near Fiankfort-on-the- 
Main. September 10, 1825. He is a son of 
Phillip Vinson, a prosperous and prominent 
butcher in that locality. Mr. Vinson received 
his education in his native town, and learned 
his father's business, being engaged by him 
until 1S53, when he decided to come to Ameri- 
ca. He was twenty-seven years of age when 



he located in South Bend, in 1852. and at once 
established himself in the meat business on 
West Washington street, between Main and 
.Michigan streets. He fully understood every 
detail of his business and was successful fiom 
the outset, and always commanded a large 
trade. For thirty yeais he transacted a large 
business at the old stand, and in 1883 he 
retired with a competence. Since that time 
he has been temporarily engaged in the fur- 
nituie and confectionery business, but has 
largely devoted himself to the care of his 
pioperties. Mr. \ inson has always taken a 
deep interest in public affairs, and was City 
.Marshal from 1S56 to 1S5S. In 1SS4 he was 
chosen as a member of the City Board of 
Health, and served in that office until 1889. 
He is highly esteemed in the community, and 
has many warm fiiends among the older resi- 
dents of the city, and is a member of Robert 
Blum Lodge of the I. O. O. F. In 1859 he was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Pulvermiller, a most 
estimable lady, and a native of Niederbrun, 
near Strasburg, who shared his domestic life 
until October 2o, 1899, when death entered 
the household and claimed the loving and de- 
voted wife and mother for his own. Mr. Vin- 
son's family consists of a son and daughter, 




CHARLES \ INMIN. 

Mr. Charles H. Vinson, who has been engaged 
in the office of the Studebaker Bros. Manufac- 
turing Company for twenty-eight years, and 
Mrs. W. S. Robertson, with whom he resides 
in the old home at 315 West Jefferson street. 



SOUTH BEND. 



215 



Mr. Vinson was one of the promoters and or- 
ganizers of the German Evangelical Church in 
this city in 1S63, and is a trustee and a liberal 
contiibutor to its support. 



F. P. NICELY. 



Mr. F. P. Nicely, one of South Bend's suc- 
cessful business men, is a native of Indiana, 
and was born at Cambridge City, August 7, 
1864. When but a child his parents removed 
to Kansas, where the family remained for 
four years, when they removed to Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Here in the public schools of the Queen 
City the subject of this sketch was educated 
and lived until he had reached his sixteenth 




m ^ r. 




F. P. NICELY. 

year. At that age he started out in the world 
to seek his fortune. He began work in a paper 
mill in the Miami Valley, and learned the 
trade in a most thorough manner, and worked 
for a number of years in the leading mills in 
that section. He then went to South Carolina, 
where he engaged in the same line, and then 
to Wisconsin, where he continued in the busi- 
ness, until 1882, when he came to South Bend. 
When he landed in this city he had just 
twenty-five cents in his pocket. He found em- 
ployment with Lucius Clark & Co., who sold 
out the business to the Indiana Paper Com- 
pany in 1884. He was then employed by the 
latter company and took entire charge of the 
business until the spring of 1899, when he 
leased the E. S. Reynolds paper mill, on Mad- 



ison street, and started in business for himself, 
and has won success and built up a large trade 
that keeps the mill running night and day. 
Mr. Nicely makes a fine grade of wrapping 
paper for the general trade, and makes five 
tons daily, marketing the output in Chicago 
and other central points. Mr. Nicely is an 
energetic business man whose long experience 
in the paper trade makes nlm conversant with 
every detail of it. He is a man of integrity 
and thoroughly public spirited, and lends his 
inhuence to all enterprises calculated to ad- 
vance the city's best interests. Being assured 
of the future of South Bend, he has erected a 
store building and flats on South Michigan 
street and Broadway at a cost of about 
$8,000.00. Mr. Nicely was married in 1887 
to Miss Elva Slough, a native of St. Joseph 
County, and resides in a handsome home at 
the corner of South Main and Broadway. 



C. B. MURPHY. 



Mr. C. B. Murphy, the energetic agent of the 
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway 
Company, of this city, was born at Toledo. 
Ohio, September it, 1857. Mr. Murphy is a son 
of John Murphy, a well known resident of 
Toledo, and Hannah (Dillmore) Murphy. Young 
Murphy received his education in the public 
and high schools of his native city, and when 
he had completed his education decided upon 
a military field training, and enlisted in Com- 
pany D, Third United States Cavalry, and 
went into active service in the Indian wars of 
the late seventies in Nebraska, Wyoming and 
the Northwest. Mr. Murphy saw hard service 
under Generals Merritt, Miles and Henry, and 
participated in many of the most noted battles 
of the Indian campaigns, and was promoted 
from a private to First Sergeant. He was 
active and gallant .n the campaign against 
the Utes in 1878, and was in the battles fought 
during July and August of that year under 
General Merritt. In the Cheyenne campaign, 
in February, 1878, he helped capture Chief 
Dull Knife and his band. Sergeant Murphy 
was mustered out oi service after five years, 
and returned to Toledo, where he was employed 
a short time by the Pennsylvania Railway 
Company, resigning his position to accept one 
with the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern. 
He went in the erupoy of the Lake Shore 
December 22, 1881, as a clerk in the freight 
office at Toledo, and has been continually in 
the service of the company. In ±883 he was 
promoted to pool clerk, and in 1S84 to contract- 
ing agent of the company in Toledo. In 1890 



■mi; 



SOUTH BEND 



he was made agent at the Wagon Works, a 
hustling suburb of Toledo, where is located 
the Milburn Wagon uompany and other indus- 
tries, in April, 1893, he was made agent at 
Laporte, Indiana, and in September of the same 
year was made agent here, where he has since 
remained. Mr. Murphy is widely known in 
railway circles as an energetic and capable 
official. Mr. Murphy was married in 1885 to 
Miss Lenore Packer, of Toledo, and resides at 
No. 1211 South Michigan street. 



DR. JAMES H. CANNON. 

Dr. James H. Cannon is a physician of. 
prominence, and although he has but recently 
associated with the medical fraternity of this 




... 







DK. JAMES II. < A.NNnN. 

city, has been in successful practice for a 
number or years. He was born in Park County 
Indiana, February 19, 1856, and his father, R. 
P. H. Cannon, was a prominent citizen in that 
locality. When he was but two years of age 
his father removed to Muscatine, Iowa, where 
his early education was acquired. In 1867 his 
family returned to Indiana, and the young man 
completed his studies in the public and high 
schools of this state. He went to Greenfield, 
Missouri, in 1878, and afterward attended the 
Missouri Medical College, at St. I.ouis, gradu- 
ating from that institution in 1881. He at once 
commenced the general practice of medicine 
and surgery, and was located in Jasper, Mis- 
souri, and Topeka, Kansas, for a number of 



years. He was next officially connected with 
tlic Hospital Association of the Atchison. To- 
peka and Santa Fe Railway Company, and for 
years had charge of the medical work for that 
corporation in the mining town of Toluca, Il- 
linois. Seeking a wider field of usefulness, 
l>r. Cannon came to South Bend in 1899, and 
at once was recognized as an able and ex- 
pert physician and surgeon, and is highly es- 
teemed in the community. He is a member 
of the Masonic, K. O. T. M., Modern Wood- 
men, A. O. U. W., and the Eastern Star Fra- 
ternities. Dr. Cannon was married to Miss 
Harriet M. Talbutt, of Greenfield, Missouri, 
and with his family resides at No. 224 North 
Main street. 



NELSON L. JONES. 

Mr. Nelson L. Jones, who, since November, 
1899, has been connected with the firm of 
Studebaker & Jones, tne prominent funeral 
directors of South Bend, is a native of Indiana, 
and was born in Johnson County, Januaiy 21, 
iSbS. His father, N. H. Jones, was a successful 
farmer in that locality. As a boy he attended 
ine district schools in the vicinity of his home, 
and the high scnool at Whiteland, Indiana. 
Later he took a course at Adrian College, at 




NELSON I., .mines. 

Adrian, Michigan, and then went to Indianapo- 
lis, where for three years he was engaged in 
the hardware business unier W. P. Maine. 



SOUTH BEND. 



217 



He then connected himself with the great 
tuneral directing establishment of Fianner & 
Buchanan, in Indianapolis, where he remained 
for eight years. Here he acquired a thorough 
Knowledge of that important business, and 
during the last three years with the firm had 
entire charge and management of their ex- 
tensive business. In 1896 he came to South 
Bend and was the chief assistant to Mr. D. E. 
Huntsinger, in which position he remained 
until iNovember, 1899, when Mr. Huntsinger 
retired, and was succeeded by tne firm of 
Studebaker & Jones. Mr. Jones is a master 
of every detail of this delicate profession, and 
is one of the most careful and expert embalm- 
ers in the west. He is a graduate of the well 
known Ciark's College of Embalming, and aft- 
erward took a post-graduate course in the Ori- 
ental ochool of Embalming, at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. He aiso took a special course in 
aodominal surgery and dissection under the 
late Dr. Marsee. of Indianapolis, and is thor- 
oughly equipped by study, experience and prac- 
tice for the profession he now so successfully 
follows. He is fraternally associated with 
the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and 
the B. P. O. E., and is a member of the Com- 
mercial-Athletic Club. He was married in 1896 
to Miss .anna Hobart, whose home was near 
Toledo, Ohio, and with his family, consisting 
of two sons, resides at No. 424 Larnont Ter- 
race, in Chapin Park. 



DR. JOHN A. STOECKLEY. 

Dr. John A. Stoeckley is one of the reliable 
and expert young dentists of this city, and 
enjoys the confidence and esteem of the com- 
munity. He is a native of Ohio, and was born 
in Monroeville, in that state, May 20, 1870. 
When ne was but a year old his father, An- 
thony Stoeckley, died. Dr. Stoeckley, even in 
his boyhood, was ambitious to succeed in life, 
and all his youthful energies were devoted to 
the accomplishment of this object. His early 
education was acquired in the common and 
high schools of his native town, and when he 
arrived at proper age ne engaged in the drug 
business in Monroeville, and afterward in 
Cleveland, Ohio. Being dependent upon his 
own resources, the young man came to South 
Bend, and for several years was connected 
with the well known pharmacist, E. R. Van- 
derhoof, where he soon became deservedly 
popular and a most efficient druggist. Having 
selected dentistry as his profession, he attend- 
ed the Chicago Dental College, and graduated 
with honor from that institution in 1896. Dr. 



Stoeckley is practically a self made man, and 
by his own unaided efforts, and close study 
of his delicate and responsible profession, he 
attained his present prominence. He is a 
practical and progressive dental surgeon, and 
his clients are among the many influential 
and substantial citizens ot South Bend, and a 
large patronage from Notre Dame University. 
His office at 111 West Washington street is 
equipped with every appliance known to mod- 
ern dentistry, and his courtesy and the excel- 
lence of his professional methods have in- 




DU. JOHN A. STOECKLEY. 

creased and maintained his popularity. He is 
a member of the Alumni Association of the 
Chicago Dental College. Dr. Stoeckley is un- 
married and is a favorite in the social circles 
of the city. 



SAMUEL W. STUDEBAKER. 

Mr. Samuel W. Studeuaker, of the firm of 
Studebaker & Jones, the prominent funeral 
directors and undertakers of South Bend, is 
well and favorably known in this community. 
He is a native of this city, and was born April 
2, 1854. His father, Henry Studebaker, was 
a prominent and esteemed resident. Mr. Stude- 
baker received his early education in the public 
schools of this city and at the University of 
Notre Dame, and for twelve years was en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and the man- 
agement of the farm of Peter E. Studebaker. 



218 



SOUTH BEND 



He then engaged in the livery business, and 
tor nine years conducted the handsomely 
equipped livery and boarding stables on South 
Main street. In November, 1899, in connec- 




<*m** 



1884, the church was dedicated by the Rt. 
Rev. Bishop Dwenger, of Fort Wayne. A parish 
school has also been added and erected ou 
the grounds, and the scholars number 160. The 
Rev. Peter Johannes is a native of Germany, 
and was born at Eischen, Grand Duchy of Lux- 
embourg, September 29, 1855. His father was 
John Johannes, a well known farmer in that 
locality. Father Johannes attended the parish 
schools at Eischen, and afterward was a stu- 
dent at the Athenaeum in Luxembourg. He 
came to America and joined the Congregation 
of the Holy Cross at Notre Dame, Indiana, in 
1874. He was professed in 1875, and was or- 
dained to the priesthood October 12, 1878. In 
1 s77, however, prior to his ordination, he taught 
in St. Joseph's College at Cincinnati. Ohio, 
and he was first stationed as a priest in the 
Church of the Sacred Heart, at New Orleans, 
Louisiana, from 1879 to 1881. In 1882 he came 
to South Bend and took charge of the congre- 
gation of St. Mary's. Father Johannes was 
always deeply interested in the cause of edu- 
cation, and he first organized his parish school 
in the sacristy of the church, with twenty- 
seven children. From that inception both the 
church and the school have made rapid ad- 
vancement and marked progress. In 1S84 a 



SAMUEL W. STUDEBAKER. 

tion with Mr. Nelson L. Jones, he purchased 
the business of D. E. Huntsinger, in the estab- 
lished undertaking business, at 307 West Jef- 
ferson street, which has since been under the 
direction of Studebaker &. Jones. Mr. Stude- 
baker is a gentleman of high business stand- 
ing and enjoys the esteem of the entire com- 
munity. He is a member of the Indiana Club, 
and of the K. O. T. M. Fraternity. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary E. Martin, formerly of New 
York, and with his family resides at No. 114 
Franklin Place. 



REV. PETER JOHANNES, C. S. C. 

The Rev. Peter Johannes, the honored 
father in charge of St. Mary's German Catholic 
Church, located on South Taylor street, has 
been in clerical charge of that congregation 
since it was established, in February, 1882. 
The congregation was originally established 
by Father Johannes, and under his wise guid- 
ance and spiritual leadership it has grown to 
its present membership of one hundred and 
fifty families, and the beautiful church of St. 
Mary's has also been erected under his incum- 
bency. The first service was held in this 
church on Christmas day, 1S83. On May 11, 




REV. P. JOHANNES, C. S. C. 

one story school building was erected and an 
additional story erected in 1891. The school 
was placed in the hands of the Sisters of the 
Holy Cross, and four teachers are now engaged. 



SOUTH BEND 



219 



In 1895 lie purchased the priest's residence 
at No. 431 South Taylor street, and the same 
year St. Mary's Hall was designed for the 
meeting of the church societies, and erected 
on the grounds belonging to the church. Among 
the organizations connected with St. Mary's are 
the St. John's Benevolent Society, Catholic 
Knights of America, St. Bonitace Branch; St. 
Marys Commandery, uniformed; Catholic 
Knights and Ladies, Sacred Heart Altar So- 
ciety, Young Ladies Sodality, and the Holy 
angels Sodality. The church has been hand- 
somely beautified and lighted and heated, and 
is to-day in a most prosperous condition, and 
exercises a vast power for good. Father Jo- 
hannes has won the esteem and affection of his 
congregation, and through every progressive 
step he has been its most earnest director and 
instigator. 



DR. CLEM SH1DLER. 

Among the leading and deservedly successful 
young dentists ot South Bend must be men- 
tioned Dr. Clem Shidler, whose hadsomely 
appointed parlors and operating rooms are lo- 
cated in the Kizer building, at the southeast 
corner of Washington and Lafayette streets. 
Dr. Shidler was born at Lakeville, St. Joseph 




his earlies years he attended the village 
schools, and afterward was sent to the Indi- 
ana State Normal School, where he graduated 
as a Bachelor of Science. Deciding upon a 
professional career, he entered the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery, serving as assistant 
chemist in that institution for the entire three 
years of his course. He graduated in 1S99, 
carrying off the Certificate of Honor given in 
the operating department. He is a member 
of the Supreme Chapter of the Delta Sigma 
Delta Fraternity, the Alumni and the Odonto- 
logical Society, and he has always taken an 
active part in these societies for the further- 
ance of knowledge in the dental science. He 
at once came to South Bend and opened an 
ortice for the practice of his profession. He 
.s an expert and painstaking operator, and has 
already achieved a justly earned reputation 
tor the superior excellence of his work, and 
nits patrons are among the leading families of 
this city. Dr. Shidler is popular in the social 
circles of South Bend, and is regarded as one 
or the best and most expert among the dental 
fraternity of the city. 



Dl{. CLEM SHIDLER. 

County, Indiana, and his father, Adam W. 
Shidler, is a prominent farmer in that section 
of the country, and the young man had all 
the advantages of a superior education. In 



DR. JULIA D. GODFREY. 

Dr. Julia D. Godfrey, who is a successful 
medical practitioner in this city, is a native 
of Ohio, and is the descendent of a most excel- 
lent family. Her parents were Abner DeVore 
(originally DeVere) and Louise M. (Gardner) 
DeVore. and her father was a prosperous farm- 
er. Dr. Godfrey received her early education 
in the public schools in the Ursuline Convent. 
She entered the Lebanon State Normal School, 
but the death of her mother, which occurred 
soon after, compelled her to relinquish her 
studies and assume the management of her 
father's household. She afterward taught 
school for several terms. She was married 
to Rev. Samuel Godfrey, D. L. Inspired by a 
desire to study medicine. Mrs. Godfrey be- 
came a matriculant of Hahnemann Medical 
College, of Chicago, from which honored insti- 
tution she graduated in 1891. She commenced 
ner practice in this city, and was remarkably 
successful for several years, when she removed 
to Chicago and practiced her profession there 
for more than two years. Dr. Godfrey then 
removed to Delavan, Wisconsin, where she 
acquired a high reputation as a physician and 
surgeon. It was here that, under the advice 
and assistance of Prof, von aeissemilch, a 
noted German physician and scientist, who was 
graduated from Berlin anu Paris colleges, Dr. 
Godfrey decided to make her professional spe- 



220 



SOUTH BEND 



cialty the treatment of diseases of women, 
ana in this branch of her profession she has 
won success and reputation. Dr. Godfrey is 
a thorough student and has taken seveial post- 




town High Schocfl, and when he had completed 
his education started in commercial life with 
his brother, C. W. Rider, at Watertown. After 
seven years he went to iimghaniton, New York, 
and with Mr. W. A. Ebblie started in the five 
and ten cent store business, at which he has 
since continued with success, now having large 
stores at South Bend, Lafayette, Indiana. 
Quincy, Llinois, and Davenpo:t. Iowa. In 1893 
ne came to South Bena and started in his 
present successful business, and his large store 
is one of the busiest snopping marts in the 
city. The store is completely fitted with every 
modern device, cash carrier service, etc., and 
the stock is varied and complete, embracing 
every manner of useful and ornamental arti- 
cles, toys, china, glassware, confectionery, 
books, stationery, household utensils, Yankee 
notions, ribbons, laces, etc. A large force of 
experienceu clerks give courteous attention to 
shoppers, and Rider's Five and Ten Cent Store 
is popular with every class of trade. Mr. Rider 
is a young man of high commercial sagacity 
and integrity. He is a member of the Indiana 
Club and the Commercial-Athletic Club, and 



DR. JULIA D. GODFREY. 



graduate courses in special branches, particu- 
larly electiicity and orificial surgery- She is 
a lady of refinement and culture, and as a 
medical practitioner is capaoie and conscien- 
tious to a high degree. She is a member of 
the Northern Indiana ana Southern Michigan 
Medical Association. Her office is in the Dean 
building and her patients are among the lead- 
ing families of this section, and Chicago and 
Wisconsin. She resides with her family at No. 
530 Vistula avenue. 



SOLON D. KIDER. 

Mr. Solon D. Rider, proprietor of the large 
and popular Five and Ten Cent Store at No. 
127 South Michigan street, is a young business 
man whose ability anu commercial genius have 
rapidly brought him to the front and won for 
him a justly deserved success. Mr. Rider is 
a native of the Empire State, and was born in 
the City of Watertown, Mew York, July 28, 
1867. He is a son of Mr. Charles Rider, a 
successful farmer of Sanford's Corners, Jef- 
ferson County. New York, and his mother was 
Maryette (WinslowJ Rider. Young Rider was 
educated in the public schools and the Water- 




m il. i in II. RIDEB. 



popular in business and social circles. He was 
married in 1S92 to Miss Clara Kennedy, ot 
Watertown, New York, and resides with his es- 
timable wife at No. 435 South Main street. 



SOUTH BEND, 



221 



AUGUST OHM. 
Mr. August Ohm, one of the leading con- 
tractors and builders of this state, whose 
home is at Terre Haute, Indiana, is the con- 
tractor and constructor of the handsome new 




DR. WALTER D. CHAFFEE. 

Dr. waiter D. Chaffee, who has achieved an 
excellent reputation in this city as a progres- 
sive and skillful gynaecologist and physician, 
is a native of Lima, Michigan. He was horn 
August 4, 1864, and his father, Rev. Comfort 
T. Chaffee, D. D., was a prominent Baptist 
clergyman in that city. Dr. Chaffee received 
his literary education at the Central Univer- 
sity of Pella, Iowa, and at the State University 
at Lincoln, Nebraska, after which he studied 
medicine in the famous Hahnemann College, of 
Chicago, where he grauuated in 1887. For a 
short time he practiced his profession at East 
Saginaw, and at Three Rivers, Michigan, and 
in 188i* he came to Soutn Bend, where he has 
been in continuous and successful practice to 
the present time. Dr. Chaffee is an acknowl- 
edged authority on gynaecology, and is a spe- 
cial practitioner in that important branch of 
medical science. He is a member of the med- 
ical staff of the Epworth Hospital, and lectures 
before the Training School for Nurses on 
Materia Medica. He is also a member of the 
National Institute of Homeopathy, and the 
Northern Indiana and Southern Michigan 
Homeopathic Medical Society, and has con- 
tributed a number of interesting papers to the 



AUGUST OHM. 

banking house of the St. Joseph County Sav- 
ings Bank, at North Main and Center streets. 
This handsome three story building, of brick 
and stone, is one of the structural ornaments 
of the city, and one of the prettiest buildings 
here. The front and side is of fine cut Bed- 
ford stone, beautifully ornamented, and pre- 
senting a most massive and yet graceful ap- 
pearance. The interior is equally handsomely 
finished. Mr. Ohm is a contractor and builder 
of long experience and high reputation, and 
his work has always met with the highest 
commendation. He was the constructor of 
the magnificent building known as the Indiana 
State Building, at the World's Columbian Ex- 
position, in 1893; the Vandalia freight and 
passenger station in this city, and he was also 
the contractor and builder of the Big Four 
passenger station at Terre Haute, the 
Monogher & Dresslin Hotel, the Indiana 
State Normal School, the United States Post- 
offlce, and Marshall Flat buildings at Terre 
Haute, as well as many other fine buildings. 
Mr. Ohm appreciates the push and advantages 
of South Bend, and is contemplating making 
this city his future home. His work on the 
St. Joseph County Savings Bank Building 
ranks him as a leading builder. 




DR. WALTER D. CHAFFEE. 

leading medical journals of the country. He 
was married to Miss Emma L. Bradford of 
Quincy, Illinois, and resides at No. 525 Portage 
avenue. 



222 



SOUTH BEND. 



EDMUND A. CHOCKELT. 

Mr. Edmund A. Choekelt is the only son 
and succesor of his father, John A. Choekelt. 
the well known manufacturer of wagons and 
carriages of this city. He was born here 







I 



.^V 



. 



^&L,. 




highly honored and respected citizens of La- 
porte County. When he was but seven years 
of age Mr. Dickson removed, with his mother, 
to Kansas City. Missouri, where he remained 
nearly thirty years. He acquired his early 
education in the public schools of that city, 
and supplemented this by self study and a 
comprehensive line of reading. Being of an 
artistic and poetical temperament, he early 
evinced a taste for art, literature and poetry, 
which, combined with a deep love of nature, 
his mental gifts were largely cultivated and 
developed by numerous trips through the wild 
\vi stern country. From early boyhood he was 
a contributor to standard western journals, 
and at the age of seventeen he became a re- 
porter on the Kansas City Journal. He soon 
became known throughout the west as a bril- 
liant journalist and writer on religio-philo- 
sophical subjects and a poet of nature, and his 
numerous writings appeared in many of the 
magazines and journals of the day. In 1SS4 
he founded the Dickson School of Business 
Technique, which continued in successful 
operation for about thirteen years. He was 
the author of a successful work entitled "Mod 
ern Punctuation," now largely in use through- 
out the United States, and several popular 



EDM1 M) A. I IIOCKELT. 

January 30, 1871, and acquired his education 
here in the public schools and German Acad- 
emy, and took a course in the local Commercial 
College. After leaving school he entered the 
establishment of his father at 115-117 West 
Jefferson street, and acquired a practical 
knowledge of the workings of every depart- 
ment of this extensive manufactory. Since the 
death of his father, in September, 1899, he 
has ably managed the business and increased 
its trade in the western cities. Mr. Choekelt 
is a thorough business man, and is one of the 
most energetic and progressive manufacturers 
of this city. He was married to Miss Kather- 
ine Heller, of South Bend, and lives at No. 
126 South Main street. 



WILLIAM BRADFORD DICKSON. 

Mr. William Bradford Dickson, formerly the 
leader of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
of this city, and the author of the beautiful 
religio-philosophical poems, entitled "Psalms 
of Soul," is well known in the community. 
Mr. Dickson is a native of Indiana, and was 
born in the village of Rolling Prairie, Septem- 
ber 23. 1881. He is the youngest son of Daniel 
Morris Dickson and Mary Ann Dickson, both 




WILLIAM BRADFORD DICKSON. 

text books on business college work. Yield- 
ing to his early religious tendencies he closed 
his college to become a follower and practi- 
tioner of Christian Science. He was First 



SOUTH BEND, 



223 



Reader of the Second Church of Christ, Sci- 
entist, of Kansas City for several years, when 
he returned to Indiana and became connected 
with the First Church of this city as First 
Reader, or Conductor of Services, he, with 
his wife and a number of local Christian Sci- 
entists, being the founders of the present 
church. In November, 1900, he issued his 
beautiful poems, entitled "Psalms of Soul, 
a unique anu elevating volume appealing to 
the higher thought life. Mr. Dickson was united 
in maniage in 1883 to Miss Clara M. Barret, 
daughter of Richard and Sarah A. Barret, of 
Springfield, Illinois, both of whom were inti- 
mate friends of ADraham Linco n, and Mrs. 
Barret is mentioned in "Herndon's History of 
Lincoln" as one of the great President's most 
intimate lady, friends, whom he desired to make 
his wife, but was not accepted. Mr. Dickson 
is a conscientious man of great energy, and 
enjoys the esteem of all who have met him. 



FRED J. LOUGHMAN. 

Mr. Fred J. Loughman, the junior member 
of the well known firm of Loughman Hubbard 
& Loughman. transfer agents and extensive 
dealers in coal and wood, was born in Mish- 







FKED. J. L0DGHM.4N. 

awaka, December 28, 1874. His father is Mr. 
James H. Loughman, the senior member of 
the firm, who removed to South Bend when his 
son was but a child. Mr. Loughman attended 



the public schools in this city, and when old 
enough was engaged in business with his fa- 
ther, and acquired a thorough knowledge of 
all its details. In 1S98 the present firm was 
established, and Mr. Loughman was made an 
active partner in the concern, for which his 
previous experience so eminently qualified him. 
He is a practical and progressive business 
man, and enjoys the esteem of hosts of friends. 
He was married in 1895 to Miss Catherine 
Rock, and with his young son, James Alfred 
Loughman, resides at No. 1013 Vistula avenue. 



DR. FRANK D. HAGER, D. D. S. 

Dr. Frank D. Hager. the well known dentist, 
whose office and parlors are at No. 10S West 
Washington street, is a native of Canada, and 




DR. PRANK D. IIAGER, D. D. S. 

was born at Hagersville, Ontario, December 
14, 1871, the son of Charles Hager and Mary 
(Howard) Hager. As a boy he attended the 
Caledonia Collegiate Institute, an educational 
institution near his nome, and there received 
a good education. He next took a course 
in the Normal School for Teachers, and then 
adopted the profession of teaching, which he 
continued one year. Mr. Hager decided to take 
up another profession, and chose that of den- 
tistry, and began its study with Dr. Nobbs, 
of Hagersville, Ontario. He then took a course 
at the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 
where he received his degree in 1896, after 



224 



SOUTH BEND. 



which he took a post-graduate course at the 
Chicago Dental College. Concluding his pro- 
fessional studies, he came to South Bend and 
began a successful practice, and has built up 
a clientele among our best families. Dr. Hager 
was ma:ried in 1899 to Miss Adalyn von Trump, 
of this city. 



THOMAS W. SLICK. 

Mr. Thomas W. Slick, of South Bend, is a 
type of the progressive American of the west. 
He is a native of this city, and was born July 
5, 1869. He is a son of Thomas J. Slick, for- 
merly a local merchant and later a successful 
farmer, and was Assessor of St. Joseph County. 
The young man attended the public schools 
and graduated from the high school in 1889. 
He afterward went to the Michigan University 
at Ann Arbor, where he took the regular law 
course and a special course in the literary de- 
partment, graduating in 1S93 with the honor- 
able degree of LL.B. He was admitted to the 
Dar during that year, and at once commenced 
the practice of his protession, and was re- 
markably successtul. On March 22, 1897, on 
the division of the judicial circuit composed 
oi Laporte and St. Joseph Counties, he was 
appointed Prosecuting Attorney for the St. 




oi fine literary attainments and well versed in 
the law. As a public prosecutor he has been 
remarkably successful, and in the conduct of 
his cases nas won the esteem and confidence 
ot both the bench ana the bar. He distin- 
guished himself in the prosecution of the 
West, Pinkerton and Burke cases wffich at- 
tracted general attention, and in a number of 
other prosecutions during his term of office 
has shown marked ability and achieved weii 
earned success. Mr. Slick is identified with 
a number of enterprises of a business nature, 
and is secretary oi the new River View Ceme- 
tery Association, in which he is connected with 
many of the leaumg citizens of South Bend. 
His office is at No. 119 North Main street. In 
private life he is a genial gentleman of refine- 
ment and culture, and his home at No. 521 
Vistula avenue is presiued over by his estima- 
ble wife, who was formerly Miss Mollie G. 
Falknor. They have two sons. The future of 
Mr. Slick is fraught with Drilliant promise, 
and his popularity in the community will even- 
tually lead to higher honor. 



THOMAS \Y. SLICK 



Joseph County District by Governor Mount, of 
Indiana, and was re-elected in 1898 by the 
voters of the circuit. Mr. Slick is a gentleman 



BENJAMIN I. NEWMAN. 

Mr. Benjamin 1. Newman, who is the owner 
of the handsome and splendidly equipped "Nov- 
elty Barn," at Nos. 32o-328 South Michigan 
street, and the extensive and modern livery 
at Nos. 213, 215 and 217 South Main street, 
and the livery and transfer barns on North 
Michigan street, is a native of Indiana, and 
was born in Walcotville, LaGrange County, 
February 9, 1860. After attending the public 
schools, young Newman removed to Goshen, 
where he was engaged in the teaming business, 
and although but a mere boy, he hauled the 
largest log that was ever carried into Goshen. 
He removed to South Bena in 1880, and with 
the exception of one year, spent in California, 
has resided here ever since. For years he 
was engaged in the hack business with Messrs. 
Gish & Miller, and was then in the omnibus 
business with Wayne Miller, under the firm 
name of Miller & Newman. He was then 
associated with Frank Ward in the same busi- 
ness, and seven years ago he engaged in the 
livery business on his own account, and since 
that time has been one of the most successful 
and popular liverymen in this city. The open- 
ing of the "Novelty Barn" was an event of 
local importance, and the novel and handsome 
carriages, buggies, coupees, stanhopes and 
drags, all made specially for Mr. Newman by 
Studebakers, were au of the latest designs and 
styles, and horses and harness were in full 



SOUTH BEND 



225 



accord with the splendid equipages with which 
this barn was stocked. The opening of this 
enterprise by Mr. Newman had much to do 
with the improvement of the private teams 




Corry, Pennsylvania, where he was born Feb- 
ruary 18, 1870. His father, Arthur J. Hub- 
bard, was a manager for the Standard Oil 
Company, and his mother was Eliza M. (Wade) 
Hubbard. Until he was twelve years of age 
young Hubbard lived at Corry, where he at- 
tended the public schools. In 1882 his parents 
removed to tnis city, where he went to the 
public schools. When he had completed his 
education he went to work for the Standard 
Oil Company here, and later went with the 
First National Bank as collector, where he 
remained four years. In 1891 he went to De- 
fiance, Ohio, with the Standard Oil Company, 
and was there one year, when he returned to 
South Bend and was employed by Mr. J. H. 
Loughman. He then went with the Standard 
Oil Company to Fostoria. and then to Toledo, 
Ohio, and for four years traveled for that 
company. He came back to South Bend and 
started in the coal business under the style of 
Hubbard & Loughman, and two years ago 
that business was merged into the present 
enterprise, under the style of Loughman, Hub- 
bard & Loughman. Mr. Hubbard is a young 
business man of high standing. In 1891 he 



BENJAMIN I. NEWMAN. 

owned by the residents of this city, and may 
justly be regarded as a public benefit. His 
handsome and extensive stables on Main street 
also contain an excellent variety of up-to-date 
rigs of all kinds, and his horses and harness 
are the best known in the livery business. 
For theaters, parties, funerals and public dis- 
plays his equipages are in popular demand, 
and his patrons are among the best citizens 
in this vicinity. Mr. Newman repurchased the 
Ward Hack and Transfer Company's barn and 
business, including horses, wagons, hacks, 
cabs, etc., November 1, 1900, and is now the 
owner of the three best livery and transfer 
barns in South Bend. Mr. Newman has 
achieved his success by his own efforts, and 
his progressive business methods, and to-day 
conducts ine best equipped livery in the state 
of Indiana. He was married to Miss Emma 
Senrich, a native of New i'ork, and with his 
estimable wife resides at No. 305 St. Louis 
street. 



ARTHUR D. HUBBARD. 
Mr. Arthur DeVere mibbard, a member of 
the widely known firm of Loughman, Hubbard 
& Loughman, general transfer agents, movers, 




ARTHUR D. HlllBARD. 



was married to Miss Grace Loughman, daugh- 
ter of Mr. James H. Loughman, and resides 
in a pretty home at No. 729 South Michigan 



etc., No. 817 South Main street, is a native of street. 



22G 



SOUTH BEND 



THELUS M. BISSELL. 

Mr. Thelus M. Bissell, whose lamented death 
occuired at his home in this city on Ju'y 23, 
1892, was one of the best known and most 
highly honored manufacturers in the city, and 
one of the most esteemed citizens of the com- 
munity. His death was the result of an in- 
jury to his foot received at his factory, and 
which was intensified by his arduous and self- 
sacrificing labors in saving the property of 
his bi other manufacturers during the heavy 
floods in the river. Mr. Bissell was a native 
of Ohio, and was horn at Rootstown, Portage 
County, in that state, March 6, 1824. He was 
the eldest son of Alden Bissell and Hannah 
(Gilbert) Bissell, who were natives of Litch- 
field, Connecticut, but who early came to Ohio 
and settled in Portage County. During his 
early years Mr. Bissell labored with his father 
on the farm and attended the district schools 
in the vicinity of his home. Later he learned 
the carpenter and millwright trade, at which 
he worked until he was twenty-one years of 
age. He then leased a foundry in Randolph 
Ohio, in which he manufactured plows and 
made a general line of iron castings. He in- 
vented a lathe making machine and engaged 
the firm of Blodgett & Clark, in South Bend 
to build them for him. and in 1S56 came to 
this city to personally superintend their man- 
ufacture. In I860 Mr. Bissell was associated 
with James Oliver, who then conducted busi- 
ness under the firm name of Oliver, Little & 
Co. They purchased the Pox & Lamb foundry 
on the west race and conducted a general 
foundry business for about one year, when a 
fire broke out which completely destroyed the 
plant and seriously crippled the firm finan- 
cially. A new firm was organized, known as 
Oliver, Bissell & Co., and the late Geoge 
Milburn, of Mishawaka, became a partner in 
the enterprise. A few years afterward a stock 
company was incorporated under the name of 
the South Bend Iron Works, which subse- 
quently passed into the control of James 
Oliver, who purchased the stock of the com- 
pany. On severing his connection with this 
company, Mr. Bissell became identified with 
the South Bend Chilled Plow Works, with 
which he remained for about four years. Dur- 
ing this time, and for many years previous, 
Mr. Bissell had been laboring and experiment- 
ing in designing and constructing what he re- 
garded as a perfect chiiled plow, and he after- 
ward organized the Bissell Chilled Plow 
Works, whose factory was located on the west 
race. He was successful in this enterprise, 



but in 1883 a disastrous fire occurred which 
swept away the buildings and destroyed the 
labor of years. Jndaunted and undismayed, 
however, Mr. Bissell and his fellow stockhold- 
ers rebuilt the works, but in 1886 another fire 
occurred, and the company lost heavily. In 
1890 Mr. Bissell organized a new corporation 
under the name of the T. M. Bissell Chilled 
Plow Company. He was associated with his 
son, Frank Bissell, and his son-in-law, N. G. 
Dakin, but he gave his undivided attention to 
the business and was one of the most active 
and energetic members of the company. It 
was while engaged in the factory that he met 
with the accident which caused his death. 
Mr. Bissell left surviving him Mrs. Ellen Bis- 




THBLDS M. BISSELL. 

sell, his most estimable wife, who is still liv- 
ing; a daughter, Esse B., now Mrs. N. G. 
Dakin, of th.s city and Prank N. Bissell, of 
Springfield. Missouri. He was one of the or- 
ganizes of the St. Joseph County Savings 
Bank, and for twenty-three years he served 
on the board of trustees, of which he was 
one of the original members. For twenty 
years he was a director of the South Bend 
Hydraulic Company, and for ten years acted 
as president. Mr. Bissell was a man of force- 
ful character, of strong convictions, and of 
most excellent judgment. He ever sought the 
right, and was inflexible in his purpose when 
he beleived that he was right. In his domestic 
life he was tender and affectionate, and while 



SOUTH BEND 



227 



he was s'.ow to contract new friendships, they 
were strong and lasting. He was an honored 
citizen, and enjoyed the esteem of the com- 
munity, who sincerely mourned his death. His 
funeral was attended by his many friends, and 
C. A. Kimball, L. G. Tong, George W. Matthews, 
Albert G. Cushing, John Gallagher and Charles 
G. Hodson acted as pall bearers. 



WILLIAM J. HUNKER. 

The present successful management of the 
South Bend Electric Company is largely due 
to the progressive business methods adopted 




WILLIAM J. IIUNKEK. 

by its able secretary and manager, Mr. Wil- 
liam J. Hunker. Although but recently ap- 
pointed to that responsible position, Mr. 
Hunker has already demonstrated rare ability 
in the affairs of the company, and has ma- 
terially increased the scope of its operations, 
while effecting a marked decrease in its legiti- 
mate expenditures. Mr. Hunker is a native 
of the Keystone State, and was born at Pitts- 
burg. Pennsylvania, September 6, 1866. His 
father. Mr. William P. Hunker, was a manu- 
facturer of confectionery, and is at present 
superintendent of the Allegheny City Poor 
Farm and Insane Hospital. Mr. Hunker at- 
tended the public and high schools of Pitts- 
burg, and on the completion of his education 
he entered the City Engineer's office as sur- 
veyor in 1883. He retained this position until 
'887, when he entered the employ of the Al- 



legheny County Electric Light Company, of 
which George Westinghouse, Jr., was the pres- 
ident. In 1890 he was made superintendent 
of the company and fulfilled the duties of this 
position until 1899, when he came to South 
Bend to assume the management of the local 
company, to which office he was appointed 
in November of that year. Mr. Hunker is a 
progressive business man of the alert and 
energetic type, and has done much to increase 
and improve the service of his company, and 
at the same time to materially lessen the cost 
of production, two essential features in the 
management of a corporation of a public char- 
acter. Mr. Hunker is a courteous gentleman 
and an enterprising official, and enjoys the 
esteem of the community. He also acts as 
the assistant treasurer ot the company and 
has charge of the finances of that institution. 
He is a member of the Indiana and Commer- 
cial-Athletic Clubs, and of the Elks. In 1891 
he was married to Miss Catherine Evans, of 
Pittsburg, and with his estimable wife resides 
in a pleasant home at the corner of Main and 
Water streets. 



BENJAMIN W. PERKINS. 

Mr. Benjamin W. Perkins, superintendent 
of the South Bend Fuel and Gas Company, was 



''-' : .\. 




BENJAMIN W. PERKINS. 

born in London, England, September 27, 1859. 
He is a son of Mr. Benjamin R. Perkins, an 
expert gas manufacturer, and Mary M. (West- 



22S 



SOUTH BEND 



wood) Perkins. Until lie was eight years of 
age young Perkins lived in London, and in 
L867 his parents came to America and located 
at Springfield, Illinois where he also attended 
school, and two years later removed to Peoria, 
Illinois. In 1872 the family removed to Frank- 
lin, Indiana, and afterward to Columbus, Indi- 
ana. In 1S76 Mr. Perkins came to South 
Bend and engaged with the South Bend Fuel 
and Gas Company, where he learned every 
detail of gas manufacture. In 1S81 he was 
made superintendent of the company, which 
position he now holds. During that time the 
company has installed the most modern gas 
making machinery and appliances and erected 
holders of large capacity, extended its mains, 
and furnishes the most complete and eco- 
nomical gas service in the state. Mr. Perkins 
is a member of the Western Gas Association 
and is one of its directors, and is also a mem- 
ber of the Ohio Gas Light Association, and 
editor of its Novelty Advertising Department. 
Mr. Perkins has contributed valuable artcles 
on gas and its manufacture to publications in 
that line. He is a member of the Commercial- 
Athletic Club and the Knights of Pythias. 
Mr. Perkins was married in 18S4 to Miss Ida 
C. Adams, of Columbus, Indiana, and with his 
estimable wife resides at No. 845 Colfax ave- 
nue. 



GEORGE C. MUESSEL. 

Mr. George C. Muessel, one of South Bend's 
oldest and most honored merchants, is a na- 
tive of Arzberg, Bavaria and was born there 
November 20, 1842. He is a son of J. B. 
Muessel and Catherine (Reis) Muessel. When 
he was a boy but six years of age his parents 
came to America and located on a farm near 
Mishawaka. In 1853 they moved to South 

Bend, where Mr. Muessel has since lived. 
He attended the public schools here, and the 
old Seminary. He was a clerk in the store 
of J. G. Bartlett for six years. In 1865, with 
Mr. Chris Kountzeman, he started in the gro- 
cery business under the style of Kountze- 
man & Muessel, and one year later bought out 
the interest of his partner. In 1872 he erected 
the present three story building at No. 113 
North Main street. In 1898 he admitted his 
son, Charles A. Muessei, to partnership, under 
the firm name of G. C. Muessel & Son. The 
firm carries a large line of staple and fancy 
groceries and has a fine trade. Mr. Muessel 
was married in 1867 to Miss Caroline Elbel 
and with his estimable wife resides at No. 
113 North Main street. 



EDWIN J. LENT, M. D. 

Dr. Edwin J. Lent is a specialist in diseases 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat, to which 
branches his practice is exclusively limited. 
Dr. Lent was born at Ficton, Prince Edward 
County, Canada. August 17, 1870. His father 
is a wholesale and retail marble dealer in that 
locality. He received his early education at 
the Picton public and high schools, and in 
18SS began his medical course at the Royal 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Queen's 
University, at Kingston. He graduated in 1892 
and came to Indiana in May of that year. He 
located in Lakeville, Indiana, in October, 1S92, 
and conducted a successful general practice 
for seven years. In 1899 he went to New York 
City and devoted his entire time to the study 




DR. EDWIN J. LENT 

of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat 
until the spring of 1900, when he returned 
and located at No. 109 West Washington street, 
South Bend. He is a member of the St. Jo- 
seph County Medical Society and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. He was married 
in December, 1893, to Miss Maud Van Liew, 
of Lakeville, and resides at No. 123 South 
Laurel street. 



LOUIS S. LA PIERRE. 

Mr. Louis S. La Pierre is one of the young, 
successful and expert dentists in this city, 
and ranks deservedly high in his profession, 
and is master of every detail of its delicate 



SOUTH BEND. 



229 



and responsible practice. He is a native of 
South Bend, and was born in this city June 
8. 1866. Dr. La Pierre is a son of J. M. La 
Pierre, who is still an active business man 




He was born in Natick, Massachusetts, July 
21, 1867, and his father, the Rev. Addison 
Parker, was a clergyman of prominence in 
that locality. After spending some time in 
the preparatory schools of the east, Mr. Park- 
er's preliminary education was received at the 
Mornstown Academy and Peddle Institute, 
Hightstown, New Jersey, and he afterward 
took a course in tne Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology at Boston. After his gradua- 
tion from that institution, in 1888, he entered 
the office of McKim, Mead & White, the lead- 
ing architects of wew York City. He remained 
with this firm three years, and then connected 
himse.f with the Tiffany Glass and Decorating 
Company, of New York, where he remained 
two years and acquired a valuable store of 
practical knowledge in decorative art. He 
practiced in Sommerville, New Jersey, for a 
short time, and then came to South Bend in 
1»92 and established tne firm of Parker & 
Austin. Mr. Parker is a thorough master of 
his artistic profession and tne citizens of South 
Bend have shown their material appreciation 



DR. LOUIS S. LARIERRE. 

here. He received his early education in the 
public schools of South Bend and Walkerton, 
and aiterward entered tne well known phar- 
macy of Cushing & Co., now owned by Samuel 
T. Appiegate. He rernai-ied witn this firm from 
ls83 to 1890, and then realizing his aptitude 
ior the dental profession, he tooK a two years' 
course at the Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery and graduated in 1892. He at once com- 
menced the practice of his cnosen profession, 
and has been remarkably successtul. His 
handsome suite of offices at Michigan ami 
Washington streets are equipped with all the 
modern dental appliances, and his work has 
gained for him a large class of valuable pa- 
tients, and established his reputation as one 
of the leading dentists of this city. He was 
married to Miss Clara Cinz, of South Bend, 
on February 17, 1896, and his pleasant and 
cosy home is located at iNo. 402 West Solfax 
avenue. 




WILSON B. PARKER. 



WILSON B. PARKER. 

Mr. Wilson B. Parker, successor of the 
architectural firm of Parker & Austin, is an 
artist of talent ana a graduate of the highest 
school of decorative art in the United States. 



of his ability. Mr. Parker was married Aug- 
ust 1, 1900, to Miss Elsie Clarke, of Laporte, 
Indiana, and now resides at No. 115 South 
William street. 



230 



SOUTH BEND. 



MELBOURNE S. ROGERS. 

Mr. Melbourne S. Rogers, superintendent of 
the City Water Works of South Bend, is a 
business man of long practical experience and 
of the most progressive methods, as can be 
seen from the efficiency of the department 
which he directs. Mr. Rogers is a native of 
the Buckeye State, and was born at East 
Liverpool, Columbiana County, Ohio, May 22, 
1855, and his father was Lawson C. Rogers, 
a successful farmer in that section, and his 
mother was Mary (Boody) Rogers. As a boy 
Mr. Rogers was reared on the farm and re- 
ceived his education in the district schools 
in the vicinity of his home. He worked on 
the farm and learned the trade of stair build- 



pumping stations, Which have a capacity of 
i2,u00,000 gallons daily; sixty-two artesian 
wells flowing for uaily consumption over 
a.000,000 gallons. The city his fifty miles 
oi street mains, 531 tire hydrants, 4,725 service 
connections, and during the last year pumped 
over 2,000,000,000 gallons ot water. Mr. 
Rogers devotes his whole time to the improve- 
ment and care ot the City Water Works. He 
is a public spirited citizen and popular in social 
and fraternal circles. He is a member of the 
Masons and the Oqu Fellows. Mr. Rogers 
was married in 18S4 to Miss Cora Klingel, 
the accomplished daughter o£ the late John 
Klingel, and with his wite and son resides 
at No. 406 North Main street. 




MKLliUlllSE !■>. KOGEHS. 

ing and engaged in contracting and the man- 
agement of a planing mill. In 1878 he came 
to South Bend and engaged in mercantile life, 
and opened a crockery and glassware store 
on North Main street, which he conducted 
sixteen years, under the style of M. S. Rogers. 
In 1895 he sold his business and retired for 
two years, and in May, 1897, was appointed 
superintendent of the Water Works, which 
responsible position he has held with the 
highest credit. He inauguiated economic 
business methods that have resulted in a 
great saving to the city, and has made the 
Water Works Department one of the most effi- 
cient in the country. The service under his 
direction comprises two completely equipped 



REV. HENRY WEBB JOHNSON, D. U. 

For nearly twelve years the Rev. Henry 
Webb Johnson, D. D., has been the able and 
progressive pastor or the first Presbyterian 
Church of this city, and has won the warm 
regard of his large congregation, anil the es- 
teem or the entire conimunuy. Dr. Johnson 
is a native of New lork, and was born at 
maples, Ontario county, for iour generations 
ms family oil his latner s sme has resided in 
this picturesque village, his great-grandfather, 
colonel John Johnson, havng settled there in 
june, 17 89. Colonel Johnson, with sixty oth- 
trs, came from Bern, Berkshire County, Mas- 
sachusetts, and purchased 23,000 acres of land 
ironi the government in Naples Valley, which 
the} divided among the members of the com- 
pany, and until he cued colonel Johnson was 
a leading lactor m the development of his 
adopted home. i'ne mother of Dr. Johnson 
was a direct descendant of Richard Webb, 
one of the broad minded .Puritans of New 
England. He came to tne new woild in 1626. 
and in June, 1636, with Rev. Thomas Hooker, 
Rev. Samuel Stone and uovernor Haines, he 
settled Hartford, Connecticut, all the mem- 
bers of the First Congregational Church of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, composing the 
company. In 16a0 ne settled Norwalk, Con- 
necticut, and accumulated great wealth. In 
a recent history of Norwalk, by Rev. C. M. 
Selleck, he writes of the antecedents and de- 
scendants of Richard Webb, Dr. Johnson's 
maternal ancestor: "Richaru Webb, Sr., who 
came, with his fellow adventurers, to Nor- 
walk, was. according to careful record in- 
vestigation, of the fourth generation (Richard 
of Norwalk IV., Alexander, Jr., III., Alexander, 
Sr.. II., Henry I.) from Henry Webb, who was 
usher to the Privy Council of Katharine 



SOUTH BEND. 



231 



(Parr), Queen Regent of Britain in the six- 
teenth century. This Henry married an Arden, 
while his sister married one of the identical 
tasuily, and had a daughter who married, May, 
1562, John Shakespeare, lather of W.lliam 
ShaKespeare, the great poet. There seems 
to have been a double Webb-Arden connection, 
which amounts, perhaps, to relationship. The 
Webb coat of arms were granted June 15, 
1577, with the motto 'Principia non Homines' 
— principles, not men. The Norwalk Webb 
father valued, it may well be supposed, this 
ancestry and affinity, but he could not foresee 
those of his name who were to succeed him, 
among whom, to the credit of Norwalk father- 
hood, were the honored Colonel Charles Webb, 




ItEV. 11E.NHY WEBB .IOIIXSON, 1). II. 

of the Revolution; General Samuel B. Webb, 
Washington s private secretary; William 
Henry Webb, the distinguished ship builder 
of New York; Hon. James Watson Webb, the 
notable New York editor; General Alexander 
S. Webb, of Gettysburg tame Dr. w. Seward 
Webb, presdent of the Wagner Palace Car 
Company; Henry Walter Weob, vice president 
of the New York Central Railroad; Lawyer 
William B. Webb, of Washington, D. C; Dr. 
George F. Webb, the Ohio inventor, and Rev. 
Henry Webb Johnson, of the west. Both of 
Dr. Johnson s great-grandfathers were in the 
war of the Revolution. From Connecticut 
alone twenty-seven memoers of his mother's 
family were in that war, among whom were the 



eminent Colonel Charles Webb and General 
Samuel B. Webb, Washington's private secre- 
tary, and who, as grand marshal, held the 
Bibie when Washington took the oath of of- 
fice. Dr. nenry Webb Johnson, the subject 
of this sketch, enjoyed the best educational 
advantages and prepared tor college largely 
at Naples Academy and other preparatory 
schools. He attended Hanover College, Han- 
over, Indiana, from which he graduated, and 
is also a graduate ot McCormick Theological 
Seminary at Chicago. His first charge was 
at Auburn, Indiana, where he was instrumen- 
tal in building the tine brick church at that 
city, and during his pastorate he gathered 
around him a large number of young men. 
After a successful pastorate of five years, he 
was called to the First Presbyterian Church 
at Grand Haven, Michigan, and from that 
city he was called to the Westminster Presby- 
terian Church at Big Rapids. Dr. Johnson 
was ever an earnest worker in his congrega- 
tion, and even in his earlier charges was a 
speaker of rare lorce and power. In both 
viiand Haven and Big Kapuis his work was 
remarkably successiul, anu he made large 
accessions to the church rneniDership at both 
places. In issy he received a tan to the 
i< irst Presbyterian Church of tins city, and 
aiter mature reflection he accepteu and com- 
menced his ministry here in June of that 
j ear. Since that time Dr. Johnson has ren- 
dered most valuable service to the church, 
and has promoted its material and spiritual 
welfare in a most successiul manner. Never 
was a church more harmonious and progres- 
sive than under his ministry, ana he holds 
the affectionate regard o: h.s people to a 
remarkable degree. He is a profound student 
of the Bible, liberal in his views, and a most 
eloquent expounder ot the truths of Christi- 
anity. Imbued with a Droad charity for the 
weaknesses of humanity, Dr. Johnson's ser- 
mons appeal to the hearts and minds of all 
who are privileged to attend his church and 
listen to his forceful utterances. He is in- 
defatigable and enthusiastic in all matters 
that tend to advance the interests of his 
church, his people and the community at large, 
and his pastorate has been the most success- 
iul which this church has known. During 
his pastorate here Dr. Johnson has received 
a number of calls to fill pulpits in leading 
churches in the prominent cities of the west, 
and with flattering financial offers, but his 
warm regard for his people and his attach- 
ment to South Bend has induced him to de- 
cline all overtures looking to his removal 
from the congregation he loves so well, and 



232 



SOUTH BEND. 



to whom he is endeared by years of asso- 
ciation. Dr. Johnson has received the de- 
grees of B. A., A. M. and D. D. from Hanover 
College, of which he is a graduate, and is 
trustee of that institution. He is also a direc- 
tor of the McCoimick Theological Seminary, 
and was one of the organizers of the Winona 
Assembly, of which he is a director and one 
ot its most active members. Dr. Johnson was 
married at Auburn, Indiana, to Miss Cidney 
Hare, a daughter of the late C. S. Hare, a 
prominent business man of that city, and an 
ex-treasurer of DeKalb County. His children 
are. Emily M. Johnson, who graduated at 
Ferry Hall, of the Lake Forest University, 
about two years ago; Edgar H. Johnson, who 
is a Junior at Princeton university, and Sadie 
Virginia Johnson, who is attending school in 
this city. Webb Allen Johnson, a son, died 
at tne age of three years at Grand Haven, 
Michigan. Dr. Johnson's home is located at 
No. 219 North Main street. 



MAJOR O. S. WITHERILL. 

Major Orlando S. Witherill. whose death 
occurred in this city November 6, 1893, was 
an honored and honorable citizen of this 




wrnircnii.i,. 



i (immunity, and one ot the most public 
spirited of men. He nad been in ill health 



for several years prior to his death, but during 
his active me he had been most prominent 
in business and public affairs. Mr. Witherill 
was a native of New York State, and was 
born in Livingston County, April 30, 1824. 
In 1830 he removed with his parents to Au- 
burn, New York, where he resided until he 
was twenty years of age, except three years, 
when he lived in Boston, Massachusetts. He 
received an excellent education in the public 
schools, and afterward learned the jeweler's 
trade. He came to South Bend in 1855 and 
engaged in the jewelry business with his 
brother, Theodore 1. Witherill, but having 
a decided inclination for the law, he studied 
tor that profession while attending to his reg- 
ular business, and soon after locating in this 
city was admitted to the bar. In 1861, when 
tne war of the rebellion occurred, he was ap- 
lointed a paymaster in the Union Army, with 
the rank of Major, and most atily served in 
that position until ne was mustered out of 
the service, in November, 1865. On his re- 
turn to this city he resumed the practice of 
the law, and was regarded as a most able, 
thorough and conscientious attorney. He was 
appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, and 
served in that office from 1868 to 1872, and 
acteu as City Attorney from 1868 to 1870. 
He was an earnest Republican in politics, 
and was an active and influential member of 
his party, and was a prominent member of 
the First Presbyterian Church, serving as an 
usher tor twenty consecutive years. He was 
one of the most open hearted and generous of 
men, ever reaay to respond to the appeals 
of the needy and unfortunate, rie was pos- 
sessed of a most genial nature, and always 
entertained a great love tor children, with 
whom he was a favorite. His domestic life 
was a most happy one, and he was the most 
tender of husbands. Mr. Witherill was mar- 
ried October 30, 1847, to Miss Mary D. Green, 
in New York, and this most estimable lady 
survives her husband ami resides in the old 
homestead. No. 227 North Lafayette street. 
They had an only daughter, Mrs. G. F. Nevius, 
who died in 1882, leaving a daughter, who is 
now Mrs. Clinton Dodge, of California. Mr. 
Witherill had won and retained the esteem 
of the entire community, and his funeral was 
attended by his many warm friends. He was 
a member of Auten Post. No. 8, G. A. R„ 
and the members of that body also attended 
his funeral. The pall bearers were James 
Oliver, J. M. Studebaker, Major E. S. Reynolds. 
James Miller, A. G. dishing and H. C. Craw- 
ford. 



SOUTH BEND 



233 



ADAM BAEK. 

Among the oldest and most highly esteemed 
pioneer residents of South Bend, and one who 
for more than half a century was identified 
with its materal growth and progress, is Mr. 
Adam Baer, whose death occurred at his home 
in this city on August 23. 1899. Almost up to 
the time of his lamenteu death Mr. Baer had 
been in the enjoyment of vigorous health 
and of active intellectual power. He was 
suddenly stricken with paralysis and the end 
came to him peacefully and his spirit passed 
into the great unknown. Mr. Baer was a na- 
tive of Germany, and was born in 1823. When 
he was eight years of age his parents decided 
to come to America, and for a few years they 




ADAM BAER. 

resided in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Here 
the young man received his early schooling, 
and later his family came to Ohio. In 1S4U 
they removed to St. Joseph County, Indiana, 
and located on a farm of lbU acres, about one 
mile from North liberty. Here Mr. Baer's 
father and mother died, and the family, consist- 
ing of nine children, was separated and scat- 
tered. Mr. Baer, then quite a young man, 
came to South Bend, where he worked at the 
trade of a carpenter. In 1849, when the Cali- 
fornia gold excitement was at its height, he 
went with a number of young men to the 
El Dorado, where he remaineu for three years, 
engaged in mining the precious metal. He re- 
turned to Indiana in 1852 and purchased an 



excellent farm on Sumption Prairie, which 
he managed with rare skill and success for 
a number of years. Here he pursued the 
thrifty and comfortable life of a farmer until 
he had accumulated a competence, when he 
gave up agricultural life and came to South 
Bend to reside. Mr. Baer was an eminently 
successful man in all his business undertak- 
ings. He became an extensive holder of real 
estate, and owned a number of buildings in 
this city. He earned and ever retained the 
warm regard and esteem of citizens of South 
Bend, who recognized and admired his many 
admirable qualities. In his business dealings 
he was always conscientious and most thor- 
oughly upright, and as a man he was sunny 
and genial, and his chief desire was for the 
happiness and welfare of those around him. 
Mr. Baer was married to Miss Rebecca Hum- 
mel, and tnis most estimable lady still sur- 
vives him, and is highly esteemed by her large 
circle of friends in this city. He had one 
son, Frank Baer, by a former marriage, but 
he died some years ago. Mr. Baer had many 
friends among the leading and influential 
business men of this city, and his funeral was 
largely attended. The honorary pall bearers 
were James Oliver, Hon. Clem Studebaker, 
David Stover, Hon David R. Leeper, Hon. 
William Miller and William Wheeler. The 
active pall bearers were Myron Campbell. 
John Dunn, William Ruple. Joseph Turnock, 
John C. Knoblock and C. B. Vanpelt. After 
a life of usefulness and honor he has found 
eternal rest. 



LUCIUS G. TONG. 

Mr. Lucius G. Tong, the able and well known 
cashier of the St. Joseph County Savings 
Bank, and who has occupied that responsible 
position since 1882, is a native of Ohio. He 
was born In Carroll, Fairfield County, August 
1. 1842, and was the eldest of a family o^ 
five children. In his early years he acquired 
an excellent education, attending college and 
winning honors as a student. He assisted his 
father in his business later, and in 1863 he 
was engaged as a teacher at the University of 
Notre Dame, and for years was a professor 
in that institution. He studied law, was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and for years practiced his 
piofession in this city, and was regarded as 
one of the leading members of the local bar. 
In 1878 Mr. Tong was elected Mayor of South 
Bend by the Republican party, and his con- 
scientious and able conduct of that office en- 
deared him to the community, and so popular 



234 



SOUTH BEND. 



was he that the local Demociatic paper warm- 
i.v indorsed his renomination to that office. 
During that same year Mr. Tong was selected 
as the cashier of the St. Joseph County Savings 
Bank, to succeed T. J. Seixas, who was the 
originator of the institution, and he has proven 
a most valuable official. Mr. Tong is also 
an officer of the St. Joseph Loan and Trust 
company, an important adjunct ot the present 
bank. Mr. Tong is probably one of the best 
known men in South Bend. Quiet and modest, 
but of forceful character, and with a capacity 
ror delicate and responsible laoor almost mar- 
velous, he is one of the most active and in- 




LUCIUS G. TONG. 

defatigable workers in the business community 
to-day. In addition to his banking duties Mr. 
Tong also represents a number of prominent 
and responsible fiie insurance companies, and 
transacts a large business in fire underwriting. 
Courteous and able, thorough and conscien- 
tious, Mr. Tong is a progressive business man 
in the highest sense. He is a graceful and 
forceful writer on many subjects, and his 
knowledge of men and events is geneial and 
far-reaching. He married in 1873 a Miss Ball, 
of Lafayette, Indiana, and his family consists 
of four sons and two daughters. His residence 
is located at No. 207 South Scott street. 



HON. WILLIAM MILLER. 
During the eany yea:s of the history of this 
city no man was more prominent in every 
substantial effort to advance its material 
growth and progress than the late Hon. Wil- 
liam Miller, whose deeply lamented death oc- 
curred on May 2, 1879, at his home on La- 
layette street. He was a native of Virginia, 
and was born in Franklin County, in that state, 
April 1, 18u9. He was the sixth son of a 
tamily of tnirteen, and his pai enft were Tobias 
and fearah Miller, both of whom were well 
Known. When he was but little more than a 
year old his parents lemoved to Union County, 
Indiana, and here he grew to manhood, enjoy- 
ing such educational advantages as were af- 
lorded in those early days, and in assisting 
ms father. At the age of twenty-four he was 
married to iviiss Mary Miller, a daughter of 
Co.onei John Milier, of Virginia, and who had 
ueen an officer in the war of 1812. In May, 
±833, with his young wife, he came to St. 
uoseph county and located on a farm on Por- 
tage Prairie. Mr. Miller was a practical and 
enthusiastic agriculturalist of the progressive 
type, and did more to advance the agricultural 
interests of ot. Joseph County tnan any other 
n.an. His beautiful and well cultivated farm 
was known throughout the country as the best 
luanaged and most productive in this section 
ot the state, and his broad acres were rich 
in lruits and trees and beautifully embellished 
with carefully trimmed hedges. He was a 
stiong advocate ot the higher education of the 
youth ot the country, and ail of his children 
weie sent to the best institutions of learning. 
Mr. Milier was locatea here but a short time 
when he was elected Justice of the Peace, 
which office he held for several years, and in 
which he was distinguished tor the able and 
impartial manner in which he discharged its 
exacting and responsible duties. In 1844 he 
was eiected to repiesent the distiict in the 
State legislature, and proved so valuable and 
conscientious a law maker that he was re- 
elected for the second and third terms. During 
his legislative career he was largeiy instru- 
mental in secuiing well built and well managed 
institutions for the care ot the deaf and dumb, 
the blind and the insane, whose welfare here- 
tofore had been sadly neglected. He was an 
earnest advocate in the legislation which re- 
sulted in the establishment of the State Bank 
of Indiana, and was a prominent and influ- 
ential factor in the passage of the law which 
gave birth to that great financial institution. 
In 1858 he letired from active agricultural life 
and removed to this city, where he resided 



SOUTH BEND 



235 



until his death. He occupied the handsome 
brick residence on Lafayette street, which is 
now the official residence of the sheriff of the 
county, and in which he died. Mr. Miler al- 
ways took an active interest in city affairs, 
and for several teims was a member of the 
City Council, where he rendered yeoman serv- 
ice in advancing the interests of the munici- 
pality. He was an energetic and enthusiastic 
advocate of every movement tending to secure 
the location of manufactuiing interests in 
South Bend, which has had such a marked in- 
fluence in advancing the progress and insur- 
ing the permanent prosperity of our city. In 
1868 he was a prime mover in the movement 
to secure the location of the cabinet making 
plant of the Singer Sewing Machine Com- 
pany in this city. Through his efforts the 




HON. WILLIAM MILLER. 

citizens of South Bend weie induced to proffer 
the site for the factory buildings, the use of 
the water power of the race, and other ad- 
vantages, which successfully overcame the spe- 
cial inducements offered by Mishawaka, and 
led to the establishment of these gigantic 
works in this city. In politics he was originally 
a staunch Whig, but afterward was one of 
the organizers of the Republican party, and 
was a steadfast and .oyal supporter of its 
principles. Mr. Miller was a man of striking 
personality. Over six ieet in height, of large 
and powerful bui.d, and with an impressive 
face, he was a prominent figure in social and 



political life and was endeared to all who 
knew him and esteemed by the entire com- 
munity. His wife departed tnis life Septem- 
ber 29, 1885, and left six children to survive 
him and bear his honored name. His oldesi 
son, General Jonn F. MUler, also now de- 
ceased, was a most gallant orhcer in the civil 
war. He was Colonel of the Twenty-ninth 
Indiana Volunteers. He was conspicuous for 
his bravery, and was wounded several times 
and suffered the loss of an eye. He was pro- 
moted a Major General, and at the close of the 
war was made Collector of the Port of San 
Francisco, and afterward elected United 
States Senator irom California, and died whi.e 
holding that office. Another son, Henry Clay 
Miller, also went to California, and at his 
death, in 1892, was Auditor in the Custom 
House at San Francisco. William H. Miller 
is a prominent manufacturer in this city, and 
Horace G. Mii.er is the present able Postmaster 
of South Bend, and is also engaged in seve.al 
manufacturing enterprises. Isaac Newton 
Miller, another son, is an agriculturist, lesid- 
ing in Olive Township, and iast fall was elected 
to the office of County Cimmissioner. His 
daughter, Martha, was married to Moses But- 
terworth, of Laporte, and now lives in Chicago. 
Mr. Miller lived to the honorable age of three 
score years and ten, and his death was deeply 
mourned by all. He was a member of the 
iOtal lodge and encampment of Odd Fellows, 
and the Hon. Schuyler Colfax performed the 
.ast fraternal rites at his funeral. 



ISAAC FRY. 



Among the many men, now passed away, 
who have held an honored place in the busi- 
ness life of South Bend, and been prominent 
in its best citizenship, must be mentioned Mr. 
Isaac Fry, who for forty years was a resident 
here. Mr. Fry was boin in Berks County, 
Pennsylvania, near the City of Reading, No- 
vember 16, 1835, and was the youngest of a 
family of eight children. His father, Jacob 
Fry, was engaged in the profession of school 
teaching, and his mother, Elizabeth (Ludwig) 
Fry, was a refined lady. When but a boy his 
parents removed to Schuylkill County, wheie 
he lived until 1860. He received his early 
education in the public schools, and through 
home study under the tutelage of his father. 
When a young man he learned the trade of 
shoe making, and came to South Bend in 
1860, and for a time followed his trade. He 
then accepted employment with the Stude- 
bakers, and for fourteen yea: s was connected 



236 



SOUTH BEND. 



with that establishment. For a short time 
he was engaged in the butcher business, and 
in 1884 began in the business of cement con- 
tracting. .In this line he met with success. 




and evincing but little promise of the pro- 
gressive and important city it has since be- 
come. Here the young man was reared amid 
the primitive conditions of pioneer life, ex- 
panding with the giowth of the city and par- 
taking of its ambitions and progressive spirit. 
His father established and conducted the first 
public tavern known in this locality, and many 
of the substantial early institutions of this 
city are due to the energy, the generosity 
and the public spirit of the Coquillard family. 
Mr. Benjamin Coquillard was a resident of 
South Bend almost from his birth to his death, 
a period of over seventy years, with the ex- 
ception of the interval from 1S50 to 1859, 
when ne went to California to better his for- 
tunes. In 1847, wnen a boy eighteen years of 
age, he accompanied his uncle, Alexis Coquil- 
iaid, when he was engaged to safely conduct 
a band of about 800 Miami Indians and Potta- 
watomie Indians from Indiana to the then 
new western reservation in Kansas. The jour- 
ney was fraught with many dangers, and was 
marked by numerous adventures of a stirring 
nature. For over a quarter of a century Mr. 
Coquillard was engaged in the livery business 
in this city, and was one of the best known 



ISAAC FRY. 

and followed it until his death, which occurred 
March 2, 1900. Mr. Fry completed many of 
the largest public and private contiacts here. 
He was a careful and honored business man, 
and his word was considered equal to his 
bond. He was married in lSb7 to Miss Anna 
Kiefer, of Pine Grove, Pennsylvania, and be- 
sidts his estimable wife, left one daughter, 
Mrs. Vitalis D. Stanley, wife of Mr. Frank G. 
Stanley. 



BENJAMIN COQUILLARD. 
On the eighth day of November, 1899, Mr. 
Benjamin Coquillard, the oldest inhabitant of 
St. Joseph County, in point of continuous 
residence, departed this life at his residence, 
No. 130 South Chapin street, in this city. Mr. 
Coquillard was a native of Detroit, Michigan, 
and was born August 2, 1829. He was the son 
of Benjamin Coquillard, and a nephew of 
Alexis Coquillard, who was the first white 
man to settle in South Bend, and who attained 
prominence as an Indian trader in this vicinity. 
Mr. Coquillard's father lemoved with his fam- 
ily lo South Bend in 1829, when it was but a 
straggling village, with but few inhabitants, 




BENJAMIN COIJUILLAUD. 

citizens and business men of South Bend. In 
1893 he retired from active business, and en- 
joyed the esteem of his friends and the com- 
munity until his death. Mr. Coquillard was 
married at Notre Dame, October 1, 1803, to 



SOUTH BEND. 



237 



Miss Josephine M. Saile, of near South Bend, 
and his estimable widow and two daughters, 
Pranie H. and M. Elsie Coquillard, survive 
him. In his death there passed away a sturdy 
pioneer, a public spirited citizen and the old- 
est settler in the city. 



BENJAMIN P. DUNN. 

Mr. Benjamin F. Dunn, who has been ac- 
tively engaged in the real estate and loan 
business in this city for a number of years, 
is well and prominently known in the com- 
munity. He is a native of St. Joseph County, 
and was born June 14, 1833. He is tne son 
oi Reynolds Dunn, who was a native of New 
Jersey, and who came to Ohio at an early 




Peak. Colorado, where, meeting with but in- 
different success, he returned home the fol- 
lowing season. In 1863 he engaged in the dry 
goods b\isiness under the firm name of Dunn 
& Zimmerman, and later with his brother, 
John H. Dunn, as Dunn Bros., in the same 
establishment. Later he engaged in the fur- 
niture manufacturing business with his 
brother-in-law. Robert Myler, on the East 
Race, until 1873, when he closed out the busi- 
ness. Since that time Mr. Dunn has been 
engaged in the real estate and loan business, 
in which he has continued to the present 
time, and in which he has been quite success- 
ful. Mr. Dunn and Mr. A. J. Home platted the 
town and are the owners of River Park, a 
beautiful subdivision on the North Side. He 
has been connected with the St. Joseph Coun- 
ty Savings Bank for a number of years, and 
is one of the trustees of that institution. 
He is a member of the Commercial-Athletic 
Club, and has been connected with the First 
M. E. Church of this city since he was quite 
a young man. Mr. Dunn is a practical and 
ccnscientious business man of high standing, 
and enjoys the esteem of the community. 
His excellent judgment of real estate values 
has been gained by long experience, and he 
is an adviser of the bank in matters of real 
estate loans. Mr. Dunn was a member of the 
Board of Education from 1S83 to 1894, and was 
an important factor in the preliminary labors 
of establishing the Public Library in this 
city. He was married in 1864 to Miss Mary 
V. Hamilton, a native of Ohio, and his family 
consists of three daughters, Mrs. J. G. Schurtz, 
of Whue Pigeon, Michigan; Mrs. Fred A. Mil- 
ler, of this city, and Miss Blanche Dunn, who 
resides at home with her parents at No. 203 
South Lafayette street. Mr. Dunn's business 
office is located at No. 117 North Main street. 



BENJAMIN F. DUNN. 

day, and afterward removed to St. Joseph 
County. His mother was Phoebe (Tatman) 
Dunn, and his parents were married in Ohio. 
Mr. Dunn, as a boy, attended the country 
schools in the vicinity oi his home, and after- 
ward the public schools in South Bend. His 
first essay in business life was as a clerk in 
the store of John Brownheld, who was then 
the leading merchant in this city, where he 
remained several years. In 1860 Mr. Dunn 
was, with a number of young men of this city, 
seized with the gold fever, and went to Pike's 



ALEXANDER STAPLES. 

For over sixty years Mr. Alexander Staples 
has been a citizen of the City of South Bend, 
and for almost half a century he has been 
identified with its material growth and 
progress. Mr. Staples was born in South 
Bend, in a house which stood at the corner 
of Michigan and Jefferson streets, June 10, 
1840. His father, Mr. Ralph Staples, whose 
death occurred by accident in 1864, was a 
pioneer resident of South Bend, its second 
Postmaster and at one time Sheriff of St. 
Joseph County. He was a native of Maine, and 
with his mother, Hannah (Cromwell) Staples, 



238 



SOUTH BEND. 



a descendent of Oliver Cromwell, now living 
in Minneapolis at the honored age of eighty- 
six years, traveled by ox team from Me..ne 
to Ohio in 1833, and in 1S36 came to South 
Jend. Alexander Stapes was one of a family 
of eleven children, and received his early edu- 
cation in the old district school at St. Joseph 
and Wayne streets, the building of which was 
removed, and now stands on the north side 
of Colfax avenue, the first house east of Elm 
street When but a boy Mr. Staples learned 
the carpenter's trade, and in 1861 wo:ked on 
the old jail. in 1863. with Mr. Benjamin 
White, he established the firm of White & 
Staples in the business of moving buildings. 




ALEXANDER STAPLES. 

in which line he has since and is now engaged. 
In the fall of 1863 he en.'isted in the Twenty- 
first Indiana Battery and went to the front. 
He saw service at Columbia Tennessee, and 
participated in tne battle of Nashville. He 
was mustered out of service June 26, 1865, 
and leturned to South Bend and engaged in 
the moving business. The following yea:- he 
purchased the interest of Mr. White and con- 
ducted the business alone until 1895, when 
he admitted his son, Crawford Staples, f 
partnership, under the style of Alex. Staples 
& Son. During his long years of active life 
Mr. Staples has shown engineering skill of 
the highest merit, and has moved large build- 
ings and plants in various parts of the coun- 



try. One of his greatest efforts, and one that 
gave him fame as a moving engineer, was the 
placing in position of the standpipe for the 
waterworks here. The pipe, five feet in di- 
ameter, two hundred feet high and weighing 
43.382 pounds, was raised by Mr. Staples, with 
tackle of his own make, and placed in position. 
Engineers from all paits ot the country said it 
was an impossible task. Mr. Staples also 
moved the great iron ore carriers for loading 
vessels at Duluth for the Pioneer Fuel Com- 
pany of Minneapolis. He has moved build- 
ings in Chicago, Cleveland and other cities, 
and his work has always been successfully 
accomplished. Mr. Staples has been a most 
active business man of the progressive type, 
and has achieved a well deserved success. 
He has been twice married, his first wife be- 
ing Celeste Alexander, wnom he married in 
1866, and who died in 1883. He was married 
the second time to Miss A'mira Lytle, on 
June 29, 1886. Mrs. Staples is a native of 
Pennsylvania, and was born at Saltsburg, of 
Scotch-Irish parentage. Mrs. Staples was 
educated at Saltsburg Academy, and at the 
Parkwood Academy, at Parkwood, Pennsyl- 
vania. She has always been united with the 
United Presbyterian Church, and an earnest 
worker in the cause of temperance. She is 
State Superintendent of Christian Citizenship, 
an organization that is doing excellent work 
in the religious and temperance field. 



WILLIAM L. BARRETT. 

One of the oldest and most highly honored 
of the pioneer residents of South Bend was Mr. 
William L. Barrett, whose lamented death oc- 
curred in this city March 22, 1899, at the vener- 
abel age of eighty-nine years. Mr. Barrett was 
a native of "Vermont, and was born in Water- 
ford, Ca'edonia County, March 10, 1810. He 
was the son of John and Susanna Barrett, who 
were early settlers in the state. His ancestors 
were of the famous Bosworth family, which 
came to America in the Mav Flower, and first 
landed on Plymouth Rock. They came of that 
sturdy race which has made this great re- 
public possible. His parents had thirteen 
children and all were reared in the true Chris- 
tian spirit. During the war with Eng'and in 
1812, and soon after the battle of Lake Cham- 
p'ain they removed from Vermont, and located 
in Whitehall. N. Y. They remained there hut 
a short time, and after a temporary residence 
in the towns of Barton and Groveland. th°v 
settled in Ossean, Allegheny County, N. Y.. in 



SOUTH BEND. 



239 



1818. Here Mr. Barrett was reared and re- 
ceived his early education, and here also he 
learned the trade of a jeweler, with which voca- 
tion he was identified during nearly all of his 
after life. In 1832 he established himself in 
business on his own account in Franklinville, 
Catteraugus County, N. Y., and was quite suc- 
cessful. In 1834 he was married to Miss Har- 
riet Newton, at Sweden, Monroe County, N. Y., 
and in 1835 he decided to come west. His first 
point of destination was Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
where he had intended to locate, and he com- 
menced the wearisome journey from his home, 
amid a storm of sleet and rain which would 
have deterred a less resolute man. After a 
journey of twenty days, which was made partly 
by stage, by steamboat, by private conveyance 




WILLIAM L. BARRETT. 

and on foot, he arrived in South Bend on Sat- 
urday October 18. Here he visited an old ac- 
quaintance in the jewelry business in the East, 
Mr. A. P. Willard, who was located here, and 
who induced him to work for him at the watch 
business, which at that time was sadly in need 
of the services of an expert in that line. Mr. 
Barrett readily made numerous acquaintances, 
and was soon made to realize the superior ad- 
vantages of South Bend, even over the more 
pretentious claims of Milwaukee and Chicago. 
Consequently he decided to remain here, make 
his home, and establish himself in business, 
which he followed continuously and successful- 
ly until but a few years prior to his death. 



when his failing powers compelled him to re- 
linquish active business. Mr. Barrett acquired 
considerable real estate in Chicago, and was 
at one time, the owner of the property where 
the post-office now stands. Mr. Barrett for 
nine years during his life resided in Chicago, 
and made the journey to and from that city by 
the slow and lumbering methods of the old 
stage coach. He was an energetic business 
man and always advocated every measure that 
would promote the substantial welfare of 
South Bend, and its commercial progress. He 
was an earnest and prominent member of the 
Masonic fraternity for many years. He was 
made a member of St. Joseph Lodge, No. 45, in 
1842, and was the first candidate initiated into 
the lodge after its instituton. He was an act- 
ive member of this lodge until 1863, when with 
a number of the older members of the order, 
he withdrew and founded South Bend Lodge 
No. 294. F. & A. M. Mr. Barrett was selected 
as the first Master of the lodge, and served con- 
tinuously a number of terms. He was one of 
the best posted Masons in this section of the 
country, and was a recognized authority on all 
important questions connected with that fra- 
ternity. In 1847 he became a member of the 
Royal Arch Chapter, and was a regu'ar atten- 
dant at all the meetings of both lodge and 
chapter until unable to attend by reason of the 
infirmities of age. For several years prior to 
his death he was always an honored guest at 
all masonic gatherings and functions, which 
were regarded as incomplete without his pres- 
ence. Mr. Barrett's first wife died in this city 
May 28, 1841, leaving him with three children, 
only one of whom is now living, Mrs. Emma 
Malloy, now of Port Townsend, Washington. 
On September 12, 1851, he was married to Miss 
Harriet Eaker, in this city, and this most esti- 
mable lady departed this life April 11, 1898. By 
his second marriage Mr. Barrett had five chil- 
dren, Mrs. D. C. Hogue, who died June 14, 1891, 
Edward Barrett, who died in 1887, William E. 
Barrett, now of Grand Rapids, Michigan, John 
C. Barrett, of this city and Miss Mary Barrett. 
Mr. Barrett was a life long and earnest member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which 
his honored mother was a member for over 
fifty years. He was one of the most genial and 
courteous of men, and was warmly regarded by 
all who knew him. His friends were legion, 
and in Masonic circles no man stood higher or 
was more universally beloved than Past Master 
William L. Barrett. His funeral was conducted 
with Masonic honors, and was attended by a 
large concourse of sorrowing friends, brothers 
and acquaintances. The pall bearers were 
John Gallagher, L. H. Johnson, John Hartman, 



2-40 



SOUTH BEND. 



George Ford, A. Defreese and Samuel T. Apple- 
gate. In his death the Masonic fraternity lost 
one of its most vamed members, and the com- 
munity a citizen of honor, who had won and re- 
tained the esteem of all. 



GEORGE E. WOLF. 

Mr. George E. Wolf, manager of the magnifi- 
cent Oliver Hotel of South Bend, is a hotel man 
of long experience and ability. He is a native 
of Terre Haute, Ind.. having been born in that 
city September 9. 1865. His father, George H. 
Wolf was a successtul business man theie, and 




GEORGE E. WOLF. 

his mother was Mena (Gravemaier) Wolf), botn 
parents being natives ot Germany. As a boy 
young Wolf attended the Greenwood school, 
and later the Terre Haute High School, and at 
the age of thirteen began actual business life in 
a grocery store. In 1S79 he took charge of the 
cigar stand in the Terie Haute House, and from 
that date began his hotel experience. After a 
year he became night cleik of the hotel, then 
day clerk, and in 1S!?S was made cashier and 
bookkeeper. When Mr. Charles Baur became 
the proprietor of the Terie Haute House, April 
1, 1890, Mr. Wolf was made manager, and con- 
tinued in that position until November 1899 
when he came to South Bend to assume the 
management of the New Oliver, which was 
opened the following month. The opening of 



the splendid New Oliver Hotel on December 20, 
L899, was an important event in the history of 
South Bend, and one that will long be remem- 
bered. This magnificent structuie is one of 
the best built and most handsomely equipped 
and furnished hotels in the United States, and 
its fame has extended to all parts of the coun- 
try and Europe. The Oliver was opened with 
a grand reception given by Mr. James Oliver 
and family, the owners of the building, to 
which over three thousand of their friends re- 
sponded, and were liberally and successfully 
entertained, and was regularily opened for 
business the following day, since which time it 
has enjoyed a liberal and well deserved patron- 
age. Mr. Wolf is an able and experienced 
manager and understands every detail of pro- 
gressive hotel management, and his ability at 
handling and serving large assembles is well 
known. He is prompt, active, unremitting 
and progressive in every department of this 
magnificent fire proof hostelry, and his thor- 
ough manner and genial ways have made him 
popular with all. Mr. Wolf was married May 
14. 1890, to Miss Elinor H. Finkbiner, a most 
estimable lady of Terre Haute, Indiana. Mr. 
Wolf is a member of the Indiana Hotel Keepers 
Association. He is widely known and popular 
and a public spirited citizen of South Bend. 



WILBER E. GORSUCH. 

Mr. Wilber E. Gorsuch, one of South Bend's 
widely known men, and chief of the Police 
Depaitment, was born at Piqua. Ohio. May 21. 
1843. His father, Isaac Gorsuch, now living 
in this city at an honored age, is a native of 
Baltimore. Md., and his mother was Mary 
(Gass) Gorsuch. When a child his parents 
removed to Fletcher, Ohio, and when he was 
but four years of age they came to South Bend. 
.Mr. Gorsuch received his education in the pub- 
lic schools in this city, and then engaged in 
farming, which he continued until the breaking 
out of the civil war. In August, 1862, he en- 
listed as a member of Co. C, 73d. Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served with the regiment 
except for a few months in 1863 when doing 
detached duty. The regiment saw active 
service under Buell and Rosecans in Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee, and during April, 1863, it 
became a part of Streight's Provisional Brigade 
and took part in that famous laid, which re- 
sulted in capture to the entire command near 
Rome, Georgia. The officers were retained as 
prisoneis of war, the men were paroled and 
later exchanged and sent to the front, and being 
without officers did ganison duty until expira- 



SOUTH BEND 



241 



tion of their term of service July 1, 1865. Mr. 
Gorsuch returned at once to South Bend and 
took up the occupation of farming for a time 
and was then in the employ of the Eagle Manu- 
facturing Company, for several years, and then 
entered the employ of the Tribune P;inting 




WILBER B. GORSUCH. 

Company remaining with them until April, 1S95. 
at which time he again took up farming and 
went to live in German Township. Mr. Gor- 
such is one of the best known men in St. 
Joseph County and a genial and courteous 
gentleman. He has served as township trus- 
tee of Portage Township. He has been a 
member of the Grand Army of the .Republic 
since 1866, and is a member of Norman Eddy 
Post, No. 579. He has been a member of 
Crusade Lodge, No. 14, Knights of Pythias 
since its organization. Mr. Gorsuch is now 
secretary of the St. Joseph County Soldiers' 
Monument Association, and is a member of 
the Commercial Athletic Club. Mr. Gorsuch 
was married in November, 1866, to Miss Loretta 
J. Morgan, a daughter of Mr. Charles Morgan, 
a pioneer resident of St. Joseph County. 



HENRY STUDEBAKER. 

Mr. Henry Studebaker, whose death occurred 
on March 2 1895, was one of the founders of 
the great industrial enterprise known to the 
world as the Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing 
Company, and was well and prominently known 



in the community during his useful and noble 
life. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
was born near Gettysburg, Adams County, Oct. 
5, 1826. He was the sixth of a family of thir- 
teen children born to John and Rebecca Stude- 
baker, and his brothers Clem, John M., Peter 
E.. and Jacob P. Studebaker were all promi- 
nently identified with the mammoth wagon 
woiks which bears their name. When Henry 
was nine years of age the family emigrated to 
Ashland, Ohio, traveling in a wagon built by 
his father, who had suffered reverses in Penn- 
sylvania. He was apprenticed to a country 
blacksmith, and worked at the forge in sum- 
mer and attended school in winter, and later 
came home and finished his trade with his 
father who was an expert blacksmith. In 1847 
having saved enough money to purchase a 
horse, the young man staited out to seek his 
fortune in the West and came to Goshen, Ind., 
where he worked at his trade for several 
months for his board. Tiring of this, and 
being without money, he walked the entire 
distance back to his home in Ohio. In 1850 




HENRY STUDEBAKER. 

his brother Clem, made a trip to South Bend 
and located here, and the following year the 
family followed him traveling in two wagons 
over the new and promising country. In 1852 
Henry and Clem, with their joint funds amount- 
ing to sixty-eight dollars opened a blacksmith 
shop for horseshoeing and wagon making at 
Michigan and Jefferson streets, under the firm 
name of H. & C. Studebaker. Both young men 



242 



SOUTH BEND 



were energetic and ambitious to succeed — they 
worked early and late — and though their pro- 
gress was slow at first, they added to their 
savings and their business year by year, and in 
1858 the business had mateiially enlarged. The 
hard work at the forge and bench, however, 
affected his health and strength, and in that 
year Henry disposed of his interests in the 
business to his brother John M. and turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. He pur- 
chased a large tiact of land adjoining the city 
on the South East, and made his home there 
until his death. He was an industrious, far 
seeing, and economical man and year by year 
his farm improved and his financial prosperity 
increased. His habits and inclinations never 
permitted him to indulge in tobacco or alcohol 
and he reared his children to the same lofty 
standards of morality. He was married in 
May 1852 to Miss Susan Studybaker. a daughter 
of Samuel Studybaker. and six children were 
boi-n to them, Mrs. A. W. Bowman, Samuel W., 
Edith, Clem W. and Mrs J, M. Chillas are now 
living, and Laura who died in 1876. The mother 
died June 8. 1871, and in 1873 Mr. Stude- 
baker was married to Miss Priscilla Kriegh- 
baum. a daughter of William Krieghbaum, and 
a sister of Elder Hiram W. Krieghbaum, and 
this most estimable lady is still living, and en- 
joys the friendship and esteem of a large circle 
of friends. She is the mother of four children, 
D. Adele, William, Peter C, and Arthur. She 
is a most devoted mother to ail of the children, 
and in return is loved and honored by them all. 
Mr. Studebaker was a member of the Society 
of Dunkards. and always delighted in enter- 
taining the brothel s and elders of the society 
at his home. He always maintained a deep 
interest in the success of his brothers, and was 
one of the most genial, affectionate and out- 
spoken of men. His sympathies were always 
with the unfortunate and his charity was great. 
His funeral was largely attended and all who 
knew him were saddened at his death. 



ELMER CROCKETT. 

Mr. Elmer Crockett, the president and 
business manager of the Tribune Printing 
Company, has since his early boyhood been 
identified with the progress and development 
of South Bend and of its neighboring city of 
Mishawaka. Mr. Crockett is a native of St. 
Joseph County, and was born September 1, 
1844. He is the son of Shellim Crockett and 
Louise (Ireland) Crockett, and is a descen- 
dant of the famous Kentucky pioneer Davy 
Crockett. His mother died in 1S4S, and the 
family afterward removed to South Bend. 



Mr. Crockett however lived with his uncle 
S. I. H. Ireland at Mishawaka for a number 
of years. He received his education in the 
public schools of Mishawaka, and attended 
the Seminary and Nortnern Indiana College 
at South Bend. During the civil war he en- 
listed in the 138th Indiana Volunteers, and 
when mustered out of the service, he went to 
Mishawaka where he finished learning the 
printer's art, in the office of the Mishawaka 
Enterprise. In 1867 he returned to South 
Bend which he has since made his home. For 
years he was engaged as foreman in the office 
ol the St. Joseph County Register, founded 
by the late vice-president Schuyler Colfax, and 




ELMER CKOC'KETT. 

afterwaiu in connection with Mr. A. Beal, and 
his brother-in-law, the late Alfred B. Miller, he 
purchased the office and paper and the firm 
became Beal, Miller & Co. In 1872 Messrs. 
Miller and Crockett founded The South Bend 
Tribune which is now one of the leading jour- 
nals in the state, and an important factor In 
the Republican party. Later the Tribune 
Pi inting Company was incorporated. Mr. Miller 
acting as president, and Mr. Crockett vice- 
president and superintendent. Mr. Miller died 
in 1892 and Mr. Crockett became president and 
business manager of the company, which posi- 
tions he now holds. In 1S88 M;. Crockett was 
appointed post master of South Bend, by Presi- 
dent Harrison, and proved a most valuable and 
popular official and instituted many important 



SOUTH BEND. 



243 



reforms in that office. Mr. Crockett is prom- 
inent in Masonic circles and was Grand High 
Priest of the Grand Chapter of Intuana during 
1889-90. In the campaigns of 1898 and 1900 he 
served as a member of the State Republican 
Campaign Committee, and was chairman of the 
State Newspaper Bureau performing yeoman 
service in that capacity. He has always taken 
an active part in political affairs, is a con- 
sistent and unswerving Republican, and is a 
leader of acknowledged ability in the state. He 
is an active member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic and is a past commander of Auten 
Post No. 8, of this city. During 1896 he was 
Senior vice Department Commander of Indiana. 
Mr. Crockett is a member of the First Presby- 
terian church, is an elder of the church and is 
the Superintendent of the Sabbath school. He 
has also been president of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, and has always been an 
ardent promoter of its interests. He is a pro- 
gressive citizen, straightforward and energetic 
in his business methods and genial and court- 
eous in his manner. He is thoroughly alive to 
the best interests of the city, and has been 
connected with every public movement tend- 
ing to advance the growth and welfare of 
the city, and has ever been regarded as a 
wise and able counsellor in all matters ot pub- 
lic importance. He was selected as a mem- 
ber of the Citizens' Advisory Committee during 
the building of the new Court House and his 
services in connection with this committee were 
invaluable. Mr. Crockett was married in 
1868 to Miss Anna Miller, daughter of Ex-Sheriff 
B. F. Miller, now deceased, who was one of 
the pioneers of this city and his family con- 
sists of a son and daughter Charles E. Crockett 
and Miss Ethel Crockett. 



CAPT. DAVID B. CREVISTON. 

For a number of years Capt. David B. Crev- 
iston was prominent in commercial circles 
and was a successful merchant in this city. He 
had a large circle of friends and was highly 
esteemed in the community, and his death 
which occurred on November 23, 1893, was 
mourned by all. He had been in ill health 
for a long time but his death came suddenly 
and peacefully at the last and he passed 
serenely into eternal rest. Nearly his entire 
life was spent in this city except for the years 
in which he was engaged in gallant and heroic 
service for his country during the late civil 
war. He was born near Rum Village, in this 
county. January 18, 1837, and was the eldest of 
thiiteen children born to William and Jane 
Creviston, who came here from Pennsylvania in 



1833. His early education was acquired at 
Crown Point, Lake County, Indiana, and he 
commenced the active battle of life at the 
age of sixteen years. When the war of the 
rebellion occurred Mr. Creviston was one ot 
the first to offer his services to his country, 
and enlisted for three months service. On 
returning home his patriotism was more thor- 
oughly aroused, and he organized Company D, 
of the Ninth Indiana Volunteers, which was 
mustered at Laporte. He was commissioned 




CAPT. DAVID B. CKKVISTON. 

as Captain of the Company and valiantly 
served in that position until the battle of 
Chickamauga. in whicn he was seriously 
wounded. He was sent home and by careful 
nursing and loving care was restored to health. 
He at once reported again for duty, but being 
unfitted for active service, by reason of his 
wounds, he was made the quartermaster of his 
regiment, and ably served in that capacity until 
the end of the war. He then returned home 
and for several years was engaged in farming 
on the old Haight farm just south of the city. 
In 1872 he was elected Treasuier of St. Joseph 
County, and fulfilled the duties of that responsi- 
ble position so well that he was chosen for a 
second term. He was a most popular and 
efficient public officer, and later was selected 
by County Treasurer Lang as his deputy. He 
was then engaged by a prominent local manu- 
facturing company as a traveling salesman 
throughout the west for several years. A few 
yeais previous to his death he formed a part- 



244 



SOUTH BEND. 



nership with John Singler, and engaged in 
the hardware business under the firm name 
of Singler & Creviston. This business was a 
successful one from the outset and the firm 
soon became the leading merchants, in its line, 
in the county. Mr. Creviston was always an 
active and energetic business man, popular 
with his customers and highly esteemed in the 
community, and he attended to his business up 
to the day of his death. On February 7, 1871, 
he was married to Miss Alwilda E. Boone, a 
daughter of Mr. Philip B. Boone of this city, 
and this most estimable lady still survives 
him, soothed and comforted by the affection 
of her children and enjoys the warm regard 
of a large circle of friends. With her two sons. 
Arthur E., and Charles P. Creviston, and her 
two daughters. Clai a L., and Bessie, she resides 
in the old homestead at No. 708 West Colfax 
Avenue. Mr. Creviston's life was one of use- 
fulness and honor and its ending was noble 
and sublime. His funeral was largely at- 
tended, his comrades of Auten Post No. 8, G. 
A. R., and his loving brothers of South Bend 
Lodge No. 29, I. O. O. F., following him to his 
last resting place with imposing ceremonial. 



HON. GEORGE H. ALWARD. 

The Hon. George Henry Alward, whose death 
occurred in this city on November 11, 1SS5. 
was a prominent and highly esteemed citizen 
of South Bend, who filled a number oi import- 
ant public positions in St. Joseph county. Judge 
Alward, as he was called, was born in Scipio, 
Cayuga County, New York, February 24, 1834. 
He was a son of 'Squire Abigail Alward, 
who were quite prominent in that section of 
New York state. His father was a native of 
Somerset County, New Jersey, but removed to 
New York, when he was a young man, and 
there married Miss Abigail Boughton, a daugh- 
ter of John Boughton, an influential citizen of 
the county. In 1855 Judge Alward came to 
South Bend which he made his home until his 
death. He was essentially a self-made man. 
As a youth he was a close student, and ac- 
quired an excellent education, pursuing a wide 
range of study, and was selected as a school 
teacher when a mere youth. He taught several 
terms in Allegheny county. New York, and 
was regarded as a most excellent instructor. 
When he came to this city he was engaged for 
several years as a clerk in the store of A. G. 
Cushing, and during that time he diligently 
pursued the study of the law, fitting himself 
for the bar, and began to practice that profes- 
sion in 1867. He associated himself with Alvln 



S. Dunbar, and the firm of Dunbar & Alward 
was one of the best known law firms in North- 
ern Indiana, and was only dissolved when Judge 
Alward re.inquished his practice to enter upon 
the duties of clerk of the Circuit Court He 
was first appointed Deputy County Auditor 
under the late W. J. Holloway, and also held 
the offices of City Clerk and judge of the 
Municipal Court. In 1883 he was elected clerk 
of the Circuit Court, which office he held at the 
time of his death. He was a staunch and 
earnest member of the Republican party ana 
no man stood higher in his party or in the 
community than did Judge A ward. He was 
a genial gentleman, cultured and refined, ana 




HON. GEO. H. ALWARD. 

was an ideal citizen in every sense of the 
term. He was an active supporter of the 
church, and a prominent member of the Masonic 
fraternity. He was a thirty-two degree mason 
of the Scottish Rite, a Master of St. Joseph 
Lodge No. 45, F. & A. M.; High Priest of South 
Bend chapter No. 29, R. A. M., and Eminent 
Commander of South Bend Commandery. 
Knights Templar. On September 23, 185/, he 
was married to Miss Martha u. Hodgkinson. 
the accomplished daughter of Mr. James D. 
Hodgkinson, who was a native of England, and 
settled in Berrien county, at an early day. He 
left four sons, George H. Alward, Deputy 
County Clerk; James S. Alward, Harry B. A.- 
ward, and Albert F. Alward, who is Deputy 
County Surveyor, all of whom a:e well known 
in this city. Mrs. Alward who still survives 



SOUTH BEND 



245 



her husband is a lady of rare womanly qualities 
and superior intellectual attainments and in 
her home life was pre-eminent in rendering 
the domestic life ot her husband and chiidien 
most happy and elevating. Judge Alwaid's 
death was a serious loss to the community, 
ana his funeral was attended by a large con- 
course of his friends who had known and loved 
him while in life. Funeral services were held 
in the First Methodist Episcopal church, and 
he was buried with the impressive ceremonial 
of the Masonic fraternity. The pall bearers 
were Elmer Crockett, John H. Dunn, A. Gaylor, 
of Mishawaka, Hon. Clem Studebaker, Myron 
Campbell and H. C. Bond. 



DR. WALTER A. HAGER. 
Among the prominent and successful prac- 
titioners of this citv who have gained a most 
enviable position in that important profession, 
must be mentioned Dr. Walter A. Hager, who 
has been known to the community of South 




• '* 8 ^ 

w 




DK. WALTER A. HAGEU. 

Bend since 1893. Dr. Hager is a native of 
Palermo, Ontario, and was born August 23, 
1S63. He is a son of Addison Hager, a 
prominent grain merchant, of Burlington, On- 
tario, and Maria iSmith) Hager. The young 
man attended the public schools of Hamilton, 
and early engaged in the drug business in 
Orangeville, for four years, as a clerk. He 
attended the Toronto College of Pharmacy and 



graduated in 1883, with the degree of Ph. D. 
He remained in the drug business in Hamilton, 
until 18S8 when he went to Philadelphia, Pa., 
where he became a student of Jefferson Medical 
College, and graduated as an M. D. in 1891. 
For sixteen months alter his graduation he 
was resident physician and surgeon at Jeffer- 
son Hospital, where he gained most valuable 
experience. In 1893 ne came to South Bend 
and commenced the active practice of his pro- 
fession, and from the outset was lemarkably 
successful. After mature consideration Dr. 
Hager, in 1898, decided to devote himself large- 
ly to the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat, and in order to qualify himse.f 
more thoroughly for this delicate and responsi- 
ble practice, he went to Philadelphia, and 
from June to November, 1899, he attended the 
Polyclinic, the Wills Eye hospital, and the 
Jefferson Hospital, and studied c.osely in the 
departments of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 
In November of that year he went aoroad, 
first going to Utrecht, Hoi. and, where he 
studied under the immediate instruction of 
Prof. Snellin, the famous eye specialist. He 
then went to Vienna, Austria, wheie he attended 
the hosp.tal in clinical practice, and both 
studied and practiced under the direction of 
the celebrated eye specialists, Profs Fuchs and 
Schnable; Prof. Chiari, nose and mroat; Prof. 
Poulitzer for one year and also under the 
noted pathologist Prof. Nendorfer. He 

devoted four months to active work iu 
the clinics and laboratories of that city, 
and then went to Paris, where he enjoyed the 
advantages of the clinics conducted by Pi of. 
De Wecker, the great authority on the eye, who 
also has a finely appointed hospital in Paris. 
Dr. Hager then went to Loncion, England, and 
devoted four months to active work in the 
Royal London Opthalmic Hospital, under such 
leading spirits as Profs. Tay, Maicus Gunn, 
William Lang, B. Silcock, J. B. Lawford, A. S. 
Morton, S. Treacher Collins and Holmes 
Spicer. Returning to America he again at- 
tended the Wills Eye Hopsital, the Polyclinic 
and the Jefferson Hospitals in Philadelphia, 
and Prof. Knapp's clinic of New \ork, where 
he devoted himself to practical work in these 
important departments of medical science. On 
January 15, 1901, after a short visit to his 
Canadian home, Dr. Hager returned to South 
Bend resolved to confine his practice to the 
treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and 
to practically relinquish the general piactice 
of medicine. In this he has been very suc- 
cessful and is already a recognized authority, 
even among his professional associates. Dr. 
Hager has secured from the best makers in 



m 



SOUTH BEND 



Europe, the finest instruments and appliances 
used in these particular branches of practice, 
and his office at Lafayette and Washington 
streets is equipped with every modern appli- 
ance for successful treatment of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat. He is a memoer of the 
Ameiican Medical Association, and the State. 
Kankakee Valley, and St. Joseph County Medi- 
cal Societies, and of the Indiana and Com- 
mercial-Athletic Clubs. He is popular in 
leading social circles and has hosts of friends 
both in his profession and the community at 
large. 



HON. SCHUYLER COLFAX. SH. 
One of the most honored citizens of South 
Bend, and one who achieved national distinc- 
tion was the Hon. Schuyler Co. fax, ex-vice 
president of the United States, and whose 
death occurred at Mankato, Minn.. January 13, 
1885. He was a native of New York and was 
born March 23, 1823. He came west in 1836 
and located in New Carlisle and later was 
deputy auditor of St. Joseph County. He early 
developed a taste for politics and newspaper 
work and in 1845 he founded the St. Joseph 
Valley Register. He filled various positions 
of political nature, and was a delegate to the 
Whig convention that nominated Gen. Scott fo .• 




HON. SCHUYLOR COLFAX, SR. 

the presidency. In 1855 he was elected to con- 
gress from this district, and was re-elected six 
consecutive terms. He was speaker of the 
House from 1863 to 1869. He was nominated 



as vice-president in 1866, and served in that 
distinguished office four years. He retired 
from pubic life in 1872 and returned to South 
Bend. He was a man of lare gifts as an orator 
and statesman, and was ever held in high 
esteem by all who knew him. He was married 
in 1S68 to Miss Ellen Wade, a niece of Senator 
Wade of Ohio, who survives him, and his 
son, Schuyler Colfax is now the Mayor of South 
Bend. 



ANDREW KUNTSMAN. 
One of the oldest and most high'y esteemed 
of the German pioneer residents of South Bend 
was Mr. Andrew Kuntsman. whose death oc- 
curred at his home in this city on October 19, 




ANDREW HUNTSMAN. 

1897. Mr. Kuntsman had been in failing 
health for a number of years and was en- 
deared to a iarge circle of friends in this city. 
Mr. Kuntsman was a native of Germany, and 
was bo:n near Arzberg, Bavaria, on March 22, 
ls38. In 1847 his parents came to America, 
and located in St. Joseph County, Indiana. 
Here Mr. Kuntsman was reared and learned 
the trade of a cooper, in which business he was 
engaged for a number of years, first locating 
at a point just south of the city, later at Mish- 
awaka, and then at South Bend where he re- 
sided until his death. He was always a most 
active business man, and was prominent in the 
social and fraternal circles of the city. He 
was warmly esteemed in the community and 



SOUTH BEND 



247 



won hosts of friends. On December 6, I860, 
Mr. Kuntsman was married to Miss Barbara 
Bauer, who was also a native of Arzberg. 
Bavaria, and who came to South Bend in 184S. 
This most excellent lady survived her husband, 
but death came to her on February 12, 1900. 
after leading the life of an invalid for more 
than eight years. She was a most estimable 
and warm hearted lady and was widely es- 
teemed. They left two children, a son and 
daughter, Mr. Andrew Kuntsman, Jr., and Mrs. 
E. H. Frederickson, both of this city. Mr. 
Kuntsman was a prominent member of Ger- 
mania Lodge, 301, F. & A. M., and Robert Blum 
Lodge, 278, I. O. O. F., and these fraternities 
performed the funeral ceremonies. He was 
also the o dest member of the South Bend 
Turn Verein, and took an active interest in 
that organization. 



HON. BENJAMIN F. SHIVELY. 

Hon. Benjamin F. Shively is a native of St. 

Joseph County and was born March 20, 1857. 

His father. Rev. Joel Shively, and his mother 

Elizabeth (Penrod) Shively, were natives of 




HON. liENJAMUN K. SHIVELY. 

Pennsylvania, but came West and located in 
this county in 1854. Mr. Shively spent his 
early years upon the farm and attended the 
district schools during the winter. Afterward 
he attended the Northern Indiana Normal 
school at Valparaiso, and was engaged in 
teaching from 1875 to 1880 when he came to 



South Bend and engaged in journalism. In 
1884 he was elected as representative to Con- 
gress for the 13th district. His term expired 
in 1885 and he then enteied the Law depart- 
ment of the University of Michigan, gradua- 
ting in the class of 1SS6. He was again 
nominated for congress and elected, and re- 
elected in 1888 and 1890. While in congress 
he earned high honor and was a prominent 
member of that body. He served on the com- 
mittees on Banking and Currency, Indian 
Affairs, District of Columbia and ways and 
means, where he rendered conspicuous service. 
On finishing his last term he declined further 
honors and returned home to devote himself to 
the practice of the law and the care of certain 
industrial interests which demanded his at- 
tention, in 1896 air. Shively accepted the 
Democratic nomination for governor of the 
state, and a though defeated he received over 
30,000 more votes than had ever been cast in 
the state for Governor. At the last national 
convention his name was piominently men- 
tioned for the office of vice president but he 
absolutely declined the preferred honor. Mr. 
Shively is a lawyer of ability and successful 
practice, and as an orator has few equals either 
in the courts or on the rostrum. As a cam- 
paign speaker he is forceful, logical and mag- 
netic and his valuable services to his party a:e 
known and appreciated by the party leaders in 
every section of the country. In 1889 he was 
married to Miss Laura Jenks, the accom- 
plished daughter of Hon. George A. Jenks, of 
Brookville, Pa., solicitor general of the United 
States from 1886 to 1889, and his family con- 
sists of two sons and a daughter. Mr. Shively 
is a scholar and a close student of classical and 
current literature and for the past seven years 
has been trustee of the Indiana University. He 
owns an extensive library and his commodious 
home is located at No. 402 North Michigan 
street. 



ALBERT LISTENBERGER. 

Mr. Albert Listenberger is one of the best 
known men in South Bend and from his in- 
fancy has been identified with the giowth and 
progress of the city. He was born here on 
May 3, 1843, and is a son of John Listenberger, 
who was the first merchant tailor in this city, 
and at one time a partner of John W. Chess, 
and his mother was Lodema (Fowler) Listen- 
bfrger. The young man attended private 
school at the Old Seminary, and in 1852 ac- 
companied his father to Ca.iforria with a herd 
of cattle, which were driven overland to the 
Pacific coast. On this journey his father was 



■us 



SOUTH BEND. 



wounded in the breast by an arrow during an 
engagement with hostile Indians, and fiom 
which he never fully recovered. They re- 

turned in 1S54 and the young man attended 
school until 1857 when he learned the tinners' 



■I 



Oliver Plow Works for twenty years in the 
United States and foreign countries. Since 
then he has not been in active business except 
in acting as receiver for the Indiana Paper 
Company. He was one of the organizers and 
first president of the Citizens' National Bank 
and for three yeais was a member of the Board 
of Education. He was interested in the erec- 
tion of the Lafayette and Elder schools and 
the splendid Public Library building. Mr. 
Listenberger was married in August, I860, to 
Miss Ella Finney of Valparaiso and his family 
consists of three daughters, Mrs. Charles 
Coonley, Mis. W. D. O'Brien and Miss Anna 
Listenberger who resides at home. He is a 
member of the Indiana and Commercial-Ath- 
letic clubs and of Norman Eddy Post, G. A. R. 
He resides at No. 744 West Washington street. 




MINER E. LISTENBERGER. 

Mr. Miner E. Listenberger has been prom- 
inently connected with the real estate business 
in this city since 1872. He is a native of 
South Bend and was born May 3, 1S48, and in 
1S52 his father, John Listenberger, removed 



ALBERT LloTEaRERGER. 

trade with Massey Bros, and finished it at Val- 
paraiso. Early in 1860 he went to Pike's Peak 
and worked at his trade in Denver and other 
cities until he was seized with mountain 
fever. On his recovery he rode the "Pony 
Express" on the plains in Colorado covering 
a distance of about eighty miles per day, until 
the civil war occurred when he enlisted in 
August, 1861, in the Second Iowa Cavalry ser- 
ving three and a half years. He was promoted 
to Sergeant and on July 1, 1862, was taken 
prisoner at Booneville, Miss., in a charge and 
after several lemovals was taken to Libby 
Prison where he was paroled and afterwaid 
exchanged and returned to his old regiment. 
He was mustered out in October, 1864, and re- 
turning home engaged in the dry goods busi- 
ness in 1S65 with Albert Davis at Bourbon, 
Marshall County. He remained there nearly 
four years, and then purchased an interest in 
the Valparaiso Woolen Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and was its secretary until he returned 
to South Bend in 1871 and engaged in the 
grocery business with his bi other, but gave it 
up on account of ill health. He sought active 
exercise for a year and then traveled for the 




MINER E. LISTENBERGER. 

with his family, overland to California where 
he remained several years. During his jour- 
ney to the west the elder Mr. Listenberger 
was shot by the Pawnee Indians in the B ack 
Hills, and seriously wounded. Mr. Listenber- 
ger was educated in the public schools of 
South Bend and later at the University of 



SOUTH BEND. 



219 



Notre Dame. In 1872 he engaged in the real 
estate, insurance and loan business, and has 
been successfully engaged in that line since. 
He was the owner of M. E. Listenberger's first 
and second additions to South Bend, and has 
been prominently connected with many of the 
most important real estate transactions in 
this city and vicinity for the past twenty-five 
years. He is also the agent for the Royal 
Insurance Co., of Liverpool; the Niagara, of 
New York; the Fire Association, of Philadel- 
phia; the Northern, of England; the Phoenix, 
of London; the British-American, and the 
Traveler's Life and Accident, of Hartford, 
Conn. He is well known in the community and 
universally esteemed as a business man of high 
standing and progressive methods. He was 
married to Miss Anna M. Hull, of Lafayette, 
Indiana ,and resides at No. 603 West Washing- 
ton street. 



DAVID STOVER. 

After more than four score years of active 
and honorable life Mr. David Stover is now 
enjoying the comforts of life, and is still in 



:\ 




boy took charge of the farm and went to the 
district schools until he was nineteen, when he 
came west in 1S35 and located in South Bend. 
He first engaged with his bi other, Mathias 
Stover, in the cabinet, furniture and undertak- 
ing business for about ten years, when he pur- 
chased his brother's interest and conducted the 
business until 1852 when he sold out. He was 
appointed a mail agent by President Pierce 
on the route from Toledo to Chicago and con- 
tinued in that vocation under President Bu- 
chanan. On the election of President Lincoln 
he was retired from office when he returned 
home. He then engaged in the marble business 
with David C. Myers, at No. 123 South Michi- 
gan street, and they were together for five 
years when Mr. Stover purchased the business 
and continued it three years and sold it to his 
o.d paitner Mr. Myers. He then went to 
Virginia and returned in about six months 
when he erected the brick building at No. 123 
South Michigan street which was first occu- 
pied by D. W. Russ. He also erected the 
brick building at No. 129 South Michigan 
street. He then purchased the business of 
Boyn, Garrett & Welton, marble cutters, on 
Michigan street, south of Wayne street, im- 
proved the property and finally sold out to 
Johnson & May. He then engaged in the tea 
business at No. 129 South Michigan street 
which he successfully conducted until May, 
1S97, when he sold out and retired from active 
business. Mr. Stover was always an active 
business man and public spirited citizen. He 
was a trustee of the Old Seminary and was a 
member of the first city council from the sec- 
ond ward, serving several terms. He was a 
strong temperance advocate and was defeated 
for the legislature in 1852 on account of his 
temperance principles. Mr. Stover was mar- 
ried in 1855 to Miss Calista Hunt of Toledo, 
Ohio, and with his wife resides in a handsome 
home on Vistula avenue, near Springbrook 
Park. He joined the Methodist church in 
1838 and is the oldest member of the First M. 
E. church of this city. He was also an active 
member of the Odd Fellows and the Sons of 
Temperance. 



DAVID STOVER. 

vigorous health. He is a native of Virginia, 
and was born in Bortetort County on January 
19, 1816. His father was John Stover, a suc- 
cessful farmer, and his mother was Catherine 
(Snyder) Stover. His father died when young 
Stover was but eleven years of age and the 



SAMUEL LEEPER. 

Among the first appointments made by 
Mayor Co'fax under the provisions of the new 
city charter, was that of Mr. Samuel Leeper as 
a member of the board of commissioners com- 
posing the newly created Department of Public 
Works. This appointment was received with 
general tavor by the community, and Mr. 
Leeper's fitness for the position is generally 



250 



SOUTH BEND. 



acknowledged. He is an energetic and repre- 
sentative business man who has won the 
esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens, 
and the wisdom of the Mayor's choice in this 
instance is universaly conceded. Mr. Leeper. 
although a native of Ohio, has resided in St. 
Joseph County since he was one year of age. 
He was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, De- 
cember 10, 1862, and is the son of Samuel 
Leeper and Susan (Metzger) Leeper. His 
parents were among the early pioneers in this 




SAMUEL LEBJMK. 

section of the country and were well and 
prominently known in this vicinity. Young 
Samuel received his education in the public- 
schools of this city, his father's farm prac- 
tically adjoining the town, and until 1888 he 
assisted his father on the farm. During that 
year, however, he determined to engage in 
business for himself, and formed a partnership 
with Mr. James B. Reed, and began the manu- 
facture of brick, under the firm name of Leeper 
& Reed. This arrangement continued until 
1892 when Mr. Reed retired and Mr. William 
H. Longley became a partner in the business 
under the title of Leeper & Longley, and this 
firm is now one of the largest brick manufac- 
turing concerns in this section of Indiana. Mr. 
Leeper is a business man of most excellent 
judgment and ability, and though modest and 
retiring in his disposition is strong and forceful 
as an executive manager. He is a man ot 
progressive ideas and has won his present high 



standing in business circies and in the com- 
munity by his own merits. Mr. Leeper takes 
an active part in political affairs and is a lead- 
ing member in the Republican party in North- 
ern Indiana. A.though disinclined to accept 
a public office he was appointed by Governor 
Durbin as a member of the Police Commission 
of this city, and most ably fulfilled the duties 
of that position during his short term of office. 
He is a stockholder in the South Bend National 
Bank, and was recently elected a trustee of 
that institution to fill the vacancy occasioned 
by the death of his brother, David K. Leeper, 
and at one time was the president of tne Brick 
Exchange. Mr. Leeper was married on Jan 
nary 9, 1SSS, to Miss Delia M. Earl, of Michi- 
gan, and a daughter of David Earl, and his 
family consists of three children, Lena, Leota, 
born October 6, 1889, and Kittie, bom Novem- 
ber 11, 1891, and Mary Elsie, Dorn December 8, 
1898. His comfortable home is located on 
the banks of the river near the Michigan street 
bridge, which is popularly known as Leeper's 
bridge. Mr. Leeper is fraternally connected 
with the Knights of Pythias and is a leading 
member of the local lodge of Elks. 



MYRON CAMPBELL. 

Mr. Myron Campbell, the able cashier of the 
South Bend National Bank, and who has been 
connected with that honored financial institu- 
tion since 1878, is a native of Indiana. He was 
born at Valparaiso, Porter County, March 13, 
1849, and is the son of Samuel A. Campbell and 
Harriet (Cornell) Campbell, and a twin brother 
of Hon. Marvin Campbell of this city. His 
father is still living and resides on the same 
fai m on which young Campbell was born. Mr. 
Campbell's early education was acquired in the 
public schools in that vicinity and afterward he 
attended the college at Valparaiso. He then 
took up civil engineering and surveying and 
was connected with the construction of the 
Chicago & Grand Trunk railroad on the section 
between Flint and Lansing, Mich. He was al- 
so county surveyor of Porter County for four 
years. From 1872 to 1874 he was engaged in 
the grocery business in this city with Mr. Hor- 
ace G. Miller, now postmaster of the city, under 
the fiim name of Miller & Campbell. In 1878 
he returned to South Bend and entered the ser- 
vice of the South Bend National Bank as book- 
keeper. He afterward acted as vice-president 
and on Maich 14, 1891, was elected cashier of 
that instituton and has retained this honorable 
position up to the present time. Mr. Campbell 
is a conservative banker of progressive ideas 
and has proven a most valuable official. Though 



SOUTH BEND 



251 



of a modest ternpeiament he has been a firm 
and consistent exponent of the higher laws of 
banking and business, and has won the con- 
fidence and esteem of his banking associates 
and the community. He was awarded the priz? 
by Rand & McNally's Banker's Magazine for a 
paper on "Country Banking" and was similarily 
honored by Rhodes Journal of banking for a 
paper on "Domestic Exchange." Mr. Campbell 
professional way, and his sei vices are in fre- 
quent demand in important cases in court. He 
has never desired to hold public office, but from 
1895 to 1898 he served on the city Board of 
Education, and gave his best efforts to the 
cause of education. Mr. Campbell was married 
to Miss Abbie Fifield, of Valparaiso, and his 
family consists of two sons and two daughters. 
Edward H. Campbell is a graduate of the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, and a lieutenant in the 
United States Navy; Robert S. Campbell, is an 
electrician and connected with the local tele- 
phone company; Ada C. Campbell is a graduate 
of De Pauw University, and a teacher in the 
scientific department of the South Bend High 
School, and Vera, the youngest daughter is a 
pupil in the High School. Mr. Campbell is 
is also the author and publisher of a valuable 



treasurer of the First M. E. Church, and of the 
Young Men's Christian Association and is ac- 
tive in each. He resides with his family at No. 
323 West Navarre street. 




MYUOX CAMPBELL. 

book of interest tables and exchange tables, 
that have met with the cordial endorsement of 
bankers and business men. Mr. Campbell is 
a recognized expert on hand writing, in a non- 



DR. CHARLES M. BUTTERWORTH. 
The appointment by Mayor Colfax of Dr. 
Charles M. Butterworth as City Health Officer, 
under the provisions of the new charter, has 




DU. CHAS, M. BUTTEKWOKTH. 

been received with general satistaction by the 
community. Dr. Butterworth occupies a 

piominent position as a medical practitioner 
in this city, and is recogmzeu as a gentleman 
of rare executive ability and tnoroughness. He 
was born in Mishawaka Juiy 8, iStiti. His 
father, Dr. Wi.liam W. Butterworth, was ior 
years a well known physician in that locality 
and the son naturally turned his attention to 
the study of medicine. After passing through 
the various public schools he attended the 
Medical College of Ohio, at Cincinnati, and 
giaduated in the spring of 1889. He came to 
this city immediately after his graduation and 
commenced the practice of medicine ana 
surgery in which he has been successful. For 
three years he was County Physician and had 
charge of the County Asylum, St. Joseph Asy- 
lum and Portage Township. He is a member 
of the medical staff of the Epworth Hospital 
and was a lecturer on the "Practice of Medi- 
cine" at the Training School for Nurses at- 
tached to that institution. He is also a mem- 



252 



SOUTH BEND 



ber of the American Medical Association and 
St. Joseph County Medical Society, and was 
elected president of the latter organization. Dr. 
Butterwoith was married to Miss Ellen F. 
Slattery of Syracuse, New York, who was the 
superintendent of music in the schoo.s of 
South Bend, and nas an interesting family. His 
office and residence is at No. 227 South Main 
street. 



DANIEL GREENE. 

Mr. Daniel Greene is one of the oldest and 
most honored citizens of St. Joseph County. 
and for more than a third of a century has 
been identified with the progressive history of 
South Bend. Mr. Gieene comes of Colonial 




D.'.SIEL GREENE. 

ancestry, his great grandfather having come 
from England before the Revolution. His 

father, John Greene, was a native of Delaware, 
as was his mother, Nancy Ann Jackson, and 
this worthy couple, with three children, Israel, 
John and Ezekiel came fiom Deleware to Ohio 
with a one horse wagon in 1810. and settler! 
on a farm at Xenia. Greene County, Ohio. To 
this worthy couple were born twelve children, 
all of whom figured in the early pioneer history 
of the then Northwest. Mr. Daniel Greene 
was born in a log house on the old farni in 



Greene County. Ohio, December 15, 1818. the 
closing of a momentous period in history. He 
has lived through the greater part of the 
nineteenth century and has witnessed and as- 
sisted in its growth, prosperity and inventive 
advancement, and has seen South Bend ad- 
vance from a frontier trading post of a few 
whites and many Indians to the fourth city of 
Indiana. Mr. Greene secured his education 
in a log school house and assisted his father 
on the farm. In 1832 his parents removed to 
Sumption Prairie, where he lived until I860, 
and where his parents, two brothers and one 
sister died. They located on a large farm 
and Greene township is named after the family. 
In 1866 Mr. Ezekiel Greene was elected County 
Treasurer of St. Joseph County, and appointed 
his brother .Daniel, as deputy. Mr. Greene 
removed to South Bend and has since resided 
here. He seived two years as Deputy County 
Treasurer, and then engaged in the real estate 
business. Later he embarked in the grocery 
busiuess, and still later in the agricultural im- 
plement business. In 1880 he became a stock 
holder in the South Bend Chilled Plow Com- 
pany, and was treasurer of the company six 
years, when he retired from active business. 
Mr. Greene through life has been a man of 
energy and progress and has always acted 
from firm principle in all his dealings. He 
has ever been a strong and consistent factor 
in honest politics, and though often importuned 
to accept positions of honor from his party, 
steadfastly refused, and worked hard and hon- 
orably in the great army of Republicans. He 
cast his first presidential vote for Martin Van 
Buren in 1840, and since that date has never 
missed voting at a general election in this 
county. Orignially he belonged to the Free 
Soil party, and he was one or the organizers 
of the Republican party in St. Joseph county, 
and one of its most forceful and honored mem- 
bers. Twice he has been elected chairman of 
the County Republican Central Committee and 
each time declined the honor. To every hon- 
orable principle in national and local Republi- 
can politics he has remained faithful during 
his long and eventful life. In 1S41 he became 
a member of the Presbyterian church, and is 
an elder of the church and has conscientiously 
lived the life he has taught. In 1849 Mr. 
Greene was married to Miss Mary Leeper, and 
his home at No. 403 South Lafayette street is 
an ideal abode for himself and estimable wife. 
Mr. Greene's family consists of three children, 
Mrs. E. J. Kettring, widow of the late Dr. 
Joshua A. Kettring. Horace L. Greene, of the 
South Bend Foundry Company, and Miss M. 
Edna Greene. 



SOUTH BEND, 



253 



DR. JOHN C. SACK. 
In the death of Dr. John C. Sack, which oc- 
curred in this city on April 12, 1889, there 
passed away one of the most able physicians 
and a courteous and accomplished man in the 
highest sense. Dr. Sack was born at Arzberg, 
Bavaria, December 28, 1820. His family was 




most estimable lady still survives him, sur- 
rounded by the love of her children and friends 
and in the enjoyment of excellent hea.th. Five 
children were born to them two of whom are 
deceased. Three daughters are now living 
in this city, Anna, wife of Fred W. Mueller, 
Rosa, who is a music teacher of prominence, 
and Thekla, who is the teacher of German in 
the High School. The family home is at No. 
133 Vistula avenue. The funeral of Dr. Sack 
was largely attended. Mr. George F. Geyer 
of this city spoke in German, and Hon. A. L. 
Brick delivered a touching eulogy. The 

ceremonies were conducted by Robert Blum 
Lodge, 278, I. O. O. F., and the Turn Verein, 
both of which he was an honored member. 
The pall bearers were Frank Ambos, John 
Wagener, "Ulrich Foegley. Erhardt Elbe], John 
N. Elbel and Charles Vinson. After a life 
of usefulness and honor he passed to his 
eternal rest. 



DAVID B. BOWMAN. 

One of the earliest and most esteemed resi- 
dents of St. Joseph County passed away in the 
death of Mr. David Bowman, which occurred 
at his home on South Michigan street on 



DR. JOHN 0. SACK. 

among the most prominent in his native town 
and the son received the advantages of a most 
liberal education. He was at first a student 
of theology and giaduated from the college at 
Erlangen, Germany. Soon afterward he was 
ordained to the ministry in the Lutheran 
church. Preferring the practice of medicine 
he attended the medical college at Wuerzburg 
and graduated in 1855. On July 3, 1855, he 
came to South Bend, where many of his fel- 
low townsmen had preceded him. From the 
outset Dr. Sack was a leading spirit among 
the German residents of this city. He was 
highly educated and was a great reader and 
close student. As a linguist he had no 
superior and he was also an artist of decided 
talent and ability, and an excellent physician 
and surgeon. He was an advocate of physical 
as well as intellectual development and was 
an expert swordsman and delighted in athletic 
exercises. He was remarkably successful in 
his piofession but during the later years of 
hs life gave up the more rigorous and active 
work. On November 10, 1856, he was married 
to Miss Margaret Katherine Koenig, and this 




DAVID B. BOWMAN. 

Thursday afternoon, February 23, 1S93, after 
an illness of but three day's duration. Mr. 
Bowman was born at Dayton, Ohio, November 
9, 1825. His father was Elder Jacob Bowman, 



25 1 



SOUTH BEND 



a preacher in the Dunker church, and a man 
widely known. When Mr. Bowman was but 
six years of age his parents left Ohio and 
traveled by team to Indiana and settled in 1831 
just south of this city. Mr. Bowman was 
reared on the farm and was an ardent and pro- 
gressive agriculturist, and a man of the highest 
honor and integrity. He was of a genial and 
sunny disposition and generous and public 
spirited. He was twice married. On Octo- 
ber 9, 1849, he married Miss Elizabeth Stull. 
who died January 27. 1875. One child was 
born to the union, a daughter, the wife of Mr. 
Edward F. Dubail, of this city. On September 
9, 1876, he married Miss Luzetta Fox, of Leb- 
anon, Pa., a most estimable lady, who survives 
him. To them one child was born, Mr. John 
A. Bowman. Mrs. Bowman resides at No. 
1863 South Michigan street. Mr. Bowman's 
funeral was largely attended by friends and 
relatives, and was conducted at the family resi- 
dence, the interment being at Bowman's Cem- 
etery. The Rev. N. D. Williamson officiated 
assisted by Dr. Henry Webb Johnson. The 
pall bearers were: Hon. David R. Leeper. John 
W. Zigler. George W. Locke. William Rupel, 
Joseph G. Zigler anu Elisha Rupel. 



CHARLES G. HODSON. 
Among the old and well known business 
men of this city, who for nearly half a century 
have been identified with its growth and 
progress, is Mr. Charles G. Hodson, who lo- 
cated in South Bend in the summer of 1855. 
Mr. Hodson was born in Burlington County. 
New Jersey, March 25, 1830. near the village of 
Crooked Billet, and is a son of George Hodson 
who was well known as afarmer in that local- 
ity, and Harriet (Gaskell) Hodson. and is a 
brother of George T. Hodson of this city. Mr. 
Hodson attended school at Mansfield New 
Jersey, and afterward learned the trade of a 
carpenter at Burlington. New Jersey. In 

1851 he engaged in the carpenter ana building 
business in Burlington and remained there 
until June 1855 when he came to South Bend. 
He engaged in the same business here in 1862 
and erected buildings on Michigan street. 
Washington street and Coonley's corner, the 
Baker building, the Lincoln block, the Grand 
Central Hotel, and a number of other build- 
ings. Mr. Hodson was engaged in the re- 
moval of the old St. Mary's buildings from 
Bertrand, Michigan, and Mishawaka to St. 
Mary's, which he successfully accomplished. In 
1867 he was associated with the late Judge 
Stanfield. E. P. and Howard S. Stanfield and 
Henry Barth in the Eagle Manufacturing Com- 
pany, in the sash, door and blind business, 



which continued until 1876. Then with his 
brother he conducted the mill, which was lo- 
cated on the West Race at Washington street, 
until 1885 when the property was totally 
destroyed by fire, at a loss of $30,000. After- 
ward he was associated with E. P. Stanfield 
as Hodson & Stanfield and the business was 
continued until 1898 when it was closed and 
afterward became C. G. Hodson & Son. Mr. 
Hodson has not been engaged in active busi- 




c HARI.ES G. HUDSON 

ness since that time. He was married June 
27. 1852. to Miss Rebecca F. Lippincott, or 
Burlington, New Jersey, and eleven children 
have been born to them, three of whom are de- 
ceased. Those living are Mrs. Harriet Beyers. 
Charles L. Hodson, Mrs. Lottie L. Harris, 
George F. Hodson, Mrs. Flora S. Sharkey, Mrs. 
Alice M. Steed of this city, and William K. 
Hodson of Chicago. Mr. Hodson erected his 
comfortable homestead at No. 708 South Michi- 
gan street about forty years ago, and with his 
most estimable wife and family has since re- 
sided there. 



GODFREY E. MEYER. 
Mr. Godfrey E. Meyer, whose death oc- 
curred in this city on January 4. 1901. was one 
of the oldest and most highly esteemed busi- 
ness men and citizens of South Bend. He 
was a native of Bavaria. Germany, and whs 
born October 9, 1823. He was the son of John 
V. Meyer, a farmer in that section of Germany, 



SOUTH BEND 



255 



and there the young man leceived his early 
education. He learned the manufacture of 
brittania ware, and until he was twenty-eight 
years old he was engaged in that vocation. In 
1853 he came to the United States, and located 
in South Bend where a number of his fellow 




and was one of the charter members of the 
local Turn-Verien. In 1853 he was married 
to Miss Bernardina Buhman, who was also a 
native of Germany, now deceased, and he 
leaves surviving him one son, John V. Meyer, 
and three daughters, Emma, who is the wife of 
Thomas B. Roberts, a newspaper publisher at 
Armour, South Dakota; Anna, who is the wife 
of the Hon. Aoraham L. Brick, of this city, and 
Mary, who is married to Gustav H. Wenger, 
also of this city. Mr. Meyer was a public 
spirited citizen and his death was mourned by 
a large circle of warm friends. 



EDWARD P. STANFIELD. 

One of the first appointments made by Mayor 
Colfax under the new city charter, and one 
which has given universal satisfaction, is that 
of Mr. Edward P. Stanfield. as comptroller of 
the city. Mr. Stanfield's fitness for the office 
is acknowledged by all. He has for more 
than a quarter of a century been identified 
with the commercial life of this city, and has 
been extensively engaged in the lumber and 
manufacturing business. He was born in this 
city December 25, 1842, and is a son of the 
late Judge Thomas S. Stanfield and Nancy 
(Peebles) Stanfield. Mr. Stanfield attended 



GODFKEY E. MEYEB. 

countrymen had preceded him. On first com- 
ing here he entered the employ of Massey 
Bros., tinsmiths and hardware merchants, an r l 
with them he learned the tinning trade and b^ 
came a most expert workman. He continui 
in this business several years when he form<_ 
a partnership with Mr. Gottfried Poehlman. 
which continued until 1893. when Mr. Poehl- 
man retired from the firm, and disposed of his 
interest in the business to Mr. John Meyer, a 
son of Mr. Meyer, who has been identifiea with 
it ever since. Mr. Meyer was an acknowledged 
expert in his profession, and during his busi- 
ness career he did the roofing and cornice 
work for most of the prominent buildings, 
churches, and residences in South Bend. The 
Auditorium, the Oliver Opera House, the Elk- 
hart Opera House, and a number of handsome 
public buildings bear evidence of his skill and 
handiwork. He was remarKably successful, 
and although he had attained the venerable 
age of seventy-seven years, up to within a few 
days of his death he was strong and vigorous 
and was in daily attendance at his extensive 
place of business No. 117 North Michigan 
street. He was well known in the community, 




EDWAKD P. STANFrELD. 



school in this city and Princeton College. He 
left college and enlisted in the 4Sth Indiana 
Volunteers, November 18, 1861. He served as 
first lieutenant and adjutant or the regiment 



256 



SOUTH BEND. 



which was commanded by Colonel Non-man 
Eddy, and was mustered out December 24, 
1864. On his return home he attended the 
University of Micnigan, was admitted to the 
bar and practiced two years. He was after- 
ward connected with the Eagle Manufactuiing 
Company in the planing mill, sash, door and 
blind and lumber business, and has been in 
that line of business for thirty years. In 
1877 he was connected with the firm of G. T. 
Hodson & Co., which was afterward known 
as Hodson & Stanfleld. which dissolved in 
1S98 when Mr. Stanfleld retired to private life. 
Mr. Stanfleld is a member of the Commandery 
of Indiana. Loyal Legion, and is commander of 
Norman Eddy Post, G. A. R. He was married 
to Miss E'iza A. Harris of South Bend, and his 
family consists ot a son and two daughters, 
one of whom is the wife of Mr. Charles F. Post, 
who is with the South Bend Paper Company, 
and one daughter and son resides at home. 
The family residence is No. 124 South William 
street. 



JOHN M. BROWN. 
One of the prominent officia's of St. Joseph 
County is Mr. John M. Brown, the popular and 
efficient County Auditor. Mr. Brown was 




JOHN M. BKOWN. 

born in the City of Liverpool, England, July 17, 
1859. His father, David E. Brown, handled 
the real estate of the Coiporation of Liver- 
pool, and was a highly prominent official. 
Young Brown was educated in private schools 



in his native city, and at the Crosby Grammar 
School for Boys, and then engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits in Southern England. In 1877 
he came direct to South Bend, and engaged in 
farming, and for two years was employed on 
the Clem Studebaker farm. He next came to 
South Bend and was employed for a time by the 
Singer Mfg Company, and then engaged in 
farming for Thomas D. Summers. He returned 
to South Bend and entered the emp.oy of 
Hon. Marvin Campbell, as clerk in his hard- 
ware store, and later as bookkeeper, remaining 
with Mr. Campbell three years. He was 
tendered a clerkship by County Auditor Aaron 
Jones, and accepted it,- as Deputy County 
Auditor, remaining until 1891, when Mr. Jones' 
term expired. When Robert Myler was elected 
County Auditor Mr. Brown continued as Deputy 
one year, when he resigned to become Assist- 
ant Cashier of the South Bend National Bank, 
where he remained until 1897. He was made 
Deputy County Auditor by Mr. George W. 
Loughman, where he remained until 1899. In 
1898 Mr. Brown was elected County Auditor, 
his term expiring in 1903. He has given the 
county a thorough business administration and 
is highly popular. Mr. Brown was married in 
1883 to Miss Anna B. Herring, of this city, and 
with his estimable wife and three children: 
Mabel, John A. and Edgar G., resides at No. 
734 Park avenue. Mr. Brown is popular in 
social circles and is a director of, and at its 
organization was treasurer of the Commercial- 
Athletic Club. He is a member of the Indiana 
Club, the Royal Arcanum, and South Bend 
Lodge No. 294, F. & A. M. He is also Director 
of St. Joseph Loan & Trust Company, and in 
January, 1901, was elected Assistant Secretary 
of the St. Joseph County Savings Bank. 



JOHN PLATZ. 
For more than half a century Mr. John Platz 
has been identified with the material growth 
and progress of this city, and in his business 
as a contractor and builder has contributed to 
its substantial and architectural advancement. 
Mr. P atz was born near New Berlin, in Som- 
erset County, Penn., September 20, 1827. He 
is the son of Peter Platz. a well known con- 
tractor and builder, and Mary (Deeter) Platz, 
both of whom came to Sumption Prairie in 
1853, and died there several years ago. When 
Mr. Platz was but a year ola his parents came 
west and located at Canton, Ohio, where he 
was reared and received the benefits of a pub- 
lic school education, the father of Mrs. McKin- 
ley, the wife of President McKinley. being his 
school mate. He was licensed as a school 



SOUTH BEND. 



257 



teacher and taught for a short time, but learn- 
ing the business of a contractor and builder 
with his father, was associated with him for a 
short time and then commenced business for 
himself. On May 15, 1851, ne came to South 
Bend, and for two years after settling here, he 




but four of whom are living, Charles A., James 
A., anu John Harry, and a daughter, Cora, who 
is now the accomplished wife of Mr. L. Clar- 
ence Ball, the well known artist of this city. 
Mr. Platz has won the esteem of the entire 
community and since his marriage has been 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and for many years was a member of the first 
church of this city, but latterly has been con- 
nected with Grace Church. He is also a mem- 
ber of South Bend Lodge and Encampment, J. 
0. O. P., and has received past official degrees 
in both organizations. Mr. Platz, despite his 
more than three score and ten years of active 
and useful life is still in the enjoyment of vig- 
orous health, and resides with his daughter 
and son in law at No. 142 East Elder street. 



RALPH STAPLES, SR. 
Mr. Ralph Staples, Sr., whose death occurred 
at Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1864, by 
a fall from a scaffold, was one of those early 
and energetic pioneers of South Bend. He 
was born at Prospect Corners, Waldo County, 
Maine, in 1812. Here he resided and labored 



JOHN PLATZ. 

taught in the district schools. His parents 
followed nini in 1853 and located at Sumption 
Prairie. He gave up teaching and engaged in 
the contracting and building business in which 
he continued for a number of years. He 
erected the two paper mills in this city and 
several of the buildings connected with the 
Singer and Studebaker works. He was fore- 
man at Singer's for about five years ana held 
the same position in the building department 
at Studebaker s for the same length oi time. 
He was a member of the Volunteer lire depart- 
ment in the early days, and was foreman ot 
the old "Bucket Brigade ' prior to 1853. When 
the companies were formed and hand engines 
came in vogue, Mr. Platz was always active 
in the service. He was appointed City Com- 
missioner which office he held until the adop- 
tion of the new charter which practically leg- 
islated him out of office, and was a most able 
official. He was the first truant officer ap- 
pointed under the law, and still nolds that im- 
portant position. He was married in 1847 to 
Miss Matilda Palmer, a resident of Starke 
County, Ohio, and this most estimable lady died 
in April 1899. Nine children were born to them 




RALPH STAPLES, SR. 

until 1834 when on June 18, he was married to 
Miss Hannah Cromwell, a native of Hancock 
County, Maine, and of staunch Revolutionary 
ancestry, who still survives him. Shortly 
after his marriage Mr. Staples and his young 
wife started from their home in Maineto seek 
their fortune in the West. After many severe 



25S 



SOUTH BEND. 



trials and hardships during their overland 
journey in those early pioneer days, they lo- 
cated temporarily in Licking County. Ohio, but 
not being satisfied with their surroundings and 
prospects they started with a team of oxen. 
and arrived in South Bend in November, 1836. 
On arriving here Mr. Stap'.es had but ten cents 
and a halt interest in the ox team. The 
family then consisted of father and mother and 
one son named Lemuel. Mr. Staples was a 
millwright and carpenter by trade and the son 
found lucrative employment although their 
first place of abode was an old log school 
house located a short distance from the river. 
Mr. Staples constructed the first bridge across 
the river at the foot of Water street, and was 
engaged in the erection of many other struct- 
ures. He filled several offices of trust and re- 
sponsibility. He served one term as Sheriff 
of the County, and was postmaster during a 
portion of the administrations of Presidents 
Pierce and Buchanan, and was placed in 
charge of the first St. Joseph County Poor 
House. In 1859 during the gold excitement at 
Pike's Peak, he went to Colorado and spent 
some time there. He returned to South Bend 
for a short time but again went back to the 
Rocky Mountain region where he met his death. 
He left a wife and eight children to survive 
him though eleven children were born to them. 
Those now living are: Lemuel, Alexander. 
Abraham, Charles, Israel and Ralph, who are 
all residents of this city, and Henry who re- 
sides with his mother and sister in Minne- 
apolis, Minn. Mrs. Staples is now in her 
eighty-sixth year, and is in the enjoyment of 
excellent health and retains all her facul- 
ties apparently unimpaired. She still recalls 
vividly many of her interesting experiences in 
the early days of this city when the village 
was but a wilderness and the Indians roamed 
the forests and plied their canoes down the 
rapid current of the picturesque "St. Joe" river. 



D. C. April 11, 1S70, while his father was vice 
president, and in 1875 he came to South Bend 
where he has since resided. He received his 
early education in the public schools of that 
city, and at Lawrenceville, N. J., and afterward 
took a course of study in the classical school at 
Indianapolis. In 1S89 the Colfax Manufactur- 
ing Company was organized, and Mr. Colfax is 
the sole owner of this industrial establish- 
ment. He has aiways taken a deep interest 
in political affairs, and in 189(5 he organized, 
and was president, of the famous Colfax March- 
ing Club, of this city, which was composed 
of nearly 2,000 workingmen. In 1898 he was 
elected Mayor of South Bend, and is the 



HON. SCHUYLER COLFAX. 

The Hon. Schuyler Colfax, the present Mayor 
of the city of South Bend, is a young, enter- 
prising progressive business man. He is the 
son of the late Hon. Schuyler Colfax, whose 
memory is endeared to the country as vice 
president of the United States, during the first 
administration of Gen. U. S. Grant, and who 
w as one of South Bend's most honored citizens. 
His mother is Ellen Wade Colfax, and she is 
a niece of the late Senator Ben Wade of Ohio. 
Mr. Colfax was born in the city of Washington, 





HON. SCHUYLER COLFAX. 

present able executive head of the municipality. 
He has done much to advance the city's best 
interests, and has instigated a number of re- 
forms in the city administration. By his con- 
sistent and conscientious action he has won 
the confidence and esteem of the community at 
large and he has always sought to exercise a 
proper economy in the various departments ot 
the municipal government. He is genial and 
courteous and has won many warm personal 
friends. Mr. Colfax was married in June. 1S95, 
to Miss Catherine Nelson, of Stillwater, Minn., 
a daughter of John G. Nelson, Surveyor Gen- 
eral of the St. Croix district, and with his 
wife and honored mother resides at No. 603 
West Colfax avenue. 



SOUTH BEND 



259 



RICKETSON BURROUGHS. 

For nearly half a centui y the name of Ricket- 
son Burroughs was prominently known in this 
community, and his death, which occurred at 
his home in this city on January 9, 1885, was 
the result of an attack of paralysis he re- 
ceived July 22, 1883, and from which he never 
fuliy recovered. Mr. Bui roughs was born in 
Dutchess County, N. Y.. January 19, 1812. His 
father was Dr. George Burroughs, a prominent 
physican in that section of the state. Mr. 
Burroughs learned the trade of a hatter in 
Tioy, N. Y., and with his mother and sister 
came to South Bend in 1837 and at once es- 
tablished a hat manufactory in the Rockstroh 
Block on West Washington street. Miss Julia 




ornamental article known as white brick. This 
enterprise marked a new era in the construc- 
tion of buildings in this city and he erected a 
number of brick edifices of a superior character. 
His corner store was the first to display an 
"open front," and he erected for Mr. Schuyler 
Colfax the first stone front building in this 
city. In his earlier days, as the first town- 
ship trustee, he built the first school house in 
the township. Mr. Burroughs became a mem- 
ber and a teacher in the Sunday school of the 
First Presbyterian Church shortly after his 
arrival in this city, and was a regular at- 
tendant as long as his health permitted and 
always took a deep interest in its growth. He 
organized the first Lyceum in this city, and was 
a leading member of "Moot Court," which 
was popular at one time. He was also in- 
terested in the State Bank of Indiana from its 
organization and was the president of the in- 
stitution for several years. His influence was 
felt in literary, religious and business affairs 
and he was a leader in them all. He was 
elected a member of the City Council for sev- 
eral terms. His services were frequently 
solicited as executor of estates and as guardian 
for minor children and all felt secure if their 
affairs were entrusted to his care. He left 
surviving him a sister, Miss Julia Burroughs, 
who is still a resident of this city and who 
lives in the old homestead at No. 501 Portage 
avenue. She is well known and most highly 
respected for her many admirable qualities. A 
brother, Reuben Burroughs, and a sister, Mrs. 
Alexander Cameron, are both deceased. He 
also left two sisters, Mrs. Folsom of Kansas 
and Mrs. Isaac Roraback of Davenport, Iowa. 



KK'KETSON BURROUGHS. 

Burroughs was the manager of his household 
and for years her loving affection and kindness 
ministered to his needs and comforts. He 
afterward purchased the property at the corner 
of Michigan and Washington streets, which 
he improved, and in which he conducted a 
large and successful business. Mr. George 
W. Matthews, was an apprentice of his in 1844, 
and in 1849 he was admitted to an interest in 
the business. This arrangement continued 
until 1852 when Mr. Burroughs disposed of his 
interest to Mr. Matthews and practically retired 
from mercantile life. He by no means, how- 
ever, relinquished active business pursuits, for 
shortly afterward he engaged in the manufac- 
ture of brick, and made a most durable and 



GEORGE N. WHITEMAN. 

Mr. George N. Whiteman, of the well known 
firm of Whiteman Bros., wholesale grocers and 
manufacturing confectioners, witn warehouse 
and factory at No. 324 South St. Joseph street, 
was born on a farm in Portage Township, St. 
Joseph County, December 15, 18&8. His father, 
Abram Whiteman, was a successful farmer, 
and his mother was Sarah tBeehler) vVhite- 
man. Young Whiteman was reared on the 
old homestead and was educated in the country 
schools. He left home after he had reached 
his majority, married and purchased a farm 
which he conducted successfully until 1889, 
when he came to South Bend and with his 
brother, William F. Whiteman, organized the 
firm of Whiteman Bros., and started in the 
wholesale grocery and confectionery business. 
A man of business methods and strict honesty 



200 



SOUTH BEND 



the business rapidly grew until three years ago 
the firm built its present two story and base- 
ment building, 33 x 165 feet in area, which is 
wholly utilized in the business. The firm 




His father was Abram Whiteman, who came 
from Pennsylvania, and was a successful 
farmer here, and his mother was Sarah (Beeh- 
ler) Whiteman. As a boy he was reared on 
the farm and was educated in the district 
schools. He lived on the farm until he was 
twenty-three years of age. when he went to 
Colorado, where he remained a year. Then 
he returned to South Bend and has since re- 
sided in this city, where he has built up an 
enterprise that fully attests his business 
genius. In 1889. with his brother, George N. 
Whiteman. he started business in a very 
small way, with a modest capital, and the 
growth of the business has been such that the 
firm can now invoice its stock at nearly $50,- 
000.00. The business grew rapidly and the 
firm moved to its present location, No. 324 
South St. Joseph street, and three years ago 
purchased additional property and erected a 
modern two story and basement warehouse 
and factory 33 x 165 feet, equipped with every 
facility for handling the constantly increasing 
business. The firm does a wholesale and 
jobbing grocery and confectionery business, 
and manufactures fine chocolates, bon bons 
and stick candies, and handles about 10.000 
tons of candy per year. The trade is within 



GEORGE X. WHITEMAN. 

does a general jobbing business in groceries 
and manufacture and supplies the trade with 
fine confectionery, chocolates, bon bons. stick 
candy, etc. Mr. Whiteman has been most 
successful in business. In 1S96 he traded 
some property on Prairie avenue for a strip of 
ground on Vistula avenue, the latter being a 
swamp and considered worthless. Mr. White- 
man filled in this swamp with over ten thous- 
and loads of debris, at a cost of nearly $1,600.00, 
and has made it more than nve times as val- 
uable as the property whica he traded for what 
everyone called a "worthless swamp." Mr. 
Whiteman is highly esteemed as a business 
man who has won success by deserving it. He 
nas been twice married, his first wife being 
Miss Mary Burroughs. After her death he 
married Miss Annie Van Wagner, and resides 
in a new home at No. 466 Vistula avenue. 




WILLIAM F. WHITEMAN. 

Mr. William F. Whiteman, senior member of 
the firm of Whiteman Bros., wholesale grocers 
and manufacturing confectioners, is a native 
of Portage Township, St. Joseph County, 
Indiana, where he was born February 1, 1865. 



WILLIAM F. WHITEMAN. 

a radius of one hundred miles of South Bend. 
Mr. Whiteman is a careful business man ot 
ability and strict honor. He has been twice 
married, his first wife, whom he married in 



SOUTH BEND. 



261 



1SS6, being Miss Maudie Matthews, who died 
in 1899. He then married Miss Laura E. Man- 
nering of Greene Township, and with his es- 
timable wife resides at No. 322 South St. Jo- 
seph street. 



JOHN KLINGEL. 

One of the honored pioneer residents of 
South Bend was Mr. John Klingel, whose death 
occurred on April 23, 1900. He was one of the 
best known merchants of this city and had 
witnessed its giowth and progress from a mere 
struggling village. Mr. Klingel was born at 
Wallhallen, Rhein Pfa'-tz, Germany, August 31, 
1835. His father, Philip Klingel, was a brave 




jonx KLINGEL. 

soldier who had the honor of serving under 
Napoleon Bonaparte. In 1850 with his father, 
mother and sister he came to America, and 
landed in New York city. The family hist 
located in Rome, N. Y., but only remained 
there two years when they came to South 
Bend, and soon after settling here Mr. Klingel 
engaged in the shoe business. For more than 
twenty years he was one of the progressive 
and successful shoe merchants in this city. He 
always took a deep interest in the growth and 
prosperity of the city, and when the city was 
incorporated in 1865 Mr. Klingel was a member 
of the first City Council, but resigned before 
his second term expired. In 1867 he was 



appointed a member of the Board of Education 
and most ably served in that capacity until 
1SS3. Mr. Klingel s practical maxim in lite 
seemed to be to do good whenever the op- 
portunity offered uself. On December 6, 1851, 
he was married to Miss *ietta Dice, a daughter 
of the late John K. Dice of this city, and this 
most estimable lady still survives him. Three 
children were born to them: A. P. Klingel, who 
is Sergeant of Police and the Secretary of the 
Police Commission, Mrs. M. S. Kogers, of this 
city, and Mrs. Patrick Hagan of Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Klingel was made a member of Germama 
L.odge, No. 301, F. & A. M., upon the night or 
its institution. tie was also a member or 
South Bend Chapter, No. 29, K. A. M., and since 
1872 was affihiated with Warsaw Commandery, 
No. 10, Knights Templar. His funeral which 
was largely attended was conducted with im- 
posing Masonic ceiemonies, and his pail 
bearers were his fraternal brothers, ixnus 
Nickel, Jr., and Meyer Livingston of Germama 
L,odge; David R. Leeper and john Gal.agher of 
South Bend Lodge, and Samuel T. Applegate 
and John T. Kelly of St. Joseph L,odge. Mr. 
Klingel was a sterling and progressive lepre- 
sentative of the higher German citizenship in 
America, and his death was mourned by a 
large circle of friends. 



CAPT. ANDREW F. TIPTON. 

Captain Andrew Fleming Tipton, whose 
lamented death occurred in this city on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1S95, was well known in this com- 
munity and was a brave soldier, a cultured 
gentleman and an honored citizen. Capt. Tip- 
ton was born near Canton, Ohio, January 31, 
1837. When he was quite young his parents 
removed to St. Joseph County, Indiana, and 
located on a farm near this city. He learned 
the trade of a printer and for some years was 
engaged on the Register with Hon. Schuyler 
Colfax. In 1857 he removed to Iowa and in 
1S60 was the publisher of a paper at Gutten- 
berg, and later at Elkader, Iowa. On Sept. 30, 
1863 he enlisted as lieutenant of Company 1, 
Eighth Iowa Cavalry and was afterward pro- 
moted to a Captain. He participated in all the 
important battles of the Army of the Tennessee 
and on July 30, 1864 was taken prisoner at 
Newman, Georgia. For nearly a year he suf- 
fered untold hardships at the hands of the 
rebels. On March 1, 1865 he succeeded in 
getting into the Union lines and was discharge! 
as a paroled prisoner of war. He was after- 
ward seized with hemmorhage of the lungs and 
confined in the hospital at Benton Barracks, St 
Louis. He finally reached Elkader and resumed 



262 



SOUTH BEND. 



his newspaper work. In 1S66 he retired from 
journalism and engaged in the drug business 
and in 1868 he was appointed postmaster and 
ably served for five years. In 1878 he was 
railroad mail agent between LaCrosse and 



% 



t** 



J 



/ 



QP 



ff* 



past five years, and has been an important 
factor in the permanent improvement of the 
city. Mr. Robert was born near Montreal, Can- 
ada. August 10, 1854. He is the son of Hubert 
Robert, a well known farmer in that locality. 
He received his education in the schools near 
his home, and then learned the trade of a car- 
penter. When he was seventeen years of age 
he went to Chicago, 111., where he worked as a 
carpenter until 1872 when he located in South 
Bend. Here he followed his trade and acted as 
foreman at Notre Dame for several years. He 
was then employed as foreman of the construc- 
tion department at Studebakers for four years, 
after which he engaged in the contracting bus- 
iness on his own account in this city. He was 
interested in the erection of the Locke school, 
and a number of handsome residences for lead- 
ing citizens of South Bend. In 1895 he con- 
nected himself with Martin Hoban and Martin 
J. Roach, under the firm name of Robert. Hoban 
& Roach. The firm has laid the brick pave- 
ments and built the sewers in leading streets 
of the city and the entire sewer system of Mish- 
awaka was constructed by this firm as was also 



I'Al'T ANDREW F. TIPTON. 

Dubuque, serving until 18S4, when he was 
transferred to the South and ran between 
Vicksburg and New Orleans. In 18S6 he came 
to South Bend where he resided until his 
death. For three years he was engaged as 
traveling agent for the South Bend Chillea 
Plow Company and then entered the insurance 
business. His last engagement was with the 
Bissell Chilled Plow r Company, but in Decem- 
oer, 1894, he was taken seriously ill and was 
unable to work afterward. Captain Tipton 
was married to Miss Louise Whitney, and this 
most estimable lady survives him. Mrs. Tipton 
is most active in the great work of the 
Woman's Relief Corps. He also left a son, 
Schuyler C. Tipton, who is connected with the 
postal department in this city. Captain Tipton 
was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He 
was a member of Auten Post No. 8, G. A. R., 
and of St. Joseph Lodge No. 45. F. & A. M. His 
funeral was conducted by the Masons and his 
comrades of Auten Post. 



JOSEPH E. ROBERT. 

The well known contracting and building 

firm of Robert, Hoban & Roach, of which Mr. 

Joseph E. Robert is the senior member, has 

been in successful business in the city for the 




.losKI'II K. HllliKKT, 

the admirable sewer of the Singer Mfg., Co. 
The firm erected the Studebaker Warehouse, 
the Gymnasium and theological seminary at 
Notre Dame, and a large amount of public work 
of importance. Mr. Robert was an alderman 
and represented the fourth and seventh wards 
from 1SSS to 1891, and served as Park Commis- 
sioner for two years. He is a gentleman of ad- 



SOUTH BEND, 



203 



vanced ideas, thoroughly practical and progres- 
sive and is a business man of experience, abil- 
ity and forceful energy. Fraternally he is as- 
sociated with the Foresters and the Catholic 
Knights. He was married to Miss Angelina De 
Sormiers, a native of Canada, and with an in- 
teresting family of five children resides at No. 
319 North St. Louis street. 



MARTIN J. ROACH. 

Mr. Martin J. Roach has been an energetic 
and progressive member of the well known 
contracting and building firm of Robert, Hoban 
& Roach since its organization in 18y5. He 
was born in this city November 9, 1856, and is 
the son of William Roach. Mr. Roach at- 
tended the public schools here and afterwards 
attended the University of Notre Dame for two 
terms. He became a practical mason and for 
several years was foreman of mason work at 
Notre Dame. He afterward engageu in the 
contracting business on his own account which 
he continued for several years. In 1895 he 
formed his present partnership witn Joseph 
E. Robert and Martin Hoban, and the firm has 
since been prominently known as Robert. 
Hoban & Roach. This firm has acquired a 
justly high reputation for the superior and 




MARTIN J. HOACH. 

thorough nature of its work, and it has been an 
important factor in the public improvements 
of the city. Mr. Roach is a master of his 
piofession.and is one of the most conscientious, 



straightforward and reliable men engaged in 
the business of public contracting. He was 
elected as alderman from the seventh ward 
and most ably served from 1S90 to 1893. He 
is at present a member of the Board oi Park 
Commissioners which office he has held for 
seven yeais. He is a practical man in every 
sense of the word and successful. He resides 
at No. 905 South Bend avenue. 



MARTIN HOBAN. 
Among the successful contractors in 



this 



city is Mr. Martin Hoban, of the firm of Robert, 
Hoban & Roach, whose office and yards are 




MAUTIN HOBAN. 

located at No. 313 North Emerick street. Mr. 
Hoban was born in Portland, Maine, November 
1852, and is the son of Thomas Hoban, who 
removed with his family to South Bend in 
1856. He attended the Brothers and Sisters 
School in this city, and for five yeas was fore- 
man in the mason department at Notre Dame. 
He afterwards engaged in the contracting busi- 
ness for hinise.f and constructed the buildings 
at St. Mary's Academy, St. riedwige's Church 
and school house, St. Patrick's church, Wilson 
Bros. Shirt Factory, McDonald's Studio, and a 
number of piivate residences and commercial 
buildings. In partnership with Sorden Lister- 
he was engaged in the construction of the 
sewers and other works of prominence. They 
also built the engine house for No. 4 Hose 
Company and erected the river wall at Howard 



264 



SOUTH BEND. 



Park and the City Water Works on Michigan 
street. In 1893 Mr. Hoban was connected with 
the South Bend Construction Company. In 
1895 he associated himself with Joseph E. 
Robert and Martin J. Roach, under the firm 
name of Robert, Hoban & Roach, and this firm 
has become the leading general contractors 
for building construction, street and sewer im- 
provements, stone bridges and cuiverts, and 
make a specialty of boiler setting and tall 
chimney construction. Mr. Hoban is a prac- 
tical and progressive business man. He rep- 
resented the fourth ward in the city council 
from 1884 to 1888 and was city commissioner 
for six years. He is prominent in the com- 
munity and enjoys the esteem of all. Mr. 
Hoban was married to Miss Judie E. Downey, 
of Rome, N. Y., and with his estimable wife 
and family consisting of three sons and a 
daughter, resides at No. 205 North St. Louis 
street. 



JOSEPH N. CALVERT. 

Mr. Joseph N. Calvert, the well known and 
popular Justice of the Peace, is a native of 
South Bend, and was born here October 28, 




JOSEPH N. I ALVEKT. 

1845. His father Isaac D. Calvert, was a well 
known mechanic here, and his mother was 
Mary (Defrees) Calvert. Until he was 
twelve years of age he attended the public- 
schools here and in 1857 he removed with his 



family to Iowa City, Iowa, where he also at- 
tended school and finished his education in 
the high school. In 1860-1S61 he was in Co.- 
orado and spent most of the time at Pike's 
Peak and vicinity. In 1862 he completed his 
education in the University of Notre Dame, 
and then enlisted in Co. F, 2znd Indiana Vol- 
unteer infantry, whose regiment was at- 
tached to the 14th Army Corps. Mr. Calvert 
served with distinction and valor in Georgia 
and the Carolinas. He was with Snernian in 
his famous march to the sea, and participated 
in all of the great battles under tnat intrepid 
leader. He was in the famous battles of At- 
lanta, Amesbo.o and at Brentvhle, N. (J., and 
many others. Mr. Caivert was discharged at 
Washington in 1865 ana mustered out at Indi- 
anapolis. He returned to South Bend and 
engaged in the carpenter contracting Business 
in which he successfully remained until 1898. 
in that year he was elected Justice of the Peace 
on the Republican ticket, and has served two 
years of his term of four. His official acts 
are characterized with justice in its broadest 
sense and he has won the confidence ana es- 
teem of all. He is City Police Magistrate and 
is fear.ess in the discharge of his duties and a 
terror to evil aoers. He is prominent in social 
and fraternal life and is a member of St. Jos- 
eph Lodge, No. 45, F. & A. M., the Maccabees, 
the Order of the Eastern Star, and the Grand 
Army of the Republic, being a memDer of 
Norman Eddy Post. He was married in 1865 
to Miss V. L. Massey, and has one son, Charles 
B. Calvert, a law student, and resides at No. 
329 South Main street. 



RICHARD IN vVOOD. 

Mr. Richard Inwood, whose death occurred 
in this city on January 9, 1888, was well known 
in South Bend and in Northern Indiana, where 
for more than half a century he ^ad been 
identified with its material growth and prog- 
ress. Mr. Inwood was born in Holybourne, 
County Hampshire, England, February 3, 1812. 
He came of a family of twelve chlidren, the 
eldest of whom was Mrs. Matthews, the mother 
of the late George W. Matthews, and one of 
his brothers, Augustus Inwood, is still living 
in this city. In the spring of 1833 Mr. In- 
wood with two brothers and sisters left their 
native country. They landed in New York 
May 19, of that year, and arrived in South Bend 
on July 6, 1833. Shortly after the brothers 
preempted 160 acres of land in Center Town- 
ship, but finally disposed of their land and re- 
moved to this city. Here they decided to es- 
tablish a brewery, and they constructed quite 



SOUTH BEND 



265 



a large plant on South Michigan street, which 
had scarcely reached completion when it was 
entirely destroyed by fire. Mr. Richard In- 
wood obtained a position as bookkeeper for 
the old St. Joseph Iron Company at Mishawaka, 



Studebaker, David Stover, Thelus M. Bissell, 
A. G. Cushing and George W. Baker. Mrs. 
Inwood still resides in the old homestead at 
No. 513 West Washington street, and her de- 
clining years are passed in comfort and in 
the consciousness of a life of well doing and 
delicate usefulness. 





» 



JOHN Y. SLICK. 

Mr. John Y. Slick, proprietor and founder of 
the popular Slick's St. Joe Laundry, is one of 
the successful business men of South Bend. He 
is a native of the Buckeye State and was born 
at Canal Fulton, Starke County. Ohio, October 
17, 1S43. In 1860 Mr. Slick came to South Bend 
where he has since made his home and where 
he has been engaged in successful business. In 
1862 he enlisted in Co. C. 73rd. Regiment Ind- 
iana Volunteer Infantry, and served three years 
during the civil war, and was mustered out as 
a second lieutenant in July, 1865. He returned 
to South Bend and was engaged in the grocery 
business for several years as a member of the 
firm of Slick Bros., and in 1SS1 he established 
the St. Joe Laundry on Water street. The bus- 



K1CIIAKD INWOOD. 

and while there made the acquaintance and 
won the friendship of Mr. James Oliver, who 
was then working in the foundry, which grew 
stronger with years and continued until his 
death. He again went to farming in Center 
Township in 1844, where he remained until 
1867, when he removed to South Bend, and 
resided here until his deatn. In January, 
1861, he was manied to Miss Martha Greene, 
of Greene Township, who survives him, and 
who is still in excellent health. He left three 
children by a former marriage: Mr. William 
Inwood of this city, Mrs. George Matthews, and 
George Inwood, and one son, Richard G. In- 
wood, by his last marriage. Mr. Inwooa was 
a man of high character and most scrupulous 
habits and business methods and was the soul 
of honor and won and retained the esteem 
of the entire community. He was an earnest 
Christian and a life long member of the First 
M. E. Church. His death was generally 
mourned and his funeral was attended by a 
large concourse of his friends. The religious 
rites were performed by the Revs. H. M. Mid- 
dleton and George T. Keller, and those who 
gently bore his remains to their last resting 
place were his old friends James Oliver, Clem 




JOHN Y. SLICK. 

iness grew rapidly and later Mr. Slick removed 
to his present location No. 112 East Jefferson 
street, where he has one of the best equipped 
steam laundries in the city. Every modern 
appliance and convenience is used with all of 
the latest machinery and the laundry does a 



2(10 



SOUTH BEND. 



constantly increasing trade, and gives employ- 
ment to about twenty-five persons. Mr. Slick 
is a business man of the highest standing and 
prominence and enjoys the confidence and 
esteem of all who know him. 



CHARLES H. McCARTY. 

Mr. Charles Harlan McCarty, deputy sheriff 
and turnkey at the St. Joseph County Jail, is a 
son of Sheriff Charles E. McCarty, and is * 
young man of wide popularity. He is a native 
of St. Joseph County and was born at Walker- 
ton, Ind., July 16, 1876. When a child his par- 
ents removed to Garrett, Ind., and here he re- 
ceived his first education in the public schools. 
Young McCarty had the advantages, subse- 
quently, of a careful training and education. 
He attended the public schools at Peru, Ind, 
and Bellevue, Ohio, and also attended the catho- 
lic convents at Streator, 111., and at Covington, 
Ky. He then returned to Walkerton and grad- 
uated at the high school and completed his edu- 
cation upon his graduation at Michaels Univer- 
sity at Logansport, Ind. After he graduated he 
returned to Walkerton, and for six years lived 
with his parents on the farm. He next removed 
to Walkerton where he was clerk in his father's 



highest credit. Mr. McCarty also acted as guard 
at the Indiana State Prison at Michigan City 
under Warden Harley. He is a young man of 
magnificent physique and rare mental attain- 
ments and is highly esteemed by all who know 
him as a courteous gentleman and efficient and 
fearless officer of the law. 



CLAUDE K. HOWELL. 
Among our successful architects is Mr. Claude 
K. Howell, who is one of the mose artistic 
members of his profession and whose office is at 





CIIAKI.ES II. M CABTT. 

hotel for two years. In 1898, when his father 
was elected sheriff, he came to this city as 
deputy sheriff and turnkey at the county jail, 
which responsible position he has filled with the 



CLAUDE K. HOWELL. 

No. 230 South Michigan street. Mr. Howell was 
born at Donaldsonville, La., Nov. 27, 1869. He 
is a son of Perry Howell, a successful hotel 
proprietor, now deseased. Mr. Howell early 
evinced a taste and talent for architecture, and 
when eleven years of age he entered the studio 
of L. L. Stein, the celebrated architetct of To- 
ledo, Ohio, with whom he remained four years. 
After his father's death his mother removed to 
Lexington, Ky., and afterward to Covington, 
Ky., and the young man spent an additional 
two years with Hanaford & Son, of Cincinnati. 
He then went to Chicago and was engaged in 
the office of Burnham & Root, the leading archi- 
tects of that city. He next went to Kansas City 
with Mr. Walter Root, and he designed 
buildings in Atlanta, Georgia, Washing- 
ton. D. C, Columbus, Ohio, and Wichita, 
Kansas. He then returned to Chicago 
and was connected with the World's Fair as 



SOUTH BEND 



207 



superintendent and had charge ot the construc- 
tion of a number of the buildings for the great 
exposition. While in Chicago he erected a 
handsome residence for D. H. Norris, costing 
$150,000.00. He came to South Bend in lSy:J 
and since that time has been a factor in the 
architectural development of this city. He has 
designed a number of handsome residences for 
prominent citizens of South Bend, Mishawaka, 
Elkhart, Niks and other cities, among which 
may be mentioned those of Samuel Stull, Mrs. 
0. M. Humbert. William Hildebrand, W. B. 
Pershing and a number of others He has also 
erected a handsome building for the South Bend 
Remedy Company, and a warehouse for W. H. 
Hildebrand. His latest work is a handsome 
cottage at Diamond Lake for prominent South 
Bend parties, and an imposing and artistic en- 
tranceway and gateway for the new Riverview 
Cemetery of this city. He has also prepared an 
elaborate and handsome index map of the City 
of South Bend, on a scale of 500 feet to the inch. 
Mr. Howell is an expert in his profession and 
is popular in the community, and a member of 
the Knights of Pythias. 



WILBERT WARD. 

The appointment of Mr. Wilbert Ward as 
City Attorney, under the new charter, has met 




father George Ward being a retired farmer. 
His grandfather settled in St. Joseph County ir. 
1837 and his father's brothers are Andrew J. 
Ward of this city and Simon and Jacob Ward of 
Mishawaka, all successful men. Mr. Ward re- 
sided in Mishawaka until he was thirteen years 
old, and then moved to a farm in Clay township 
where he lived until he left the county to en- 
gage in the profession of teaching. He taught 
in the district schools of the county when he 
was seventeen and earned the means to attend 
De Pauw University and graduated in 1884, and 
later was given the degree of A. M. 
For two years he was principal of the hign 
school at Anderson, Ind., and was admitted x, > 
the bar in 1888. During the latter year he came 
to South Bend and commenced the gener;i] 
practice of the law and has acheived deserved 
success. From 18S9 to 1893 Mr. Ward was 
Deputy Revenue Collector for this district and 
he was City Attorney from 1894 to 1898. In 
1S98 he was reappointed Deputy Revenue Col- 
lector and still holds that office. Mr. Ward has 
always taken an active interest in politics and 
is one of the leading republicans in this section 
of the state. He was chairman of the Republi- 
can City and County Central Committee in 1S94 
and 1896. In 1895 he had charge of the printing 
of the city ordinances and wrote, codified and 
revised, under one ordinance, all of the city 
ordinances under the enlarged powers given to 
the common council by the new charter. He 
is the first president of the St. Joseph Bar As- 
sociation, and is a member of the Methodist 
church but is not bound by any creed and is 
ready to hear the truth from any source. Mr. 
Ward was married to Miss Alice Chearhart, of 
St. Joseph County, and with his accomplished 
wife and son, Wilbert, Jr., resides at No. US 
East Marion street. 



WILBERT WARD. 

with the favor and approval of the community 
in every sense. Mr. Ward is a native of St. 
Joseph County and was born April 19, 1861, his 



GEORGE L. RUSH. 
Mr. George Leland Rush, of the prominent 
real estate firm of Rush & Warner, located at 
No. 211 East Jefferson street, is a native of 
South Bend and is well known in this commu- 
nity. He was born in this city February 4, 
1864, and is the son of DeWitt Clinton Rush, 
who was a well known business man. Mr. Rush 
received his education in the public and high 
schools of South Bend, and for a number of 
years was engaged as a traveling salesman for 
prominent confectionery firms in Port Huron 
and Detroit, Mich. About six years ago he en- 
gaged in the real estate, loan and insurance 
business, which he conducted until 1898, when 
he formed a partnership with Mr. William 
C. Warner, under the firm name of Rush & War- 
ner. The firm deals exclusively in real estate 



268 



SOUTH BEND, 



and negotiates loans on real estate, and is the 
local agent for the following fire insurance 
companies: The Western, of Toronto; the Man- 
chester of England; the British American of 
Toronto; the Traders of Chicago; the Pennsyl- 




until he was sixteen years of age. In 1874 he 
was apprenticed to the Inquirer Printing A. 
Publishing Company, of Lancaster, where he 
remained about six years. In 1881 he was a 
clerk in the store of Messrs Watt & Shand in 
Lancaster, where he remained three years, 
when he was promoted to head bookkeeper, aud 
continued in the employ of the firm until 1888. 
During that year, in company with W. Scott 
Adler and Alfred A. Coble he came to South 
Bend and established the present successful 
business, under the firm, name of Chillas. Adler 
& Coble. This partnership continued until 
September 1898 when Messrs Adler and Coble 
withdrew and since that time Mr. Chillas has 
conducted the business alone. His handsomely 
appointed store is located at No. Ill North 
Michigan street, and he carries the most exten- 
sive line of imported and domestic dry goods in 
the west. Mr. Chillas is one of the leading 
merchants of this city. During his residence in 
Lancaster Mr. Chillas was clerk of the Commoi 
Council of that city for six years. Since com- 
ing to South Bend he has always been recog- 
nized as a public spirited and progressive citi- 
zen and he has also been foremost in many sub- 
stantial acts of public charity and benevolence. 
On June 11, 1891, Mr. Chillas was married to 



GEOBGE L. BUSH. 

vania of Philadelphia; the Sun of New Orleans; 
the Equitable of Providence, and the Michigan 
Fire and Marine of Detroit. Mr. Rush is an 
energetic and progressive business man and en- 
joys a high reputation in the business commun- 
ity of this city. He was married to Miss Grace 
M. Sherman, of Knox, Indiana, and with his 
estimable wife and an interesting daughter re- 
sides at No. 317 Lacorte avenue. 



JACOB M. CHILLAS. 

Mr. Jacob M. Chillas was born in the city of 
Lancaster, Pa.. November 27, 1858. He is the 
son of James Humes Chillas and Elizabeth 
(Milleysach) Chillas. His father was a scotch- 
man by birth, but early came to America, and 
for years was the master mechanic of the great 
shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad. He was 
killed when in the United States service, during 
the rebellion, at Harrison's Landing, Virginia, 
on November 16, 1862. The son, then but four 
years old, was placed by his mother in the 
Home for Friendless Children at Lancaster, 
Pa., where he received his early education, and 
he was afterward transferred to the Mt. Joy 
Soldier's Orphans Asylum, where he remained 




JACOB M. CHILLAS. 



Miss Lydia Studebaker, a daughter of Henry 
and Susan Studebaker, of this city, and has a 
family of two beautiful and interesting children. 
Gertrude, who was born in April 1894 and 



SOUTH BEND. 



269 



Henry, born in July 1899. He is a member of 
the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities and 
the Commercial-Athletic Club, and has been 
treasurer of the Board of Masonic Trustees for 
five years. He is also the president of the Bow- 
man Cemetery Company. Mr. Chillas with his 
estimable wife and family resides at No. 517 
South Main street. 



GEORGE B. AND JOHN D. BEITNER. 

For nearly fifty years the name of Beitner 
has been prominently identified with the mer- 
cantile community of South Bend. Forty eight 
years ago Mr. John G. Beitner commenced bus- 
iness in this city and today his two sons are 
successfully conducting the business so auspic- 
iously started by their honored father who Is 
now deceased. The present firm is now com- 
posed of Mr. George B. Beitner and Mr. John D. 
Beitner and their handsome establishment is 
located at No. Ill South Michigan street. Mr. 
George B. Beitner. the elder of the two brothers 
was born in this city August 12, 1857 and ac- 
quired his education in the public schools of 



two sons assumed full control of the business, 
and have maintained its high reputation in 
every particular. Mr. Beitner is an active and 
energetic merchant of the progressive school 
and has won the esteem of the entire commu- 





GEORGE B. BEITNER. 

South Bend. When old enough he entered his 
father's store and so valuable an assistant did 
he prove that he soon obtained an interest in 
the business in connection with his brother, and 
the firm was then known as Beitner & Sons. 
After the decease of the elder Mr. Beitner the 



JOHN D. BEITNER. 

nity. He is a member of the Indiana and Com- 
cial Athletics Clubs and the Turner Society, 
and is fraternally connected with the Knights 
of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen. He was 
married to Miss Flora L. Shively, and resides at 
No. 311 West Navarre street. Mr. John D. 
Beitner was also born in South Bend April 11, 
1870. He received his education and is a gradu- 
ate of the high school in this city, and then was 
associated witn his father and brother in bus- 
iness. He is a member of the Indiana Club, 
and the Twentieth Century Club of Mishawaka. 
He is a genial gentleman and popular in the 
social circles of this city. They are both gen- 
tlemen of refinement and culture and have 
hosts of friends. 



CHARLES L. GOETZ. 
Mr. Charles L. Goetz, who was selected by 
Mayor Colfax as a member of the Board of 
Commissioners of the Department of Public 
Works under the operation of the new city 
charter, is well known in South Bend, and his 
appointment to that important office has been 
received with general favor and public ap- 
proval. Since he was twenty-one years of age Mr. 
Goetz has been a resident of South Bend, and 



270 



SOUTH BEND 



has been prominently identified with its com- 
mercial interests. He is thoroughly versed in 
the needs of the city in the matter of public im- 
provements, and his presence on the board will 
be to the benefit and advantage of the tax pay- 
ers of the city. Mr. Goetz is well known here 
as an extensive manufacturer of cigars, and is 
recognized as a business man of high standing 
and ability. He is a native of New York and 
was born at Rome, Oneida County, in that state, 
January 22, 1859. He is a son of Casper and 
Mary (Holdereid) Goetz, who were well known 
in that locality. As a boy he was educated in 
the public schools of his native city, and was 
engaged there in business until 1S81 when he 
came to South Bend. In 1SS1 Mr. Goetz com- 
menced the manufacture of Havana and domes- 
tic cigars for the trade and has been successful 
in building up a large business. His establish- 
ment is located at No. 125 West Washington 
street and the excellence of the goods manufac- 
tured by him is universally acknowledged. His 
special brands are "Mirella," known as a high 
grade article and "Mirella Jr" and "Goetz No. 
1" are popular wherever they are known. He 
employs a large force of skilled workmen and 
his trade extends through Indiana, Michigan 
and Ohio. Mr. Goetz is well and prominently 
known in fraternal and social circles and en- 



lic official Mr. Goetz will bring to his new and 
important office the benefit of years of local re- 
sidence and abilities of a high order. 



FREDERICK A. MILDER 

Frederick A. Miller, who has been connected 
with the staff of the South Bend Tribune since 
1SS7. and who is now Editor of that newspaper 






CHARLES L. GOETZ. 



joys the esteem of all. He was married in 1S83 
to Miss Emma Klingel, a daughter of Valentine 
Kliiigel, of this city, and his residence is lo- 
cated at 404 North Lafayette street. As a pub- 



FREDERICK A MILLER. 

and vice-president of the Tribune Printing Co., 
was born in South Bend January 31, 1868. He 
is the only son of the late Alfred B. Miller, the 
able journalist and writer who was one of the 
founders of the Tribune. Mr. Miller received 
his education in the public schools of this city 
and graduated from the high school in 18S7. 
Having some taste for journalistic pursuits he 
associated himself with the Tribune soon after 
leaving school as a reporter. Sometime after 
the death of his father he became editor of the 
paper. Mr. Miller was married June 8, 1892, to 
Miss Flora Dunn, second daughter of Mr. B. F. 
Dunn, of this city. Mr. Miller and his mother, 
Mrs. Alfred B. Miller, have a pleasant home at 
435 South Michigan street. 



WILLIAM I. HUNT. 

Mr. William I. Hunt, junior member of the 
firm of Hunt Bros., manufacturers of wagons 
and carriages, whose factory is located at Nos. 
332-334 South Scott street, was born at Trenton. 
Dodge County, Wis., July 22, 1863. His father, 



SOUTH BEND. 



William D. Hunt, was a successful carriage 
builder, and his mother was Diantha (Dunham) 
Hunt. Until he was twenty-three years of age 
Mr. Hunt resided at Brandon, and there atten- 
ded the public schools and also learned his trade 
In 1887 he came to South Bend and at once 
found employment with the Birdsell Manufac- 
turing Co., where he remained until 1891 when 
he started in business alone. In 1893 
he admitted his brother, G. S. Hunt, to partner- 
ship under the style of Hunt Bros., and until 
1S90 the business was located on West Division 
street. During 1900 the firm erected and moved 
into its present handsome building at Nos. 332- 
334 South Scott street. The building is a 
modern two story structure and was built espec- 
ially for the business and contains office, re- 
pository, paint and wood working shops and 
blacksmith shops. The factory is modernly 
equipped and a force of skilled hands are con- 
stantly at work. The firm manufactures a fine 
line of heavy wagons, carriages, cutters, etc, 
and does painting and repairing, and general 
blacksmithin", and transacts a large and con- 




WILLIAM I. IIUNT. 

stantly increasing business. Mr. Hunt is a bus- 
iness man of the strictest integrity and is pure- 
ly a self made man in all that the term implies. 
He was married in 1S86 to Miss Hettie Jewett 
who died in 1898.. He was married the second 
time to Miss Ida Barnhart, and resides at No. 
918 Laporte avenue. 



GEORGE S. HUNT. 
Mr. George S. Hunt, of the popular firm of 
Hunt Bros, manufacturers of light and heavy 
wagons, carriages, etc., at Nos. 332-334 Soutls 
Scott street, is a native of Wisconsin, and was 
born in Washington County, April 4, 1859. He 




GKonnE S. HUNT. 

is a son of William D. Hunt and Diantha (Dun- 
ham) Hunt. His father was a successful wagon 
maker, and when but a child his parents moved 
to Brandon, Dodge County, Wis., and here 
young Hunt was educated and learned the trade 
of an expert painter. In 1880 he came to South 
Bend and for thirteen years was employed at 
his trade, one year in the Studebaker and twelve 
years in the Oliver plants. In 1893 he went in- 
to partnership with his brother, William I. 
Hunt, under the style of Hunt Bros. The firm 
was originally in business on West Division 
street, but the business increased so rapidly 
that the present factory was erected in 1900. 
It is completely fitted and equipped with office, 
repository, woodworking and paint shops, and 
the firm builds a fine line of carriages, road and 
delivery wagons, heavy wagons, cutters, etc., 
and does general repairing and blacksmithing. 
Mr. Hunt is an expert at his trade and is a 
careful and up to date business man. He was 
married in 1883 to Miss Emma McBroom, of 
Marshall County, Indiana, and resides at No. 
1716 Michigan avenue. 



272 



SOUTH BEND 



EDWARD PHILLIPS. 

Mr. Edward Phillips, is a native of St. Joseph 
County, and was horn in Center Townshin, 
March 27, 1854, and his father. Randolph Phil- 
lip-, was a successful farmer in that locality. 
His father died in 1857, when Edward was but 




line. Mr. Phillips is an active and energetic 
business man of the highest standing and honor 
and is known as one of the most skilled decora- 
tors in this section, and one whose judgment in 
art work is of the highest. Mr. Phillips is a 
member of the Commercial-Athletic Club, the 
Masons and the Knights of Pythias. He was 
married to Miss Amanda Rinehart, of Center 
Township, and with his estimable wife resides 
at No. 611 South Michigan street. 



CHARLES A. FRANCIS. 

One of the most expert and successful car- 
riage builders in the country is Mr. Charles A. 
Francis, the able Superintendent of the Car- 
riage Works, of the Studebaker Bros. Manufac- 
turing Company of this city. Mr. Francis was 
born in the city of London, Ontario, January 9, 
1852, and is a son of Mr. Thomas Francis and 
Jane (Agnew) Francis. He was reared and 
educated in the city of his nativity, and when 
he had completed his education became an in- 
dentured apprentice to John Campbell of Lor.- 



EUWARD PHILLIPS. 

three years of age, and his early boyhood was 
passed on the farm. In fact, Mr. Phillips speiu 
nearly twenty-five years in farming pursuits, 
during which time he managed to secure an 
education in the district schools and to learn 
the trade of a painter and grainer. In 1885 he 
came to South Bend and at once was recognized 
as an artistic workman and for years his ser- 
vices as a grainer was in demand by the master 
painters of this city. In 1890 he formed a part- 
nership with Mr. Isaac Lower, under the style 
of Lower & Phillips, and the firm became the 
leading painting and decorating establishment 
of the city. Among the buildings painted and 
decorated by the firm may be mentioned the 
Oliver Hotel, the Auditorium, the new Court 
House, the Commercial Athletic Club, and many 
handsome residences. On December 1. 1900, 
Mr. Phillips retired from the firm and on March 
1, 1901 started in business alone at No. S25 
South Michigan street, where he has a nice 
store completely stocked with the latest in wall 
papers, deocrative papers. freizes. panels, 
paints, etc. He employs a force of most skilled 
painters and decorators, and makes contracts 
for the highest class of work in the decorative 




CHARLES <;. FRANCIS. 

don. Ontario, where he served his apprentice- 
ship, and learned the carriage wood workers 
trade. Having finished his trade he went to 
Rochester, N. Y., where he was employed two 
years with James Cunningham Son & Co., car- 
riage builders, and then went west working at 
his trade in factories in Ohio, Indiana and Mis- 
souri. In 1S73 he came to South Bend and was 



SOUTH BEND, 



273 



employed by the Studebaker Bros. Manufactur- 
ing Company two or three years, when he left 
here and took full charge of the factory of 
Brown & Pray, at the corner of Broadway and 
39th streets, New York City. Here Mr. Francis 
had a wide experience in fine carriage building, 
and remained until the business was given up 
by the dissolution of the partnership. He then 
accepted entire charge of the factory of George 
A. Ainsley & Son, at Richmond, Va., and later 
returned to New York City and accepted the 
position of draughtsman for "The Hub," the 
leading monthly publication of the carriage 
building trade. He next became draughtsman 
and designer for The Henry Kellain Company, 
of New Haven, Conn., where he remained until 
1884, when he was tendered and accepted the 
position of Superintendent of the Carriage 
Works of the Studebaker Bros., and came to 
this city. Since Mr. Francis has been at the 
head of this department he has seen the busi- 
ness increase more than ten fold, and has given 
to the department the accrued benefit of his 
long years of practical experience. Mr. Francis 
has nearly 1000 men under his supervision, and 
as may be expected, is a man of rare executive 
and administrative force, quick in perception 
and judgment, firm in determination, and a 
thoroughly progressive business man of modern 
ideas. He is prominent in social and fraternal 
circles, is a member of the Knights Templar, 
the Indiana Consistory, and a charter member 
of the Indiana Club. Mr. Francis was married 
in 1883 to Miss Nellie Crowley, of New Haven. 
Conn., and with his estimable wife and three 
children resides at 1012 East Jefferson street. 



GEORGE P. WAIDELY. 

Among the young and enterprising men who 
are ably assisting in the advancement of the 
great business of the Studebaker Bros. Manu- 
facturing Company, is Mr. George P. Waidely, 
manager of the World Buggy Department of 
that famous industry. Mr. Waidely is native jf 
the Peninsular State, and was born at Marshall, 
Mich., March 31, 1872. He is a son of Mr. John 
Waidely and Rosa (Slighly) Waidely. Young 
Waidely resided at Marshall until he was sev- 
enteen years of age, and received his education 
in the public schools, which he supplemented 
by a full course at the Devlin Business College 
at Jackson, Mich. When he had completed his 
education he entered the employ of the Jackson 
Wagon Company, at Jackson, Mich., where he 
remained less than two years, when he resigned 
to take a position with the Collin's Manufact- 
uring Company, of Jackson, manufacturers of 
vehicles. After tnree years with this company 



he took charge of the Webster Vehicle Com- 
pany where he remained a year and a half. In 
December 1897 he came to South Bend as as- 
sistant to the manager of the World Buggy De- 
partment of the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., and 
on January 1, 1899 was made manager of the 




I 



GEORGE P. WAIDELY. 

department. Mr. Waidely is a young man of 
rare business ability and that degree of push 
that makes for deserved success. He is thor- 
oughly in touch with the buggy trade of the 
country and his expert knowledge of it has ad- 
ded largely to the benefit of the company. Mr. 
Waidely is single and popular in social circles 
and highly esteemed by all who know him. 



OTTO C. BASTIAN. 

Mr. Otto C. Bastian was born in New York 
City June 8, 1864. His parents came to South 
Bend in 1S50 and remained in this city until 
1862 when they returned to New York. Here the 
young man was born, and in 1868 the family 
came back to South Bend. Mr. Bastian received 
his education in the public schools and in the 
normal school at Dansville, N. Y. He then 
thoroughly devoted himself to acquiring a prac- 
tical knowledge of the drug business and from 
1880 to 1885 he clerked in local drug stores. In 
the latter year he established himself in busi- 
ness at No. 407 South Chapin street, which he 
still owns. In 1889 he opened another hand- 
some pharmacy at No. 129 West Washington 



274 



SOUTH BEND. 



street, and he now manages both establish- 
ments with success. Mr, Bastian carries a full 
line of drugs and chemicals and druggists' sun- 
dries, and also deals extensively in kodaks, 
cameras and photographic supplies and paints 
and oils. He is an enterprising merchant and 
his skill in compounding prescriptions is recog- 
nized by the entire medical fraternity of thU 
city. He is a thorough business man and en- 
joys the esteem of the community. 



ANDREW J. HEARS. 
Although he has been a practioner at the 
bar of St. Joseph County only two years. Mr. 
Andrew J. Mears, ranks deservedly high among 
the active members of the local bar. He was 
born near Bowling Green. Ohio, in 1861. His 
parents died when he was but a child, and at 
fourteen years of age he was obliged to take up 
the problems of life alone. He attended the 
public schools of Bowling Green, and afterward 
studied law at Columbus. Ohio, where he grad- 
uated in 1888. He is an able and practical at- 
torney of the progressive type, and is an 
ardent advocate of advanced legislation to meet 
the requirements of present time? both financi- 
ally and commercially, and ae the attorney and 




ANDREW J. MEAKs. 

counsel of the Indiana Grocers Association he 
has been an important factor in suggesting 
legislation and in remedying many of the evils 
which previously existed. Mr. Mears is also the 
state organizer of the association. While a 



resident of Ohio he served two terms as mayor 
of Bowling Green, which reflected honor upon 
himself and were of practical service and bene- 
fit to the municipality. He also ably served as 
prosecuting attorney for Wood County, Ohio. 
About two years ago Mr. Mears removed to 
South Bend, and since that time has held a pro- 
minent place among the attorneys of this city, 
and has earned an enviable reputation as a 
conscientious and painstaking lawyer and coun- 
sellor. His office is located at No. 121 North 
Main street. Mr. Mears was married to Miss E. 
A. Burton and with his estimable wife and fam- 
ily consisting of a son and two daughters, re- 
sides at No. 533 Portage avenue. 



ROBERT WHEALY. 

The citizens of South Bend take just pride in 
the miles of well paved streets which may be 
termed an adornment of an enduring character 
and a substantial evidence of our municipal 
growth and progress. In accomplishing this 
result the Barber Asphalt Paving Company 
has proven a most important factor. Most of 
the principal streets of the city are paved with 
Trinidad asphalt for which this company is 
famous. Mr. Robert Whealy, the assistant 
superintendent of the company, has been 
identified with these local improvement for the 
past two years and on July 23, 1900 opened a 
handsome office in the new Arnold building. 
Mr. Whealy w-as born in Woodstock, County 
of Perth, Canada, November 24, 1858. His 
father, Thomas Whealy. was a farmer. In 
1864 the family moved to Iowa and the young 
man was reared in the northwest and received 
his early education in Cerro Gordo County. 
For ten years he was engaged in railroad 
construction work with the Burlington, Cedar 
Rapids & Northern, and has devoted himself to 
public works generally. He has been connected 
with the Barber Company since 1890. and has 
had charge of the street improvements in 
Louisville, Ky., Youngstown, 0.. Mt. Vernon. 
N. Y., Erie. Pa.. Elyria. 0.. Fort Wayne. 
Wabash, and La Fayette, Ind.; Detroit and Sag- 
inaw, Mich., and latterly in this city. Thus 
far the Company, under Mr. Whealy's superin- 
tendence, has laid their excellent and durable 
asphalt pavements in West Washington. La- 
fayette, Main, Colfax and East Jefferson 
street, from the bridge to the city limits, and 
a number of other streets will be improved in 
like manner in the near future. The character 
of the work done by this company has given 
general satisfaction and meets with the favor 
and sanction of our leading citizens. Mr. 
Whealy has charge of all work in Indiana and 



SOUTH BEND 



275 



will make his permanent headquarters in this 
city. He was married to Miss Barbara New- 
ton, a native of Iowa, who died February 17, 
1901, and has two interesting daughters aged 
respectively six and nine years. 



PATRICK J. HOULIHAN. 

Among the younger, but ambitious and suc- 
cessful members of the bar of St. Joseph Coun- 
ty, is Mr. Patrick J, Houlihan, who has been 




PATRICK .1. HOULIHAN. 

engaged in the active practice of his profession 
in this city since 1895. He is a native of South 
Bend and was born February 14, 1872, and his 
father, Paul Houlihan, now deceased, was an old 
resident of this city coming here shortly after 
the Civil war, and at one time was engaged in 
the stone business. His early education was 
acquired in the parochial schools, and he after- 
ward attended the University of Notre Dame, 
graduating from the law department of that in- 
stitution in 1S92. He was then engaged for two 
years in the freight office of the Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern railroad, and in 1894 was ad- 
mitted to the bar. In 1895 he commenced the 
practice of law, and for a year was associated 
with the office of Mr. Wilbert Ward of this city. 
At the end of that time Mr. Houlihan engaged 
in business for himself, and has achieved a well 
earned success. He is well versed in the law 
and makes a specialty of building and loan as- 
sociation and probate law. He is the attorney 



for the Jan III. Sobieski Building and Loan As- 
sociation, and is also the local agent for the 
Germania, of New York, and the Northwestern 
Underwriters of Milwaukee, both fire insurance 
companies. Mr. Houlihan takes an active in- 
terest in political affairs, and was the Demo- 
cratic candidate for Prosecuting Attorney in 
1898. He is well known in the community and 
has won the confidence and esteem of the bench 
and the bar. He is conscientious and painstak- 
ing in all matters entrusted to his care, and is 
regarded as a practical and safe adviser and 
attorney. His office is located at No. 121 North 
Main street, in the Nickel Building. Mr. Houli- 
han is genial and courteous and has a host of 
friends. He is fraternally associated with the 
Ancient Order of Hiberians, and the Knights of 
Columbia, and is a member of the Alumni As- 
sociation of Notre Dame. 



DR. WILLIAM F. MILLS. 

Dr. William Francis Mills, one of South 
Bend's successful and representative physicians, 
was born in the city of Joliet, 111., February 22, 
1856. His father, Andrew Jackson Mills, was a 
successful physician in that city, and is still 
living at Orlando, Florida. His mother was 




DR. WM. F. MILLS. 

Sarah E. (Whitmore) Mills, a native of the Key- 
stone state. When a boy Dr. Mills' parents 
moved South, and he had the benefits of an ex- 
cellent education. He attended the Normal 
University at Bloomington, 111., where he took 



276 



SOUTH BEND. 



a teachers course, and in 1875 began teaching 
in Will County. He continued in that profes- 
sion for six years. In 1881 he entered the Rush 
Medical College at Chicago, and during that 
year took the state examinations and received a 
diploma from the State Board of Medical Ex- 
aminers of Illinois to practice medicine. In 
1886 he graduated from Rush Medical College 
and began his practice in the city of Chicago. 
He later moved to Joliet, his former home, but 
becoming convinced of the splendid future for 
South Bend he determined to take up a perma- 
nent residence in this city, and came here in 
1899 where he has been in successful practice. 
After a residence of but six months he received 
the appointments of physician for both the 
county and township, the former office for one 
year, the later he still holds. Dr. Mills is 
widely known as an able and successful physi- 
cian, and has earned the enviable place he hold-- 
in the public confidence and esteem. He is 
most prominent in social and fraternal circles 
and is a member of the Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of the Maccabees, the Knights of Pyth- 
ias, the Tribe of Ben Hur. and the Knights and 
Ladies of Columbia. Dr. Mills is examining 
physician of the Ladies of the Maccabees, and 
also of the Knights of the Maccabees and the 
Tribe of Ben Hur. He was married in 1883 in 
Chicago to Miss Agnes R. McDonough, daughter 
of T. McDonough. one of Chicago's early set- 
tlers, he being a resident since 1838, and with 
his wife and daughter, Alice Elda, aged fifteen, 
resides at No. 213 North Main street. Dr Mills 
is a member of the Commercial-Athletic Club. 



in its managment since that time. Mr. Post has 
charge of the extensive jobbing business which 
comprises a wide range of standard articles 
used by grocers, confectioners and other mer- 
cantile houses throughout the country. The 
territory at present covered embraces Indiana, 
Michigan and Ohio, but the business is constant- 
ly increasing and expanding. The mills of the 
South Bend Paper Co. are located at Taylor- 
ville. 111., and the local warerooms and factory 



CHARLES F. POST. 

Mr. Charles F. Post, the efficient manager of 
the extensive paper and paper bag jobbing bus- 
iness of the South Bend Paper Co., is a descen- 
ded of a prominent New England family that 
came to America in 1634. His relatives have 
fought in every war in which the United States 
has participated including the Revolution and 
the Spanish wars. Mr. Post was born at Hol- 
land, Mich., June 22nd. 1874. His father, 
Charles F. Post, was a pioneer settler in that 
section and served through the Civil war. 
Young Post received his education in the pub- 
lic and high school of Holland, and after a short 
engagement as a steamboat clerk, he came to 
South Bend in 1S93, and was employed as a 
clerk by this company. Afterward he was en- 
gaged as a traveling salesman for the firm of 
C. H. Dunkle & Co.. and later for the Indiana 
Paper Co. for several years, and in 1898 he pur- 
chased an interest in the present business, anil 
has been associated with Mr. E. C. Westervelt 




CHARLES P. POST. 

are in the rear of 112-114 West Jefferson street. 
The company manufactures a superior grade of 
wrapping paper, and paper bags and also mach- 
inery for the manufacture of paper bags. In 
addition to the large line of paper goods, Mr. 
Post carries a full stock of candy, cheese, crack- 
ers and sweet goods. He is an active business 
man and manages the extensive business with 
skill and judgment. He was married to Miss 
Nellie P. Stanfield, a daughter of Mr. E. P. Stan- 
field and with his wife and child resides at No. 
821 Forest avenue. 



GEORGE W. FREYERMUTH. 
Mr. George W. Freyermuth, senior member 
of the firm of Freyermuth & Maurer, is a 
practical architect and builder of a high order 
of ability. He was born in Philadelphia,, Pa., 
May 8, 1869, and his father. Jacob Freyermuth, 
was a prominent carpenter and builder in the 
Quaker City. He moved to South Bend when 
his son was but three years of age, and the 



SOUTH BEND. 



277 



young man received his education in the public 
and high schools of this city. Mr. Freyermuth 
turned his attention to contracting and build- 
ing, and has erected a number of imposing 
structures in this city, among them may be 




and for several years was employed in the 
composing rooms of the Tribune and of H. C. 
Rupe & Co. When war with Spain was declared 
Harry 0. Perkins, who was imbued with the 
true spirit of American patriotism, enlisted 
April S, in the 157th Regiment Indiana Vol- 
unteers, and became a member of Company F. 
He went with the company to Indianapolis, 
Where they were mustered into service. The 
regiment was ordered to Chickamauga Park, 
and while there he was taken ill and confined 
to the hospital for several weeks. He was sent 
to Tampa, Florida, where he contracted hi? 
fatal illness, and was then taken to Fernandina. 
where he died. With heroic fortitude he battled 
with the dread disease, but all in vain, and with 
his dreams of soldierly valor unfulfilled his 
young life passed away, and the first martyr 
from South Bend to give up his life in the 
cause of humanity and freedom had gone to 
his eternal rest. His remains were brought 
home and his funeral was conducted with full 
military ceremonies the services being held at 
the First Presbyterian Church. It was a most 
impressive scene, and was attended by over 
8,000 of his friends, and the influential citizens 



UEO. W. PKEYBRMUTH. 

mentioned the Public Library, the South Bend 
Remedy Company's building, and many of the 
finest residences in the city. In 1S95 he formed 
a partnership with R. V. Maurer in the archi- 
tecture business, he is well known in this 
community and is a gentleman of ability and 
strict business methods. He was married to 
Miss Anna Bilstein, of South Bend, and resides 
in a pleasant and comfortable home at No. 617 
Vistula avenue. 



HARRY 0. PERKINS. 

The first soldier volunteer from this city Lo 
yield up his young life in the service of his 
country during the late war with Spain, was 
Harry O. Perkins, who died in camp at Fernan- 
dina, Florida, August 20, 189S. Young Perkins 
was born at Berrien Springs, Mich., January Z, 
1878, but most of his life was passed in South 
Bend. He was the son of Harvey W. Perkins, 
who for many years has been associated with 
the Tribune Printing Company, and Jennie 
(Olmsted) Perkins. He attended the public 
schools here, and was a close student and a 
leading scholar in his classes. On leaving 
school he decided to learn the printer's trade 




HARRY O. PERKINS. 

of South Bend. Business in the city was en- 
tirely suspended and all joined in paying 
homage to the memory of the young hero. The 
pall bearers were Harry Funston, Elmer R. 
Stoll, S. W. Allen, Rudolf ri. Horst, Charles 
Garwood and Andrew Shimp, all ex-members 



278 



SOUTH BEND. 



of Company F. The cortege was composed or 
members of the G. A. R. posts, the Maccabees, 
Catholic Knights of America, the Typographical 
Union, Perkins Club, and other bodies, Col. 
Joseph Turnock commanding and Elmer 
Crockett, acting as assistant. 



HARRY T. SNELL. 

Mr. Harry T. Snell, Manager of the South 
Bend branch of the Standard Oil Company, is a 
young business man who began at the bottom 
of the ladder and has won success by his own 
unaided efforts. Mr. Snell was born at Frank- 
lin, Warren County, Ohio, November 2, 1S67. 
His father, Ira M. Snell, was a prominent drug- 
gist, and his mother was Henrietta E. (Schneck) 
Snell. Until he was sixteen years of age young 
Snell lived at Franklin and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools there. In 1883 he 
went to Toledo, Ohio, where for a year he was 
employed in the local office of R. G. Dun & Co., 
when he went with the firm of Boehne & Swi- 
gert, wholesale jewelers. After a year and a half 
this firm removed its business to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and Mr. Snell remained with the firm un- 
til it dissolved partnership a year later. He 
then returned to Toledo, and on July 1, 18b0 
entered the employ of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany as office boy, and has been in the employ 
of that company since. Mr. Snell devoted his 
entire time to mastering the details of the busi- 
ness, and was gradually promoted from clerk- 
ship to clerkship and then to Assistant Man- 
ager at Toledo. On May 1, 1S99 he was pro- 
moted to manager and given charge of the 
branch distributing office located in this city, a 
position of great responsibility. The South 
Bend office directs and manages over sixty-four 
separate distributing stations embracing South 
ern Michigan from Lake Erie to Lake Michigan, 
and a large portion of the state of Indiana. 
The plant here is an extensive one embracing 
office, warehouses, barns, sheds, and eight 
immense storage tanks each having a capacity 
of from 12,000 to 25,000 gallons. From this 
point is shipped any of the grades of 
illuminating oils, gasoline, naptha, turpentine. 
lubricating oils, parrafine wax, axle grease 
and all petroleum products. Over this im- 
mense business Mr. Snell is watchful, and its 
direction requires administrative and executive 
abilities of a high order, all of which Mr. 
Snell possesses to a great degree. He was 
married in 1899 to Miss Nora E. Mutchler. of 
Toledo, and with his estimable wife resides at 
No. 730 Colfax avenue. 



R. V. MAURER. 

Mr. R. V. Maurer, of the firm of FreyermutU 
& Maurer, architects, is a young artist in his 
profession, of rare ability and progressive ideas. 
He is a native of South Bend and was born 
August 23, 1873, and his father, John Maurer, 
was a prominent local physician, now retired. 
Mr. Maurer acquired his education in the public 
and high schools and afterward attended the 
Chicago Athenaeum, and the Chicago Art Insti- 
tute, where he developed his artistic and 
architectural talents. He was afterwards 




B. V. MAl'KER. 

engaged in the offices of leading architects of 
Chicago, and then came to South Bend, in 1895, 
when he conected himself with Mr. George W. 
Freyermuth in their present successful busi- 
ness. Mr. Maurer is a member of Knights of 
the Globe and an active member of the Odd 
mellows fraternity in South Bend. 



CYRUS WALTER. 

Mr. Cyrus Walter is prominently engaged in 
the real estate, loan and insurance business in 
South Bend, and is one of the leading members 
of that profession. He was born in Snyder 
County, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1856, and his 
father, Isaac Walter, was a successful farmer 
and land owner. In 1861 the family came to 
Belleview, Sandusky County, Ohio, and here 
Mr. Walter received his early education. After 
ward they removed to Three Rivers, Michigan, 



SOUTH BE NiD. 



279 



and Mr. Walter spent several years in the 
active life of a farmer. In 1891 he came to 
South Bend and engaged in the produce com- 
mission business, and then conducted a dairy 
in this vicinity. Two years ago he engaged in 
the real estate business and has been a most 




two grandfathers were patriots in the revolu- 
tionary war. Mr. Lyon's family moved to 
Michigan in 1860 and located in Ypsilanti for 
several years and afterward removed to Van 
Buren County. Mr. Lyon's early education was 
received in the public schools, after which he 
learned the printer's trade in Decatur, 111. He 
came to South Bend in 1874 and for a year was 
in the composing room of the South Bend 
Tribune, and has been connected with that 
paper since. He was a member of the repor- 
torial force in 1875, city editor in 1878, and 
was made associate editor, later, and has 
labored in that capacity up to the present time. 
Mr. Lyon is a graceful and forceful writer and 
has a thorough knowledge of local events and 
personages from the earlier times to the pres- 
ent day. In connection with C. H. Bartlett he 
wrote and published the beautiful historic 
volume "LaSalle in the Valley of the St. 
Joseph" and has written a number of articles 
and papers of historical value and interest. 
Mr. Lyon is a thorough musician and has been 
identified with every musical organization i'i 
South Bend during the last quarter of a century. 
He is the director of the Choral Union of the 
First Presbyterian Church and has had charge 



CYRUS WALTER. 

successful dealer in South Bend realty. He is 
an active ana energetic man of progressive 
ideas and a firm believer in the rapid and sub- 
stantial growth of this city. He has won a 
wide circie of influential friends and his 
straightforward manner of conducting his busi- 
ness has earned for him a high reputation in 
the community. Mr. Walter also represents a 
number of prominent fire insurance companies 
and transacts a large business for his clients. 
He was married to Miss Tilie Wagner, of Colon, 
Mich., and with his family of three children, 
resides at No. 719 Vistula avenue. His office is 
located at No. i21 South Michigan street. 



RICHARD H. LYON. 

Mr. Richard H. Lyon, associate editor of the 
South Bend Tribune, is one of the progressive 
journalists of the state, and has been connected 
with that paper since 1874. He was born near 
Bridgeport, Conn., and his father, Capt. Eli 
Lyon, was well known in that locality, and his 
mother was Louisa Augusta (Winton) Lyon, 
whose father, Col. James Winton, commanded 
a Connecticut regiment in the war of 1812. His 




RICHARD H- LYON. 

of the music of that church since he organized 
the first quartette choir there in 1875. He is 
the author of several sacred songs and an- 
thems. Mr. Lyon was the original "Old Shady" 
and his services in political campaigns in a 



280 



SOUTH BEND. 



musical way nave made him popular in Michi- 
gan and Indiana for many years. He was mar- 
ried in 1S76 at Kalkaska, Mich., to Miss 
Frances A. Kurtz, a native of Buffalo, N. Y., 
and with his estimable wife resides in Chapiri 
Park. He is a prominent member of the North- 
ern Indiana Historical society, and is fra- 
ternally asociated with the National Union. 



W. 0. DAVIES. 

The Davies Shirt Company was incorporated 
under the laws of Indiana in 1900. with a 
capital stock of $5,000.00. The incorporators 
are William O. Davies, president; Warren T. 



CHARLES E. CROCKETT. 

Mr. Charles Elmer Crockett, the secretary of 
the Tribune Printing Company, is a native of 
South Bend, and was born August S, 1876. He 
is the son of Elmer Crockett, the president of 
the company, and a leading citizen, and of Anna 
(Miller) Crockett. He attended the public 
schools in this city and graduated from the 
High School in 1S94. Afterward he became a 
student of Wabash College, at Crawfordsville. 
Ind., and graduated from that institution in 
1898. While at College Mr. Crockett was th? 
Editor-in-Chief of the "Wabash" college publi- 
cation. After leaving college he was elected 
secretary of the Tribune Printing company 






(HAS. E. i Kill KKTT. 

which responsible office he now holds. Mr. 
Crockett is a member of the Commercial- 
Athletic Club, and a member of the Committee 
on House and Grounds, and also of the "Delta 
Tau Delta" and "Phi Beta Kappa" College fra- 
ternities. He is a member of the First Pres- 
byterian Church. 



w. o. DAVIES. 

Davies, vice-president and H. Davies, secretary. 
Business was commenced in a comparatively 
modest manner at No. 110 East Washington 
street, but the business energy of the managers 
oi the company and the excellence of its 
products soon commanded a large and compre- 
hensive trade, and a larger building and 
greater facilities soon became an absolute ne- 
cessity. To meet this the company has removed 
to the commodious brick building at Nos. 117- 
119 South Lafayette street, formerly known as 
the Curry Comb factory, and here the company 
occupies the entire upper floor comprising an 
area of 40x155 feet. The factory is equipped 
with modern machinery and every appliance 
for the shirt manufacturing business known 10 
modern skill and invention. The company 
employs only the most skilled designers and 
cutters and their large force of employes are 
experienced in the various branches of the 
work. The products of the Davies Shirt fac- 
tory have no superiors in the country, and the 
name of "Davies" has become recognized 
guaranty in the trade for excellence both in 
style, fit, material and workmanship. All the 
leading styles of fine white and fancy shirts 
for dress and ordinary wear, Pajamas and 



SOUTH BEND 



281 



night robes are produced by this establishment, 
and the business is constantly increasing. In 
connection with this factory the company also 
conducts a modern first-class laundry which 
was established by Mr. W. O. Davies in 189?, 
and which is located at the foot of Washington 
street. Here the highest class of skilled laundry 
work for the shirt company, leading hotels, 
private families and individuals is always 
assured, and the business has grown to large 
proportions since its first inception. Mr. Wil- 
liam O. Davies, the president of the company, 
is a native of Portage City, Wis., and was 
born in 1S57. He was connected with the 
Wilson Bros, for twenty-four years and estab- 
lished their mammoth factory in this city in 
1884. He was the manager of the factory for a 
number of years, but resigned in 1895 to engage 
in business for himself. He is well known in 
the community and is tne treasurer of the 
Board of Education of this city. He is also the 
controlling head of the Davies Laundry Com- 
pany of Chicago, located at 427-429 Dearborn 
street, which is the largest hand laundry in the 
United States. 



WILLIAM H. LONTZ. 
Mr. William H. Lontz, senior member of the 
firm of Lontz Bros., dealers in building material, 
coal and wood, No. 602 South Michigan street, 




WILLIAM H. LONTZ. 

was born in Sodom. Ohio, near the City of 
Akron, in 1857. He is a son of Jonas Lontz, i 
successful merchant miller, and Hannah (Heck) 



Lontz. When but four years of age his par- 
ents removed to this city where his father en- 
gaged in the merchant milling business for 
many years. Young Lontz was educated in 
the public schools of South Bend and the high 
school, and when he had completed his educa- 
tion engaged successfully in the dairy business 
which he conducted until 1887, when with his 
brother, Charles S. Lontz, he established the 
present business. Mr. Lontz is a business man 
of judgment and high standing and is widely 
known. He was married in 1889 to Miss Julia 
Maurer of Mishawaka, and has two children, 
a boy and a girl, and resides at No. 620 South 
Carroll street. 



CHARLES S. LONTZ. 
Mr. Charles S. Lontz, one of South Bend's 
prominent and successful business men, and a 




CI1ARLES S. LONTZ. 

member of the firm of Lontz Bros., dealers in 
building materials, coal, wood, etc., at No. 602 
South Michigan street, was born in the Stat.? 
of Ohio, at Sodom, near Akron, November 21, 
1859. He is the son of Jonas Lontz, who was 
for many years engaged in the milling business 
here, and of Hannah (Heck) Lontz. When a 
child two years of age his parents removed from 
the Buckeye State to South Bend, and it was 
here in the public and the High School that 
young Lontz received his education. When he 
had completed his studies he followed the foot- 
steps of his father and learned the milling 
trade and continued in this line until 1887, 



SOU.TH B.E N D 



when with his brother, William H. Lontz, he 
established the firm of Lontz Bros., where he 
has since been actively engaged. Mr. Lontz is 
a careful business man and highly esteemed in 
commercial circles. He was married February 
12. 1885, to Miss Emma Laidlaw of Mishawaka. 



JOSEPH M. ROGERS, Jr. 
Mr. Joseph Martin Rogers, Jr., President of 
The Western Grocery Company, located at No. 
120 South Michigan street, is a young business 




JOSEPH M. ROGERS. .IK. 

man of ability, who has brought modern 
methods to bear in the large enterprise of which 
he is the head. Mr. Rogers is a native of the 
Blue Grass State, and was born at Bryant Sta- 
tion, near Lexington, Ky.. July 27, 1871. His 
father is Joseph M. Rogers, who was for twenty 
years Western Manager of the Queen Insurance 
Company of America, and his mother, Kate 
(Gamble) Rogers. When but a child his par- 
ents removed to Chicago, where the boy was 
reared and educated. He attended the public 
schools and completed his education at the 
Northwestern University, and at Lake Forest, 
and then started out in the insurance business 
where he remained four years, when he became 
a member of the firm of B. B. Dow & Co., gen- 
eral merchants and bankers, who own and 
conduct mercantile establishments in various 
parts of the state of Ilinois. In 1900 Mr. Rogers 
came to South Bend and organized The Rogers 
Company. In July, 1900, The Western Grocery 



Company was organized and incorporated as a 
successor to The Rogers Company, with Joseph 
M. Rogers, Jr., President, and John A. Grier. 
Secretary and Treasurer. The company has 
the finest and most completely equipped fancy 
grocery in the city and does an enormous busi- 
ness, its customers being among the leading 
families and hotels of the city. Mr. Rogers is 
a young business man with the kind of ability 
and push that makes for success, and the enter- 
prise, of which he is the head, is a valuable 
acquisition to our commercial life. Mr. Rogers 
was married in 1898 to Miss Lillian McGraw. 
of Rochester, N. Y., and resides at No. 927 
East Washington street. 



JOHN ALLAN GRIER. 
Mr. John Allan Grier, secretary and treasurer 
of The Western Grocery Company, is a 
young business man who brings large practical 
experience to bear, in the enterprise with which 
he is connected. The Western Grocery Com- 
pany stands in the front rank and is a leader 
in the retail fancy and staple grocery trade of 
the city, and under the energetic management 
of its officers is constantly growing. Mr. Grier 
is a native of the Hawkeye State, and was born 
at Davenport. Iowa, February 17, 1874. His 
father, John A. Grier, was for many years 




JOHN' ALLAN <;IUER. 

General Freight Agent of the Michigan Central 
Railroad, and afterwards the General Managei 
of the West Shore and Hoosac Tunnel lines. 



SOUTH BEND. 



283 



His grandfathers were the Rev. John Grier, for 
forty years rector of St. Thomas Church, Belle- 
ville, Ontario, and the Rev. E. W. Hager, D. D., 
Chaplain in the United States Navy. When but 
an infant his parents removed to Chicago, and 
here he was educated and reared. He attended 
the public schools, the West Division High 
School, and the Hyde Park High School. When 
he finished his education he entered the whole- 
sale grocery house of Franklin MacVeagh & 
Co., where he learned every detail of the 
grocery business, and where he remained six 
years. In 1900 he came to South Bend, and was 
one of the incorporators of The Western Grocery 
Company, and is secretary and treasurer of 
the Company. Mr. Grier is a young man of 
ability and highly esteemed by all who know 
him. He is unmarried and popular in social 
circles, and a member of the Indiana Club and 
the Kenwood Country Club of Chicago. 



a journeyman in the International Association 
of Machinists. He then began studying law 
in the office of his brother, John W. Talbot, 
and entered the College of Notre Dame and 
graduated from that institution in 1896. The 
same year he was admitted to the oar and since 
that time has been associated with his brother 
in the conduct of their extensive and lucrative 
practice. Mr. Talbot is unmarried and is 
prominent in the social circles of his native 
city. He is an able and painstaking practi- 
tioner and possesses all the essentials for a 
successful and prosperous legal career. 



ED. P. CARSON. 

Ed. F. Carson, manufacturer of the delightful 
game of Crolard, whose office is located at No. 
217 West Jefferson street, is a native of Illinois, 
and was born in Henry County, October 3. 1871. 



JOSEPH E. TALBOT. 

Mr. Joseph E. Talbot, of ihe law firm of 
Talbot & Talbot, is a rising young attorney of 
ability and energy. He was born November 
26, 1873, in South Bend, and his father, Peter 
Talbot, was engaged at Notre Dame college. 






* 





JOSEPH E. TALBOT. 

He was educated in the catholic schools of 
South Bend and Notre Dame University and at 
sixteen years of age graduated in a commer- 
cial course. He then became an apprentice 
machinist and remained at this uniil he became 



ED. p. CAHSON. 

His father, Wilson Carson, was a farmer and is 
still living. When five years of age Mr. Car- 
son's parents removed to Iowa and for several 
years were located in Page and Fremont 
Counties. They then removed to Pleasanton, 
Lynn County, Kansas, where young Carson 
attended the public and high schools. From 
1891 to 1896 he was engaged in the furniture 
and house furnishing business on his own 
account, and during that time he invented and 
perfected the "Crolard" game, with which he 
has been iuentified for the past three years. 
Mr. Carson sold out his business in Kansas and 



284 



SOUTH BEND. 



devoted himself to the successful introduction 
of "Crolarrt," and to-day this pleasing combi- 
nation game is sold in every part of the country 
and in Canada and Mexico. He removed to 
South Bend in August, 1S99, and since that time 
has been in successful business here. He 
deals exclusively with the wholesale trade and 
transacts a large mail order business. Mr. 
Carson is an active and energetic business 
man and attends to every detail of his large 
trade. He has won success by his own efforts 
and has contributed to the amusement of all 
communities. He is popular in social circles 
and is fraternally asociated with the Masons 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



Dr. 



DR. A. G. MILLER. 
Allen G. Miller has been a successful 



practitioner of Medicine and Surgery in this 
city for the past twenty-two years and is well 




V 



DR. A. Q. MILLER. 

known in the community. He was born in 
Berlin, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, in 1S35, 
and commenced the study of medicine and 
surgery early in life, in Baltimore, Md. After- 
ward he attended the Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, at Philadelphia, where he took special 
courses under such noted surgeons and special- 
ists as Professors Gross, Pancoast, Meigs, Lud- 
low, Agnew and others. He then returned to 
his native county and successfully practiced his 
profession for over twenty years. He then 
came to South Bend and has been in active 



practice since his location here. He is inter- 
ested in the extension of the city and suburbs 
and he is the owner of several additions to the 
city, including over four hundred lots, and 
several farms and gardens, and also owns an 
extensive fruit farm containing about 16,000 
trees. Dr. Miller is the proprietor of the Neuro- 
pathic Remedies, and makes a specialty of all 
chronic and nervous diseases. His ofhce and 
laboratory is located at Nos. 225 and 227 South 
Michigan street, and his remedies have attained 
a wide reputation throughout the country. 



DR. ROBERT H. CALVERT. 

Dr. Robert H. Calvert was born in Delphi. 
Ind., November 2, 184S, the son of Preston 
Calvert and Minerva (.Connolly) Calveru He 
was educated in the public and high schools 
and later attended Notre Dame. He lived at 
Delphi until he was thirty years of age. He 
received his professional education at the Lini- 
versity of Michigan, finishing his medical 
education at the Ohio Medical College at Cin- 
cinnati, where he graduated in 1869. He re- 
turned to Delohi where he practiced his pro- 
fession ten years, when he was appointed as 
physician and surgeon at the Indiana State 
Prison at Michigan City. Dr. Calvert remained 
as prison physician for thirteen years, during 
the regimes of Wardens Murdoch and French. 
In 1895 he came to South Bend where he has 
built up a large and lucrative practice. He is 
a member of the Indiana State Medical Society, 
and a gentleman of rare attainments in his 
profession. 



WILLIAM TOEPP. 

Among the successful merchants of this city 
must be mentioned the name of Mr. William 
Toepp, who for the past twelve years has been 
engaed in the wholesale wine and liquor busi- 
ness at the southeast corner of Main street and 
Colfax avenue. Mr. Toepp is a native of New 
York and was born at Rome, Oneida County, 
April 14, 1851. His father, Peter Toepp, was 
a prominent dry goods merchant, and later 
engaged in the coal and wood business in this 
city. Mr. Toepp attended the public and 
parochial schools of his native city and was 
later engaged with his father in the dry goods 
business in Rome, under the firm name of P. 
Toepp & Sons. In 1880 the family removed to 
South Bend and the father and two sons, Wil- 
liam and P. H. Toepp were engaged in the dry 
goods business as P. Toepp & Sons. Their store 
was located in the Washington Block on 
Washington street, and they were burned out 



SOUTH BEND 



285 



on July 28, 1881. Mr. Toepp and his brother 
then opened a general store on Cnapin street 
as Toepp Bros., and in 1885 they engaged in 
the shoe business, at which Mr. Toepp con- 
tinued until 1887. when the firm went out of 




prominent citizen there. His early education 
was acquired in the village schools, afterward 
attending the High school at Waterloo, Iowa. 
He then took a full course in architecture at 
Cornell University, and graduated with a de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in 1S86. He went 
to New York City where he entered the office 
of the well known firm of LeBrun & Sons, and 
after remaining there one year he was engaged 
by John Dufais, secretary of the Tiffany Glass 
& Decorating Company. Here he remained 
four years and was regarded as one of the 
leading young artists in that famous establish- 
ment. In 1S92 he came to South Bend with 
Wilson B. Parker, and formed the partnership 
known as Parker & Austin, which has been 
successful in this section, and has won a justly 
earned reputation. Mr. Austin is an architect 
of high ideals and of a progressive nature, and 
withal an artist of rare taste and ability. He 
has recently been appointed by Secretary of 
War Elihu Root, superintendent and engineer 
in charge of the construction of the new Jeffer- 
son Barracks at St. Louis, Mo., where is located 
the Headquarters of the Department of the 
Missouri. Mr. Austin was elected a member of 
the American Institute of Architects in 1896. 



WILLIAM TOEPP. 

business. In 1888 he established his present 
business and has been successful in building up 
a large trade, and in maintaining a high reputa- 
tion. He carries an extensive stock of fine 
liquors, wines and cordials, and is also an im- 
porter of foreign wines and liquors. He deals 
exclusively with the trade and his goods are 
sold throughout the city and the surrounding 
country. Mr. Toepp is a practical and pro- 
gressive business man and is highly esteemed 
in the community. He is a member of the B. 
P. O. E„ the Turn-Verein, and the South Bend 
Maennerchor. He was married in 1S81 to Miss 
Linda Elbel, a daughter of Mr. John M. Elbel. 
of this city, and with his estimable wife re- 
sides at No. 841 West Water street. 




ENNIS R. AUSTIN. 

Mr. Ennis R. Austin, who is connected with 
tne prominent firm of Parker & Austin, archi- 
tects of this city, is one of the most artistic 
members of his profession in the west. He was 
born at Owasco, N. Y.. August 30. 1863. His 
father, John R. Austin, is still living and is a 



ENNIS R. AUSTIN. 

He is well known in this city and is a member 
of the Indiana and the Commercial-Athletic 
Clubs. He was married to Miss Elsie E. Wood- 
worth, of Seneca Palls, N. Y., and lives at No. 
348 Colfax avenue. 



286 



SOUTH BEND. 



DR. HENRT E. VITOU. 

Dr. Henry Edmund Vitou, the well known 
physician of the Electric School of Medicine, is 
a native of Elford, County Essex, a suburb of 
London, England, and was horn July 30, I860. 
He is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Woell) 
Vitou. His father, who is now living in Akron, 
Ohio, was a prosperous victualler in London, 
and was the first merchant who sold American 
dressed beef in that city. When he was six 
years of age Dr. Vitou's parents removed to 
Akron, 0., where he attended the public 
schools and took a practical course in Hammil's 
Akron Business College. In 1892 he attended 




DH. HENRY E. VITOU. 

the Electric Medical College, in Cincinnati, O., 
and graduated with a degree of Bachelor of 
Medicine in 1895. He then located in Cleve- 
land, O., and after practicing one year in that 
city he came to South Bend, where he has 
since been in successful practice. Dr. Vitou is 
a genial gentleman of culture and refinement 
and thoroughly versed in the ethics and 
methods of his branch of medical practice. He 
was married in 1895 to Miss Mary Tarbell, of 
Summit County, Ohio, and resides at No. 748 
South Michigan street. 



WALTER P. GISH. 
Mr. Walter Poster Gish, secretary and treas- 
urer of the Trojan Manufacturing Company, is 
a young man of ability who has built up an 
extensive practice and successful enterprise. 



Mr. Gish was born in this city February 3, 1878. 
He is the son of William D. Gish, for many 
years a leading and successful liveryman here, 
and his mother is Margie M. (Foster) Gish. 
Mr. Gish was reared in this city and received 
his education in the public and High Schools 
here and took a course in the Chicago 
Athenaeum, graduating from that institution in 
1S97. He returned to South Bend and became 
secretary and treasurer and manager of the 
Trojan Manufacturing Company, which position 
he fills with credit. The company has its office 
and factory at No. 226 South Michigan street, 
where it manufactures the celebrated adjustable 
shade brackets, for hanging window shades to 
any and all widths of windows, also shade 
exhibitors for stores, adjustable screens for 
windows and doors, and the new patent necktie 
clip, which fastens the necktie to the shirt 
without tearing or damaging either. The com- 
pany manufactures for the wholesale, jobbing 
and retail trade. Its business extends to all 
parts of the United States and Canada. Mr. 
Gish is a young man of high social standing 
who is well known and popular in every walk 
of life. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, and resides at No. 333 West Colfax 
avenue. 



REV. V. CZYZEWSKI, C. S. C. 

The Rev. Valentine Czyzewski, pastor of St. 
Hedwige's church and parish, is the spiritual 
leader of the Polish people of South Bend. His 
pastorate of St. Hedwige's commenced prac- 
tically in 1877, when the church was located on 
Monroe street and was known as St. Joseph's. 
This edifice was blown down in 1879, and the 
new church was erected in 1883 on Scott street 
near Division street, and dedicated as St. 
Hedwige's on April 15. 18S4. Originally the 
congregation embraced but 125 families, but 
under his able leadership it increased to 1,200 
families, which becoming too large, led to the 
erection of St. Casimir's church and St. Stan- 
islaus, B. M. The present church is a beautiful 
and imposing structure and its handsome main 
altar was the gift of the St. Hedwige's society, 
while the two side altars and the bell were 
presented by the St. Stanislaus society, and 
the organ was one given by St. Casimir's 
society of this city. In addition to the church 
there is an extensive school on the grounds, 
which is a model building of its kind. The 
school house was originally erected in 1886 but 
was destroyed by fire in 1896, and replaced by 
the present handsome building. The school 
has enrolled nearly 1,000 scholars under the 
charge of an able corps of teachers, and the 



SOUTH BEND 



287 



religious and educational development of the 
scholars is largely due to Father Czyzewski, 
and his clerical assistants. Father Czyzewski 
is a native of Russian Poland and was born 
February 14, 1846. He studied in the monas- 
teries of his native land until they were 
abolished by the stern edict of the Russian 
Government. He came to America in 1869 and 
became a student at Notre Dame University in 
1872. He is a member of the order of the Holy 
Cross, and was ordained to the priesthood in 
1876, since which time he has been active in 
caring for the spiritual and material welfare of 
the Polish inhabitants of this city. He has 
also been instrumental in the building of St. 
Stanislaus, Kostka, church at Terre Coupee 
prairie, and of St. John Kantius church near 
Rolling Prairie. Father Czyzewski is an earn- 
est and progressive exponent of the faith he 
professes and his beneficial influence among 
the Polish people of this city is warmly appre- 
ciated by the church and his congregation. 



R. T. BERLIN. 



Among the successful business men of the 
west end is Mr. R. T. Berlin, the well known 
grocer and dealer in hay, straw, feed, wood, 
etc., at Nos. 1129-1131 West Wasnington street. 







*c 



R. T. BERLIN. 

Mr. Berlin is a native of the Buckeye state and 
was born in Starke County, Ohio, seven miles 
from the City of Canton, October 1, 1844, and 
comes of a family prominent in that section. 



Mr. Berlin came to South Bend in 1865 and is 
a pioneer in the grocery business here. In 1S84 
he bought the property where he is now located 
and started in his present business. He has a 
nice store and a feed warehouse with large 
yards in connection and does a prosperous busi- 
ness. He carries a well selected stock and his 
trade is among the families of that section. 
Mr. Berlin was married to Miss Mary Herring 
and resides at No. 1129 West Washington street. 



DR. ALBERT E. BARBER. 

Dr. Albert E. Barber, a successful practitioner 

in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, was 

born near Brockville, Ontario, in December, 

1868. His father, Charles E. Barber, was a 




DR. ALBERT E. BARBER. 

farmer, and the son had the advantages of a 
good education. He attended the high schools 
at Brockville and Athens, and after his gradua- 
tion he taught in the schools of that vicinity. 
Passing the matriculent examination for Queens 
University at Kingston, he took a course in the 
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, con- 
nected with that institution, and graduated in 
1892 with the degrees of M. D. and C. M. He 
made a special study of the diseases which he 
now so carefully and intelligently treats. He 
located in Misnawaka and was associated with 
Dr. J. B. Green, and remained there about six 
years, during which time he attended the post 
graduate class of the Polyclinic of Chicago, in 
a special course on the eye, ear, nose and 



288 



SOUTH BEND. 



throat. In 1S9S Dr. Barber came to South Bend 
and ranks deservedly high in his profession. 
He is the expert examiner of the United States 
on all pension applicants from this section. He 
is a member of the Indiana State and St. Joseph 
Councy Medical Societies and is fraternally 
connected with the Masons and K. 0. T. M., 
and is a member of the Twentieth Century 
Club of Mishawaka. In 1S95 he was married 
to Miss Grace M. Green of Mishawaka, and he 
resides in a pretty home at No. 627 Vistula 
avenue. 



and here Mr. Gibson shows a complete line of 
all kinds of latest picture frames and mould- 
ings. He makes a specialty of framing fine 
pictures for parlors and other rooms and does 
the highest class of work at reasonable rates. 



ARTHUR G. KELTNER. 

Mr. Arthur G. Keltner has been prominently 
identified with the commercial community of 
South Bend for eighteen years and is one of the 



S. T. GIBSON. 
Mr. S. T. Gibson, the well known and old es- 
tablished manufacturer of picture frames at 
No. 117 East Jefferson street, was born in Moul- 
ton County, Pa., February 11. 1843. His father 
is Joseph Gibson and his mother Julian (With- 
ington) Gibson. Young Gibson was educated 
in the schools near his home and when he had 
finished his education he learned the carpenter's 
trade and later the cabinet maker's trade. In 
1868 Mr. Gibson went to Constantine, Mich., 
where he worked at the cabinet making trade 
three years, and then went to Grand Rapids. 
He then came to South Bend where he has since 




S. T. GIBSON. 

resided. Mr. Gibson worked at his trade until 
about fifteen years ago, when he started in the 
manufacture of picture frames, in which he has 
been most successful. His store and shop at 
No. 117 East Jefferson street is nicely fitted. 




ARTHUR fi. KELTNER. 

leading hardware merchants of this city. He 
is a native of St. Joseph County and was born 
May 14, 1861. His father, Josiah G. Keltner, 
is well known in this community. Mr. 
Keltner was educated in the public schools of 
this city, and is a graduate of the South Bend 
High School. He also attended Franklin Col- 
lege, at Franklin, Ind., and after leaving school 
engaged in the hardware business. For thir- 
teen years he was a member of the firm of 
Monroe & Keltner, but afterward established a 
business on his own account, in which he has 
been most successful. Mr. Keltner's extensive 
store and workshop is located at No. 129 North 
Main street, and his stock embraces a large line 
of stoves, ranges and furnaces of a superior 
quality, and everything in tinware and general 
hardware known to the trade. He also makes a 
specialty of artistic mantle work, tiling, and 
tile floors for whieti he has gained a high 
reputation. Mr. Keltner is a practical business 



SOUTH BEND 



2S9 



man in the highest sense and gives his per- 
sonal attention to every detail ot his business. 
He is conscientious and progressive and his 
trade extends throughout the city and the sur- 
rounding country. He was married to Miss 
Anna Smith, ot LaPeer, Mich., and resides at 
No. 827 Park avenue. 



DR. WILLIAM GODFREY WEGNER. 
Among the rising young physicians of South 
Bend, Dr. William Godfrey Wegner is deserving 
of honorable mention. He was born in Jeffer- 
son, Wis., December 16, 1872, and his father 
William Wegner, is a veteran of the civil war. 
The family removed to South Bend in 1882, and 
the young man received his early education hi 
the schools oE this city. He was at one time 
a clerk in the dry goods store of George Wyman 
& Co., and was engaged in many capacities 
while with that Arm, which gave him a varied 
business experience. He also attended the 
Commercial College here. Aspiring to the 
practice of medicine he studied during his vaca- 
tions in the offices of Dr. Mitchell, Dr. Stoltz 
and Dr. Berteling. He also attended Queen's 
University at Kingston. Ont., for two years, 
where he was awarded honors. He afterwards 
took a course in the College of Physicians ani 
Surgeons at Chicago, the Medical Department 




DR. WILLIAM GODFREY WEGNER. 

of the University of Illinois, and graduated with 
honor in 1898. He was a member of the first 
four year class to receive a medical diploma 



issued "by the State of Illinois to a co-educa- 
tional class of students. He came to this city 
and began his practice. He is medical examiner 
of the Home Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and is a memoer of the American Medical 
Association and the Indiana State and St. 
Joseph County Medical Societies, being vice- 
president of the latter. He is also connected 
with the medical and surgical staff of the 
Epworth Hospital. His office is at the corner 
of Michigan and Jefferson streets. 



ROBERT C. RUSSELL. 
Mr. Robert C. Russell, the senior member of 
the widely known Arm of Russell & Nelson, 




ROBERT C. RUSSELL. 

manufacturers of Mattresses and pillows, whose 
factory is located at the foot of East Washing- 
ton street on the west race, is a native of 
Armadale, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, where he 
was born May 14, 1865. He is a son of Robert 
Russell, and Janet (Allison) Russell. Until he 
was fourteen years of age he resided in the 
town of his nativity and there attended the 
schools and obtained a good education. He 
served four years as an apprentice in the dry 
goods business, and in 1881 he went to Dumbar- 
ton, Scotland, where he clerked in a dry goods 
store, two years when he went to Hamilton and 
continued in the same line. In 1884 he came 
to America and went to Elmira. N. Y., where 
he was engaged in the dry goods business until 
1892, when he came to South Bend and was 



10 



290 



SOUTH BEND. 



employed in Ellsworth's dry goods store until 
189S. While employed there, in 1894, he with 
Mr. August Nelson, established the firm of Rus- 
sell & Nelson and began the manufacture of 
mattresses, and the business has rapidly grown. 
In 1S9S. Mr. Russell resigned his position in the 
store to devote his entire time to his manufac- 
turing enterprise. The plant is a large and 
modern one, the output being 25.000 mattresses 
per year. The firm manufactures high and 
medium grades of excelsior, shoddy, and 
cotton, and feather pillows, its trade extending 
to all parts of the country. Mr. Russell has 
been twice married. In 1S86 he was married to 
Miss Maggie Ferguson who died in 1889. In 
1S91 he married Miss Grace Staples, of this 
city, and resides in a handsome new home at 
No. 1606 South Michigan street. 



W. M. WALTER. 

Mr. Willard M. Walter, who one year ago 

i stablished himself in the wholesale dry goods 

and notion business in this city, is a type of an 

entergetic self-made man. Mr. Walter was 



Edwardsburg, Mich., where he began his actual 
business life as a clerk in a store. Always 
being ambitious to embark in business for 
himself, the opportunity came in 1875, and Mr. 
Water opened a general store at Edwardsburg 
which he still conducts. In 1894 he opened a 
retail store at C'assopolis, Mich., which he 
sold in 1899. and came to South Bend, and 
started in the wholesale business. Gradually 
he pushed himself to the front and his store at 
No. 324 South Michigan street has since been 
enlarged to double its original capacity. Mr. 
Walter represents some of the leading manu- 
facturers of the country and is a wholesale 
merchant and jobber in dry goods, notions, 
hosiery, suspenders, ladies' skirts, handker- 
chiefs, pipes, confectionery, etc. His trade ex- 
tends over a radius of about 100 miles from 
South Bend and requires the constant services 
of three traveling men. His two sons Charles 
B., and F. G. Walter, are assisting him in the 
store. Mr. Walter is a careful business man 
of high standing. He was married in 1878 to 
Miss Ella Lutes, an estimable Michigan lady, 
and resides at No. 610 South Main street. 




W. M. WALTER. 

born in Center County, Pennsylvania, July 31, 
1S54. His parents were Jacob and Catherine 
Walter, and his family was highly esteemed in 
that section. When he was fifteen years of age 
his parents removed to Cass County, Michigan. 
Young Walter attended the district schools and 
the Napierville College, at Napierville, 111., and 
when he had finished his education he went to 



PAUL O. BEYER. 

Mr. Paul O. Beyer, the well known and artis- 
tic florist of this city, has been in successful 
business here for several years. Mr. Beyer 
is a native of Germany, and was born in Ber- 
lin, July 31, 1869. He is the son of August 
Beyer and Louisa (Hagedorn) Beyer, and his 
father was a well known fresco artist both in 
Germany, and the United States. His parents 
came to America in 1870, and after residing 
in Chicago, and Laporte, they came to South 
Bend in 1879, and here the young man attend- 
ed the public schools. His father was en- 
gaged in the decorations on the old Court 
House. St. Mary's Academy, and Notre Dame 
and attained a high reputation as an artist. 
Young Beyer assisted his father in business, 
and being of an athletic build and training he 
was engaged as physical director of the Y. M. 
C. A. for a year, and at the University of Notre 
Dame where he remained seven years. He 
was also the physical director of the Com- 
mercial Athletic Club for four years. Before 
engaging in the floral business in this city he 
thoroughly mastered every detail of the florists 
art at Chicago. He then established himself 
as a florist and floral designer in this city, at 
Michigan and Washington streets, where he 
remained for some time. His present ex- 
tensive establishment is located at No. 115 
East Jefferson street, where he conducts a 
large business in cut flowers, boquets, floral 



SOUTH BEND. 



291 



designs, and seeds and plants 01 all kinds, also 
fancy birds and gold fish. He is also an artist 
in mounting birds and animals, and is thorough- 
ly skilled in the Taxidermist's art. He is a 
floral artist of taste and culture and his 
patrons are among the leading families of the 




church. When eleven years old he located in 
Utica, N. Y., and received his education in the 
public schools of that city, and then graduated 
from the State Normal School at Mansfield, 
Pa. He taught school in New York and Illi- 
nois for about seven years, when he returned 
to Utica and learned the profession of archi- 
tect. In 1889 Mr. Selby was engaged with 
the firm of Burnham & Root, of Chicago. 
While there he drew the specifications for the 
Monadnock, the Great Northern Hotel, the 
Woman's Temple, the Marshall Field Annex, 
and superintended the mechanical work in 
many of the handsomest buildings in that city. 
In 1895 he engaged in business with Mr. Dwight 
Perkins, and built a number of handsome edi- 
fices. In 1898 he came to South Bend to 
supervise the erection of the Court House and 
The Oliver, and has remained here ever since 
that time. He is a thoroughly progressive and 
artistic architect and has built a number of 
fine residences in this city. His latest work 
is the handsome new Dean office building on 
South Lafayette street, which is an imposing 
and beautiful addition to our city, and he also 
superintended the construction of the new 
Sample street bridge. Mr. Selby is master of 
every detail of modern construction and is 



PA 01, O. BEYER. 

city, and his designs for funerals, weddings, 
banquets and all public ceremonies are un- 
surpassed. Mr. Beyer is an active business 
man and has been a member of the Turner's 
since 1S84, and has won a number of valuable 
prizes and medals in gymnasium contests. He 
is also a member of the K. O. T. M. Mr. 
Beyer was married to Miss Pauline Greening, 
also a native of Germany, and with his inter- 
esting family resides at No. 707 Rex street. 



GEORGE W. SELBY. 
Mr. George W. Selby, the well known archi- 
tect, has been located in South Bend since 
March, 1898. He is an artist of recognized 
ability in his profession, and first came to 
South Bend to superintend the erection of the 
new Court House, as the representative of 
Messrs. Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, the archi- 
tects. His valuable work during the construc- 
tion of that edifice was acknowleged by all. 
Later he superintended the building of the 
Oliver hotel. Mr. Selby was born in Meck- 
lenberg, N. Y., near Cornell University, April 
21, 1859. His father was Rev. William James 
Selby, a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal 




GEORGE W. SELBY. 

prompt and conscientious in every undertak- 
ing entrusted to him, and enjoys the confi- 
dence of the community. He was married to 
Miss Luella Holdredge, of Frankfort, N. Y., 
and his residence and studio is located at No. 
112 Garfield court. 



29-2 



SOUTH BEND. 



RALPH H. KUSS. 
Mr. Ralph H. Kuss, the popular druggist who 
conducts a large and successful business at the 
corner of South Michigan and Sample streets, 
was born in Laporte County, November 19, 1S69. 
His father, August Kuss, was a successful 
farmer- in that county, and his mother was 
Caroline (Wiesjahn) Kuss. When a child but 
one year of age his parents removed to this 
city, and here the young man was reared and 
here he has achieved a well earned business 
success. He was educated in the public 
schools of this city and took a thorough busi- 
ness course at the South Bend Commercial 
College. When he had completed his education 
he entered the employ of the Studebaker Bros. 
Manufacturing Company, where he remained 
three years. He then entered the drug store of 
George T. Alexander, where he remained six 
years and thoroughly learned every detail of the 
exacting profession. In 1892 Mr. Kuss estab- 
lished the firm of R. H. Kuss & Co. The store 
is nicely fitted and completely stocked with a 
full line of drugs and chemicals, patent and 
proprietary articles, toilet articles, stationery, 
cigars, etc. Mr. Kuss makes a specialty of 
preparing physicians' prescriptions and difficult 
family formulas. He enjoys the esteem of all 



popularity in the social and fraternal circles jf 
the city and is a member of the Maccabees and 
Knights of Columbia. 



ED. MUESSEL. 
Mr. Ed. Muessel, who is the President of the 
Muessel Brewing Company, is an active busi- 
ness man, and well known in the commercial 
circles of this city. He is a native of South 





RALPH H. KUSS. 

and has a large trade. Mr. Kuss was married 
in 1898 to Miss Otilla Pabst. of this city, and 
with his estimable wife resides at No. 1215 
South Michigan street. He is a young man of 



ED. ML'ESSEI.. 

Bend, and was born January 3, 1857. He is a 
son of Christopher Muessel, the founder of the 
company, who died in this city in 1S94. He is 
a native of Arzberg, Germany, and came to this 
city in 1S52, where he established a brewery 
near the corner of Vistula avenue and St. 
Joseph street, and a portion of the old plant is 
still standing. His mother was Christina 
Muessel. and she was also native of Germany. 
Young Muessel attended the public schools of 
this city, and on the completion of his educa- 
tion entered the employ of his father in the 
brewery and learned every detail of the busi- 
ness. As his father advanced in years Mr. 
Muessel assumed the major portion of the 
management of the brewery and largely directed 
its business. The Muessel Brewing Company 
was incorporated in 1893, with Christopher 
Muessel as president, but at his death in 1891 
Mr. Ed. Muessel assumed the presidency and 
has held it to the present time. In addition to 
his interest in the breweryhe is also extensively 
engaged in the wholesale wine and liquor busi- 
ness. He is an energetic and straightforward 



SOUTH BEND 



293 



business man, and is popular in the community. 
He was married in 1889 to Miss Mary Miller 
and resides au No. 619 Vistula avenue. 



S. S. BNNIS. 
Mr. Safrenus S. Ennis, one of South Bend's 
successful architects, is a native of Center- 
ville, St. Joseph County, Mich., and was born 
November 27, 1847. He is a son of David 
Ennis, a successful contractor and builder, 
and Eliza (Magee) Ennis. As a boy he at- 
tended the public and high schools in his na- 
tive town, and there learned the carpenter's 
trade. For ten yea:s he was engaged in this 
line at Lansing, Mich., and at Marsellus, Mich., 
and for two years was in the grain trade. In 
1883 he went to Danville, 111., and took up 
architecture, which with his expert knowledge 
of building he has made a success. His work 
is highly creditable and his designs show study 
and the best ideas in modern architecture. He 
has erected many fine buildings here among 
them being the residence of Frank Kies, B. 
Sackman. Ralph Smith, Henry Larner, W. D. 
Carpenter, W. A. Macon, Otto Zipperer. and 
others. He also designed the First National 
Bank of Mishawaka, and the residences of 
Messrs. Fuller and Webster, and prepared 



ARTHUR M. RUSSELL. 
Mr. Arthur M. Russell, the well known under- 
taker of South Bend is a native of Michigan and 
was born in Allegan County, February 16, 1873. 
After attending tne public schools in the vicin- 
ity of his home, he came to South Bend on 
January 1, 1893, and was employed as assistant 





s. s. ENNIS. 
plans for school buildings at Danville, Catlin, 
Sidney and Potomac, ill., and Cayuga and 
West Lebanon, Ind. Mr. Ennis was married 
in 1871 to Miss Mary Webster, and resides at 
No. 410 Wood street. 



ARTHUR M. RUSSELL. 

to Mr. D. E. Huntsinger, who was then 
prominently engaged in the undertaking busi- 
ness. On June 1, 1898, Mr. Russell established 
himself in business on his own account, and 
has won a justiy earned success. His hand- 
somely appointed office and warerooms are 
located in the Inwood building, No. 307 South 
Michigan street, and are equipped with every 
modern suggestion for this delicate and im- 
portant business, and for the perfect embalming 
of the bodies placed under his care. He also 
carries, at all times, a complete and extensive 
stock of caskets and funeral supplies. Mr. 
Russell is a dmy licensed embalmer and has 
been granted a diploma by Clark's Schooi of 
Embalming, which is recognized by all the 
health authorities in the state. He has won 
the confidence ana esteem of the community and 
his patrons are among the leading citizens of 
South Bend and vicinity. Mr. Russell's excel- 
lent equipment comprises one of the finest 
casket wagons and lowering devices in the 
west. He is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, the Woodmen of the World, and the 
K. O. T. M., and is also a member of the Com- 
mercial-Atnletic Club. 



294 



SOUTH BEND, 



LOUIS C. KREIDLER. 
Mr. Louis C. Kreidler, the enterprising phar- 
macist at No. 759 South Michigan street, was 
born in Laporte, Indiana, December 4, 1872. 




a son ot Mr. Peter Cimmernian and Mary 
(Shiers) Cimmernian. When he was but a 
child two years of age, his parents removed to 
Logansport, Ind. where his father established 
a successful bakery. Here young Cimmerman 
secured a portion of his education in the public 
and high schools of that city. When he was 
twenty years old his family removed to South 
Bend. Mr. Cimmerman began his business ca- 
reer as a clerk in the drug store of Dr. Rupp, 
where he remained three years and then accept- 
ed a position with Mr. Otto C. Bastian, where 
he remained one year. He next went with the 
firm of Snyder & Buzby where he remained 
seven years, resigning his position in 1893, to 
establish his present successful business. Mr. 
Cimmerman is an expert and gifted pharmacist 
who has won success uy fully deserving it. His 
store is handsomely fitted and has a fine soda 
fountain. He carries a complete stock of pure 
drugs and chemicals, patent and proprietary 
medicines, toilet articles, stationery, cigars, 
and druggists sundries. He makes a specialty 
of filling physicians prescriptions and difficult 
family formulas, and gives skilled and accurate 



LOUIS C. KKElDLEli. 

He is the son of Matthias Kreidler, a successful 
merchant of that city, now deceased, and Cath- 
erine (Miller) Kreidler. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Laporte, and 
graduated from the high school of that city i.i 
1891. He then entered the drug store of F. W. 
Meissner, at Laporte, where he remained over 
two years and acquired a practical knowledge 
of that important business. Mr. Kreidler at- 
tended the Northwestern School of Pharmacy 
in Chicago, from which institution ne graduated 
in 1S95. After a lew months further experience 
in a prominent drug store in Chicago, Mr. 
Kreidler, in 1896, came to South Bend and es- 
tablished himself in his present business. His 
store is well arranged and fully stocked with a 
fine line of goods and he enjoys an excellent re- 
putation, especially among the medical fratern- 
ity who desire care and experience in the com- 
pounding of prescriptions. Mr. Kreidler is un- 
married but is a prime favorite in social circles. 




GEORGE E. CIMMERMAN. 

Mr. George E. Cimmerman, the popular and 
well known druggist at the corner of West 
Washington street and Laporte avenue, was 
born at Camden, Ohio, August 6, 1863. He is West Water street. 



liKdHUE E. CIMMERMAN. 

attention to them. Mr. Citmnerman is popular 
with the trade and is a member of the State 
and St. Joseph County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tions. He was married in 1887 to Miss Ella 
Renner, of Plymouth, and resides at No. 853 



SOUTH BEND. 



295 



CHARLES W. SCOTT. 
Mr. Charles W. Scott, the well known cus- 
tom shirt maker of this city, has been engaged 
in business here for more than twenty years 
and has earned an enviable reputation. He 




Wilhelm is a son of John C. and Emily (de la 
Barrett) Wilhelm, and was born in Starke 
County, Indiana, January 3, 1872, where his 
parents were temporarily located, but who 
shortly afterward removed to Bremen, Mar- 
shall County, Indiana, where Mr. Wilhelm, 
the elder, engaged in the merchant tailoring 
business. Here the son was sent to the public 
schools and received a good education. When 
but fourteen years of age he entered the tailor 
shop of his father and learned the trade, and 
as every care was taken to make him a thor- 
ough and practical workman he mastered every 
detail of the business and became a finished 
cutter. In 1889 ne was engaged as coat maker 
at Horton, Kas., where he remained about one 
year, then returned to his home and entered 
the employ of his father and afterwards be- 
came a partner in the business. Following 
this he graduated from one of the best cutting 
schools in the country and was engaged as a 
cutter in Denver, Col., where he remained 
until the illness of his father made it necessary 
for him to return and assume charge of his 
business. In 1895 he was married at Kenosha, 
Wis., to Miss Ellen J. Pries, of Bremen, and re- 



CHAItLES W. SCOTT. 

is a native of New York state and was born at 
Sidney, December 6, 1840. His fatner, Seth 
Scott, was a successful farmer. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and was atieiward 
in the dry goods and grocery business at 
unadilla, N. Y. He served with distinction 
during the war in Co. G, 1st New York En- 
gineers, which was attached to the Navy De- 
partment. He came to South nend in 1879 
and learned the shirt making business and one 
year later started in business for himself, his 
factory being located at No. 136 North Main 
street. His styles are the latest and his 
materials of the best. Mr. Scott is popular in 
the community and is a member of the Metho- 
dist church and of Auten Post, No. 8, G. A. K. 
His present wife was Miss Sarah Hall of 
Binghamton, N. Y., and he resides at No. 517 
West Wayne street. 



JOHN C. WILHELM, JR. 
The subject of this sketch is more familiarly 
known as Wilhelm the Tailor, although in 
private life everybody knows that John C. 
Wilhelm, Jr., is the fashionable and progressive 
merchant tailor with handsome salesroom and 
workshop at No. 136 South Michigan street. Mr. 




*<r>- 



1 




^Tf^Sf^ 



JOHN C. WILHELM, JK. 

moved to Plymouth, Ind., where he commenced 
business on his own account and remained two 
years. He then came to South Bend and 
opened a store at 122 South Main street. He 
next formed a partnership with M. A. Nemeth 
at r36 South Michigan street, and in October, 
1899, he became sole proprietor and has since 
conducted it. 



296 



SOUTH BEND. 



WILLIAM D. RENNOE. 

Dr. William D. Rennoe, the well known 
pharmacist, whose nicely fitted store is located 
at the corner of Wes. Washington and Walnut 
streets, is a native of this city and was born 




prescription work and does a large business. 
Dr. Rennoe is well known in the social and 
fraternal life here and is a Mason, Royal 
Arcanum, M. C, K. of P., iv. T., and other 
orders. He is also a member of the State ana 
St. Joseph County Pharmaceutical Assooa< 
tions. He was married in 1890 to Miss Matie 
Saloff of Michigan City, and resides at No. 123 
South Wa nut street. 



JOHN W. BOWERS. 

Among the successful contractors and build- 
ers of South Bend is Mr. John W . Bowers, 
whose office is located at No. 107 West Wash- 
ington street. Mr. Bowers was born in Cen- 
ter Township. St. Joseph County. March 5. 
1867. His father, Mr. Henry Bowers, was a 
successful farmer, and his mother was Sarah 
R. (Henson) Bowers. When ne was twelve 
years of age he came to South Bend and at- 
tended the high school. After he had com- 
pleted his education he learned the carpenters 
trade and became an expert in that line, and 
followed the trade in the employ of some of the 
leading contractors of the city. In 1899 Mr. 
Bowers started in the contracting and building 



WILLIAM D. RENNOE. 

in the family residence on Laiayette street 
August 3, 1859. Dr. Rennoe comes oi a family 
Highly esteemed and his father, David Al. Ren- 
noe, who is stiL living in reti.ement here, was 
for several years ..ne efficient city clerk of 
South Bend. His mother was Matilda (Ber- 
tiandj Rennoe. As a boy young Rennoe re- 
ceived a liberal education in tne public schools 
or our city, and completed his education under 
the tutilege of the St. Patrick s Brothers. In 
1881 he went to Foit Wayne, lnd., where he 
took a course in the Fort Wayne Co. lege ot 
Medicine. When he had complete.., nis medi- 
cal studies he decided to travel, and until 1889 
he was engaged in this line, visiting every large 
city in the United States and Canada, and se- 
cured a fund of useful and practical Knowledge 
by observation and experience. He was as- 
sociated with Dr. J. S. Dorward, a leading 
physician and surgeon of South Bend for five 
years. In 1889 he estab ished himself in the 
ietail drug business at No. 123 Soiun Walnut 
street, and built up a large business. in 1895 
he returned to his present store wnich he 
fitted up handsomely and where he carries a 
complete line of drugs, chemicals, and all 
druggist's supplies. He makes a specialty of 




JOHN W. BOWERS. 

business on his own account. He makes a 
specialty of the erection of private residences 
and has buiit a number of handsome structures 
in this city and Mishawaka. Among the fine 
homes that he has built may be mentioned that 



SOUTH BEND 



29? 



of Martin Raunbauhler. on West Marion street, 
Ralph Smith, Heibert Frank on Vistula ave- 
nue, L. Solari, Riverside Park, and Otto Beyer 
on Mishawaka street. He also built the fine 
houses of Messrs. Hertzog and Garvin in 
Mishawaka. He is prominent in business and 
social circies and is a member of St. Joseph 
Lodge. No. 45, A. F. & A. M., and the Modern 
Woodmen. He was married in 1893 to Miss 
Minnie Fox, of Dwight, 111., and resides at No. 
525 West Navar: e street. 



HENRY ECKLER. 
Mr. Henry Eckler, the well known manufac- 
turer of store and office fixtures, was born in 
Sandusky, Ohio, August 19. 1855. and comes of 




llfcMtY fc.CKi.EK. 

a family prominent in that section of the Buck- 
eye state. His father was George Eckler. and 
his mother was Kate (Lippert) Eckler. Young 
Eckler attended the public schools in his native 
city and received a good education. He then 
learned the trade of a carpenter and cabinet 
maker, and also that of making sash, doors, 
blinds, and interior wood work. When ho was 
twenty-four years of age he came to South Benil 
where he was engaged for nine years as fore- 
man for C. Lippert, after which he engaged in 
the contracting and building business. During 
the fourteen years he has been engaged in that 
line, Mr. Eckler has erected many handsome 
residences and buildings in various parts of the 
city, among them being the homes of Henry 



Boys, Charles Coonley, George Feldman and 
others, also the Keen block at Monroe and Col- 
umbia st eets, August Nelson's store on Wil- 
liams street and others. In 1894 Mr. Eck.er 
started in the manufacture of interior wood 
work, bar, office and store fixtures, under the 
style of the Eckler Manufacturing Company, 
which business he successfully conducts. The 
premises is a large and specially appointed 
mill, at the foot of Washington street. All 
modern machinery is used and only skilled 
workmen are employed in the manufacture of 
art work in interior finish, bar, office, bank and 
store fixtures. Special designs and drawings 
are made and submitted. Mr. Eckler has done 
the interior work in many of the fine residences, 
stores and offices here, and he has built up a 
large and permanent trade. He ranks as a 
progressive and energetic business man and is 
highly esteemed. Mr. Eckler was married in 
18S0 to Miss Sophia Wagner of Laporte, and re- 
sides at No. 127 Paris street. 



CORY M. HATFIELD. 

The Hatfield Baking Company, which, by 
producing only the very best that the art of 
the expert baker can devise, has won the high 
reputation it maintains, fairly and honestly. 
The Company's store and bakery at No. 117 




CORY M. HATFIELD. 

North Main street is a model of convenience 
and cleanliness and the bakery is equipped 
with eve.y facility and necessity for the 



298 



SOUTH BEND 



finest bakery products. The company seeks 
the highest plane of excellence and manufac- 
tures the finest of bread, pies, cakes and 
everything, and in prices, maintains its inde- 
pendence. Its patrons are exclusively the 
leading families and hotels of this city and 
vicinity. The company manufactures the 
daintiest of ice creams, ices, sherbets, and 
whipped creams, eclairs, Charlotte Russe, 
cream puffs, etc.. and makes a specialty of 
fine wedding, birthday and party cakes, and its 
artistic and beautiful creations in this line 
have won it a high reputation, and it has 
catered to some of the most notable weddings 
in South Bend, Nnes, Laporte, Elkhart, Lo- 
gansport, Goshen, Buchanan, Cassopolis and 
other cities. Mr. C. M. Hatfield is a native 
of St. Joseph County, and was born on a 
farm near this city February 25, 1861. His 
father was Abel J. Hatneld and his mother 
Martha (Zigler) Hatfield. Until he was ten 
years of age he lived on the farm and at- 
tended the district schools, and then came to 
South Bend and attended the public schools. 
When he had completed his education he 
started in business for himseif. In 1893 he 
established his bakery in South Bend in a 
small way, and the excellence of his products 
soon won him first place. With him in busi- 
ness is associated his brother, Emery Hat- 
field. He was married in 1882 to Miss Daisy 
Payne, a most estimable and cultured lady, 
who has aided largely in the deserved success 
of the business, and resides at No. 313 East 
Wayne street. 



GEORGE W. J. KALCZYNSKI. 

Mr. George W. J. Kalczynski, editor and sole 
proprietor of the Polish Messenger (Goniec 
Polski), is a native of Haverstraw, N. Y., and 
was born January 17, 1S72, the son of George 
W. Kalczynski and Mary (Urbanowska) Kal- 
czynski. When but five years of age his par- 
ents removed to this city and remained here five 
years, the subject of this sketch attending paro- 
chial schools here. He then returned to Yon- 
kers, N. Y., where he attended the public 
schools, and after the death of his mother, he 
returned to South Bend where he learned the 
printer's trade on the South Bend Times. In 
1894 he went to Toledo. Ohio, where he bought 
the Toledo Courier, (Kurjer) which he con- 
ducted for sixteen months, as a weekly, when 
he changed it to a daily paper known as the 
Times, (Czas). After two months he sold out 
and went to Chicago, and then to Bay City, 
Mich., where he was general manager of the 
Truth (Prawda) for five months. He came to 



South Bend, and with Messrs, Durban ana 
Elliott organized the Goniec Polski Publishing 
Company. After five months his partners with- 
drew, since which time Mr. Kalczynski has con- 
ducted the paper alone. The paper, which is 
a semi-weekly, six column folio, and indepen- 
dent in politics, was first issued June 27, 189u, 




GEOKUE W. .1. KALCZYNSKI 

and the press work was done at the office of the 
South Bend Times, until the present plant was 
built in 1899. The paper has a nicely appoint- 
ed office and does all kinds of job printing in 
the English and Polish languages. The first 
office of the paper was a small up stairs room ar. 
No. 411 South Chapin street. Mr. Kalczynski 
is an able writer and a careful business man, 
and his paper is a reflex of current news. He 
is a member of the Polish Turners, M.R.Branca 
of the Polish Turners National Alliance of 
America, and is highly esteemed by all. 



OTTO H. COLLMER. 
Mr. Otto H. Collmer, founder of the business 
and senior member of the widely known manu- 
facturing firm of Collmer Bros., whose office 
and plant is at Nos. 105-109 Vistula avenue, is 
a native of this city, and was born here in 
October, 1S68. Mr. Collmer is a son of George 
Collmer, a shoe dealer here, and of Caroline 
(Fassnachtj Collmer. When a boy he at- 
tended the public schools and high school of 
our city and had the advantages of a good 
education. After he had completed his educa- 



SOUTH BEND. 



299 



tion he entered the employ of the Studebaker 
Bros. Manufacturing Company where he 
learned the trade of a machinist and became an 
expert. In 1S90 he decided to engage in 
business for himself and started in manufac- 
turing high grade bicycles under the style of 
O. H. Collmer. The business grew and in 
1893 he admitted his brother, Frederick G. 
Collmer, to partnership under the present style. 
The firm manufactures the celebrated Collmer 
bicycles, than which there is none better made. 
The firm also deals in a variety of bicycle sup- 
plies. A special branch of manufacture is 
the celebrated Collmer hub, which is used by 
the leading manufacturers in all parts of the 
country. These hubs possess many merits, 
and are strongly made and highly finished. 
The firm also manufactures cutter wheels and 
sprockets. These products are shipped to all 
parts of the United States and exported to 
foreign countries. The firm does a large busi- 



is a native of South Bend, and was born in 
this city, in a house located where his business 
now stands, November 15, 1873. He is a son 
of George Collmer, who was engaged in the 





OTTO_H. COLLMER. 

ness and has branches at No. 105 Beekman 
street, New York City, and at No. 40 Dearborn 
street, Chicago. Mr. Collmer is widely known 
as an energetic and capable business man and 
is highly esteemed. He was married in 1895 
to Miss Ida Sholly of this city. 



FREDERICK G. COLLMER. 
Mr. Frederick G. Collmer, of the widely 
known Aim of Collmer Bros., manufacturers of 
bicycles, etc., at Nos. 105-109 Vistula avenue, 



FREDERICK G. COLLMER. 

shoe business here, and Caroline (Fassnachtj 
Collmer. Young Collmer was educated in the 
public schools here and in the high school, 
and when he had concluded his education he 
learned the trade of a machinist at the Stude- 
baker Bros. Manufacturing Company, where 
he worked until 1893, when he associated him- 
self with his brother, Otto H. Collmer, in the 
manufacture of bicycles, under the present 
style of firm. The line of manufacture in- 
cludes the famous Collmer bicycles, also 
sprockets, patent hubs and cutter wheels. The 
firm employs fifteen skilled workmen and 
ships its products to all parts of the United 
States and to foreign countries, and has branch 
offices at No. 40 Dearborn street, Chicago, and 
No. 105 Beekman street. New York. Mr. 
Collmer is a careful and enterprising business 
man and an expert machinist. He is single 
and highly esteemed and popular in business 
and social circles. 



BERNARD J. ENGELDRUM. 
Mr. Bernard J. Engeldrum, manufacturer of 
fine cigars at No. 134 North Main street, is a 
native of Brooklyn, N. Y. where he was born 
September 7, 1866. He is a son of Jacob Engei- 
drum, and Annie Marie (Reisacher) Engeldrum. 
When a child his parents removed to South 



300 



SOUTH BEND 



Bend, where he was educated in the public 
schools of our city. When he had completed 
his education he entered the employ of the 
South Bend Toy Company. He was next em- 
ployed by the Singer Sewing Machine Company. 
In 1893 he started in the business of manufac- 
turing cigars, and in this line he has been high- 
ly successful and built up a large trade. He 
makes only a high grade of hand made goods, 
and employs a large force of skilled workmen. 
A leading and popular brand of his goods is 
the "Star Banner," a hand made ten cent cigar, 
made of the choicest selected tobacco. He also 
makes the popular "Senator," and "Gilt edge," 
both nickel goods. Mr. Engeldrum makes 
special brands to order for dealers. He is a 
business man of high standing and esteemed 




BERNARD .1. ENGEJLDRUM. 

by all. He was married in 1895 to Miss Lena 
Crepeau, and is prominent in social circles, and 
is a member of the Turners, the Mannerchor, 
and the Elks. 



REV. E. RACZYNSKI. C. S. C. 
The Rev. E. Raczynski. C. S. C, pastor of St. 
Casimir's. one of the leading catholic churches 
of South Bend, is a pastor who has not only en- 
deared himself to his large congregation but 
to the entire community. Father Raczynski 
is a native of Poland and was born in 1868. He 
was educated in his native land and early in 
life evinced a desire to enter the priesthood. 
He finished his classical education abroad and 



in 1887 he came to America. His theosophical 
and theological education was received at Notre 
Dame, and at St. Francis Seminary in Wiscon- 
sin, and at St. Meinrad Seminary in Indiana. 




REV. E. RACZYNSKI, C. S. ('. 

completing them at Notre Dame. On January 
i.. 1^94 he was ordained to the presithood by 
the Rt. Rev. Joseph Radamacher of Fort 
Wayne, Ind. His first appointment was as as- 
sistant at St. Hedwige's church in this city. 
where he remained until July 1895 when he went 
to the Holy Trinity church in Chicago where 
he remained as assistant pastor until July 189S 
He returned to this city and to St. Hedwige's 
where he remained until April 16, 1899 when 
he was appointed pastor of St. Casimir's parish, 
which he has been successful in building up. 
The church is one of the largest in the city and 
the parish house is a commodious brick struc- 
ture. The church is used both for divine wor- 
ship and school purposes. In the school both 
Polish and English are taught. Father Raczyn- 
ski is a most worthy pastor and is filled with ;i 
ambition to promote and advance his people 
and is loved by all who know him. 



THAD. Al. TALCOTT, JR. 

Among the late additions to the bar of St. 
Joseph County is Mr. Thaddeus Mead Talcott, 
Jr., a young attorney of rare mental attain- 
ment whose energy vouchsafes future success 
in his honored profession. Mr. Ta.cott is a 



SOUTH BEND. 



:i01 



native of the Buckeye state and was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, October 18, 1875. When a 
child, three years of age, nis parents removed 
to Chicago, where he was reared. His father. 
Thaddeus M. Talcott. was a wholesale mer- 
chant, and his mother was Nellie S. (Rodney) 
Talcott, and both his parents were natives of 
the Empire state, and their parents of Con- 
necticut. Young Talcott attended the public 
schools at Chicago, and then took a literary 
and law course at the Northwestern Universi- 
ty, where he graduated in 1896 with the law 
degree. He then took a post graduate course 
at Yale College, graduating in 1897 with a 
degree of L. L. M. While at Yale he also did 
literary work. He then returned to Chicago 
where he began the practice of his profession, 
and became a member of the Cook County Bar 
Association. In August, 1900. he came to 
South Bend and opened an office at No. 7 
Oliver Opera House block and began the gen- 
eral practice of law. Mr. Talcott is well- 
grounded in the law and a student who is 



born at Garden Prairie, Boone County. Octo- 
ber 21, 1867. His father was George Davey, 
a foreman in the construction department of 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company, 
and his mother was Lucy (Catchpool) Davey. 
As a boy young Davey was educated in the 
public schoo's at home, and while attending 





THAD. M. TALCOTT .11! 

constantly reading. He is a Mason, a Knight 
Templar and is a member of the Alumni As- 
sociation of the Northwestern University and 
Sons of the American Revolution, and an 
active member of the Commercial Athlenc Club. 



CHARLES A. DAVEY. 
Mr. Charles A. Davey, a prominent attorney 
of South Bend, is a native of Illinois, and was 




.--• 



CHARLES A. DAVEY. 



school devoted himself to mechanics to which 
he inclined. When he left school he en- 
tered the machine shops of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railway Company at Belvidere, 
111., where he learned the details of locomotive 
construction. His ambition next turned to 
locomotive engineering, and oeiore ne was 
twenty-one years of age he ran a locomotive on 
the Northwestern system, where ne remained 
four years, and was the youngest engineer on 
the road. Mr. Davey became the champion 
of organized labor on the division and was con- 
sequently asked to resign his position, which 
he cheerfully did. He then began reviving 
his schoo, work, and entered the law depart- 
ment of the Indiana Normal School at Valpa- 
raiso. Completing his law course he came to 
South Bend in 1897 where he has been an 
earnest worker in his profession since. Mr. 
Davey practices general and patent causes and 
is well grounded in the law. 



302 



SOUTH BEND. 



ISAAC LOWER. 

Mr. Isaac Lower has been identified with the 
painting and decorating business in South 
Bend for the past twenty years, and is recog- 
nized as one ot the most successful members 
of this artistic profession. He is a native of 
Ohio, and was born in Coshocton County. No- 
vember 23, 1S62. His father, Jonas Lower, 
was a successful farmer, who removed to St. 
Joseph County, Ind., in 1863. Mr. Lower re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools 
of this county, and afterwards served an ap- 
prenticeship in the painters trade in which he 
became most proficient. He came to South 
Bend in 1880 and for the past twenty years 
has been in business for himself. In 1890 he 
formed a partnership with Edward Phillips, 
and was located at No. 207 South Michigan 
street. This firm was dissolved in December, 
1900. Mr. Phillips retiring, and the business 
being conducted by Mr. Lower at the old estab- 
lished location. Mr. Lower carries an ex- 
tensive line of fine wall papers and hangings 
of the latest and most artistic designs and a 
full assortment of paints, brushes and painter's 
materals. Among the local buildings that 
bear evidence of the skill and handiwork ot 




ISAAC LOWER. 

Mr. Lower are the Commercial Athletic Club, 
the beautiful Oliver hotel, a number of public 
school buildings, the Mrs. P. E. Studebaker 
residence, the residences of j. M. Studebaker, 
Dr. Rupp, George M. Fountain, and others. Mr. 



Lower is a progressive and artistic decorator 
and a business man of energy. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Julia Donovan, of this city, and 
resides at No. 530 South Michigan street. 



THOMAS WILLIAMS. 
Mr. Thomas Williams is a practical and ex- 
pert plumber and gas fitter and for more than 
twenty years has been engaged in his present 




M 




THOMAS WILLIAMS. 

vocation. He is a native of this city and was 
born April 22, 1S66. His father, Matthew Wil- 
liams, was well known in the community. Mr. 
Williams received his education in the public, 
schools of South Bend and early in life adopted 
the business of plumbing. He received a thor- 
ough and progressive training as a plumber 
and for nearly seventeen years was engaged 
with the firm of Downs & Hoban, which was 
afterwards conducted by Mr. William Downs. 
On March 17, 1896 he commenced business for 
himself, and has achieved a justly earned suc- 
cess. He is located at No. 205 South Michigan 
street, and his extensive stock comprises every 
article known to modern plumbing and ga3 
fitting. He is a thorough master of every detail 
of the business and among his patrons are many 
of the most prominent citizens of South Bend. 
For years he has had the supervision of the 
plumbing and lighting of the buildings con- 
nected with St. Mary's Academy, and the Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame. He is a member of the 
National and State Associations of Master 



SOUTH BEND 



303 



Plumbers and in all important matters connect- 
ed with his profession keeps thoroughly abreast 
of the times. He was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Markland, an eastern lady, and with his family 
resides at No. 110 North Emerick street. 



CARL J. ANDERSON. 

Mr. Carl J. Anderson, the senior member of 
the well known merchant tailoring firm of An- 
derson Bros., more popularly known as "The 
Anderson's," has won a high reputation in his 
particular line of business in this city. Mr. 
Anderson was born in the southern part of 
Sweden, April 24, 1864, and his father, Peter 
Anderson, was a successful farmer in that 
locality. He acquired his education and 
thoroughly learned the tailoring business in 
his native country, and came to America in 
1883. He located in South Bend and for sev- 
eral years was engaged by Moses Livingston 
in the merchant tailoring department, and 
remained there until 1890 when he engaged 
in business for himself. He is a fashionable 
merchant tailor in the highest sense of the 
term, and his customers are among the leading 
residents and business men of this city. He 
carries an extensive line of cloths, cassimers 




CARL J. ANDERSON. 



and trouserings of the latest designs, and his 
styles and patterns are absolutely up-to-date. 
In style, finish and workmanship, his garments 
have no superiors in the city, and they are 



noted for their perfect and graceful propor- 
tions. A few years after commencing busi- 
ness he associated himself with his brother. 
Alfred Anderson, under the firm name of 
Anderson Bros., and their establishment is 
located at No. 119 West Washington street. 
Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Caroline 
Roth, and resides in a pleasant home at No. 
419 West Madison street. 



ALFRED ANDERSON. 

Mr. Alfred Anderson, the junior member ot 
the well known firm of Anderson Bros., mer- 
chant tailors, is an acknowledged artist in his 




ALFRED ANDERSON. 

business, and is a merchant tailor of recog- 
nized taste and ability. Mr. Anderson is a 
native of the southern part of Sweden, and 
was born in 1868. He is a son of Peter Ander- 
son, who was a successful farmer in that 
locality. Young Anderson spent his boyhood 
in his native country where he received his 
education and learned the tailoring business 
in a most thorough manner. He then came to 
America in 1887, and locating in South Bend 
was for a number of years engaged by Moses 
Livingston in the custom department of his 
business. In 1892 he joined his brother, Carl 
J. Anderson, in business, and has materially 
aided in building up the high reputation which 
"The Andersons" have justly acquired in this 
city and the surrounding country. The firm 



304 



SOUTH BEND. 



carries an extensive line of cloths and cassi- 
mers of the latest patterns, and their establish 
ment at No. 119 West Washington street is 
patronized by the leading residents and busi- 
ness men of South Bend. Mr. Anderson is an 
artist in his profession and enjoys the esteem 
of the community. He was married to Miss 
Mabel Robinson, a resident of this city, and 
with his estimable wife and two children 
losides at No. 614 West Colfax avenue. 



A. C. MURDOCK. 

Mr. Arch C. Murdock, one of the leading 
fashionable merchant tailors of this city, is an 
enterprising business man in the highest sens? 




A. C MURDOCK. 

of the term. He was born in Warsaw, Ken- 
tucky, October 9, 1S63, and his father Christoph- 
er Murdock, was well known in that section of 
the state. When a boy his parents removed to 
Rising Sun, Ind., and here the young man re- 
ceived his early education. At the age of eigh- 
teen he adopted the merchant tailoring business 
as a profession and has achieved a deserving 
success. He is a graduate of the John J. Mitch- 
ell School of Cutting in New York, and is one 
of the most expert and artistic designers of 
men's garments in the west. He was engaged 
in business in Indianapolis and New York for 
several years and came to South Bend in 1899. 
His taste was speedily recognized and from the 



outset success was assured. Mr. Murdock's 
establishment is located at 110 West Jefferson 
street, and his stock embraces the most com- 
plete assortment of the latest styles of imported 
and domestic cloths and cassimers to be found 
in any city of the west. His styles and the 
finish of his garments are unsurpassed and he 
is a leader and authority in his line in South 
Bend and is popular in the community. Mr. 
Murdock is a member of the Commercial-Ath- 
letic Club. He was married to Miss Daisy M. 
Hawkins, of Richmond, Ind., and with his wife 
and family resides at 462 Vistula avenue. 



JOHN W. WITTNER. 

Mr. John W. Wittner, manufacturing confec- 
tioner, is a native of the Keystone state, and 
was horn at Buttstown, Pa., April 23. I860. His 
father was David Wittner and his mother was 
Rachel Wittner. When three years of age his 
parents came to South Bend, and here he was 
reared and has since lived. He received his 
education in the public schools, and when he 
was fourteen years of age began driving a gro- 
cery wagon. He was honest and later secured 
a position in a dry goods store where he re- 
mained two years. Mr. Wittner next engaged 
in the milk business and then began the manti- 



m *mi 




JOHN W. WITTNER. 

facture of fine ice cream. In 1S91 he started in 
his present business and three years ago he 
moved to No. 531 South Michigan street, where 



SOUTH BEND. 



305 



he has a large and finely appointed store and 
factory- He maKes all kinds of fine candies, 
and makes a specialty of pure and delicious ice 
cream and ices. Mr. Wittner has ouilt up a 
high reputation for his ice cream and supplies 
the leading families and hotels. He also does 
a large retail trade and has fine ice cream par- 
lors. Mr. Wittner is widely known and highly 
esteemed and was married in 1881 to Miss Car- 
rie A. McCleas. and resides at No. 531 South 
Michigan street. 



WILLIAM H. PARRY. 
Mr. W. H. Parry, widely known in this sec- 
tion as a fresco painter and decorator, whose 
office is located at No. 728 South Michigan 
street, is a native of the Buckeye state and 
was born at Columbus, Ohio, January 20, I860. 
He is a son of David Parry, a well known and 
successful stock dealer in that section. After 
the death of his father he came to South Bend 
with his mother, and here he was reared. He 
received his early education in the public 
schools of this city and then attended the 
Valparaiso Normal School, at Valparaiso. Ind. 
Completing his education he learned the fresco 
and paper hanging trade and became an expert 



and residences in this section. Mr. Parry's 
work is of the high art class and he is widely 
known in this section. He is a bachelor and 
popular in social circles and in fiaternal cir- 
cles and is a member of the B. P. O. E., Turners 
and Modern Woodmen. He resides with his 
mother, Mrs. Mary W. Hill, at No. 728 South 
Michigan street. 



GEORGE WALDSMITH. 
Mr. George Waldsmith, is a native of Indiana, 
and was born on a farm four miles from Lib- 
erty, in Liberty Township. St. Joseph County, 



■' 




^VC/ y 



WILLIAM H. PARRY. 

in that line, and in 1891 started in business 
for himself. He has been most successful 
and has completed many large contracts in 
fresco wo.k, decorating and paper hanging. 
Mr. Parry did the elegant fresco work and 
painting in many public halls, opera houses 




GEORGE WALDSMITH. 

June 11. 1S38. He was a son of Peter Wald- 
smith, a pioneer farmer of this locality and the 
builder and owner of the first saw mill in this 
section of the state. His mother was Susan 
(Gebhart) Waldsmith, and both of his parents 
were natives of Ohio and settled in this county 
in 1S35. Young Waldsmith had few advantages 
for schooling, and when he was but twelve 
years of age he took charge of the saw mill. 
When a boy he hauled lumber to South Bend 
twelve miles distant. In 1869 he was married 
to Miss Maggie Lauer, a native of Ohio, and 
continued living on the farm until 1882, when 
on account of the ill health of his wife he went 
to California and then to Salem, Oregon. At 
the latter place he had charge of a large lumber 
yard for a year and a half. In November 1883 
he returned to South Bend and started in the 
wood and coal business at No. 335-341 South 
Scott street, corner of Division street. The 



20 



306 



SOUTH BEND. 



premises are large and nicely fitted and he 
handles Lehigh and Scranton coal, wood, hay. 
straw, feed, etc., and does a large business. Mr. 
Waldsmith is a business man of strict integrity 
and high standing and is esteemed by all. He 
has two children, a daughter married to F. P. 
Fields of this city, and a son, who is engage.! 
in teaching music. 



GEORGE E. TAYLOR. 

Mr. George E. Taylor, the well known manu- 
facturer of saddlery and harness, and dealer 





GEORGE E. TAYLOR. 

in horse goods, trunks and satchels, has been 
in successful business in this city for the past 
ten years. He was born in Manchester, Eng- 
land, April 11, 1845, and is the son of John S. 
Taylor. In 1851 his father came to America 
and located in Philadelphia where the young 
man received his early education. His father 
was in the United States Navy during the re- 
bellion and was attached to the steamer St. 
Louis, and died during the war. On March 
4, 1857, he left home and entered the home 
and employ of Enoch Hanthoin of Bridgeton. 
N. J., as an indentured apprentice, and here 
also he attended school. He was engaged in 
business for himself in Bridgeton for six years 
and in 1879 he came to South Bend and for 
several years worked for the firm of Heath & 
Steele. In 1891 he established himself in 
business, and his handsome store and manu- 



factory is located at Nos. 232-234 South Michi- 
gan street. Mr. Taylor is an extensive maker 
of high grade harness, for light and heavy 
service, and has won a justly deserved reputa- 
tio for the excellence of his work and the 
style of the goods he produces. In addition 
to this he carries a large line of general har- 
ness and saddlery goods, saddlei y hardware, 
whips, blankets and horse furnishings, and a 
full stock of trunks, satchels and valises of the 
best manufacture. He is a thoroughly prac- 
tical harness maker and understands every de- 
tail of the business. He is widely known and 
highly esteemed in the community. He is a 
member of the Odd Fellows, and the Royal 
Arcanum. Mr. Taylor was married to Miss 
Sarah E. Pogue, of Bridgeton, and ms family 
consists of three children. His son, W. P. 
Taylor, is assistant superintendent of the 
South Bend Woolen Company, and his daugh- 
ter, Mary J. H., is a teacher in the public 
schools. Fanny J., resides with her parents 
at No. 207 South Taylor street. 



FRANK E. MAC DONALD. 

Among the successful and rising young busi- 
ness men of South Bend, one who fully de- 
served the title of "self-made" is Mr. Frank 




FRANK E. MAC DONALD. 



Elmer MacDonald, the popular manager of the 
East Side Lumber Company, whose office and 
yards are located at No. 612 East Jefferson 



SOUTH BEND, 



307 



street. Mr. Mac-Donald is a native of South 
Bend and was born September 28, 1873. Ho 
is a son of Joseph M. MacDonald and Sarah 
(Smith) MacDonald. As a boy he was ed- 
ucated in the public schools of the city, and 
when he had completed his education started 
in the lumber business with the firm of Boyd 
& Henry where he remained three years. He 
started at the bottom of the ladder and learned 
every detail of the business thoroughly. He 
next went with the South Bend Lumber Com- 
pany where he was employed six years, and 
then went with the C. Fassnacht Lumber Com- 
pany. Three years ago he was made manager 
of the East Side Lumber Company, which is a 
branch of the Indiana Lumber Company, the 
largest enterprise in this line here. The East 
Side Lumber Company has an extensive plant 
and handles all kinds, of lumber, lath, shingles, 
etc., and has every facility for promptly filling 
orders. Mr. MacDonald is a young man of 
rare business ability and high standing in the 
community. He is unmarried and popular in 
social circles and is a member of the Odd 
Fellows and the Woodmen of the World. 



HENRY C. WINSLOW. 

Mr. Henry Clay Winslow, manager of the 
Winslow Realty Company, is a native of New 
England and comes of a family most distin- 
guished and honored in Colonial history. He 
was born in Washington County, Maine, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1836, and his father, Jacob Winslow, 
was a yankee sea captain and sailed the At- 
lantic for many years. Mr. Winslow's an- 
cestry in this country dates back to Edward 
Winslow, the first governor of Plymouth Col- 
ony, who came over in the Mayflower. When 
young Winslow was thirteen years old he went 
to sea and filled every position from cook to 
captain and owner of a vessel. He followed 
the sea for ten years, his last experience being 
that of a hurricane off the coast of Cuba, 
where his ship was capsized and sunk. Mr. 
Winslow returned to his native state and en- 
gaged in the mercantile business in Portland, 
as his health was too badly shattered to admit 
of going to sea again. In 1857 he went to New 
Orleans, La., and engaged in business. The 
breaking out of the war found him still in the 
Crescent City with large business interests en- 
deavoring to remain neutral against heavy 
odds. He was finally compelled to give up his 
business and secured permission from Confed- 
erate General Bragg, a warm personal friend, 
to accompany the Army of the Tennessee and 
devote a portion of his time in assisting the 
chief medical director of General Bragg's staff 



in caring for the wounded and suffering upon 
the various fields of battle. He remained 
with the army until after the Battle of Corinth, 
ana during this period he was a participant in 
the invasion of Kentucky and saw the first 
bombardment of Fort Pickens and Pensacola. 
He was at the battles of Shiioh, Pittsburg 
Landing. Stone River and Perryville, and at 
Stone River had his horse shot under him. In 
1864 he decided to leave "Dixie" ana went to 
Bayport, Florida, where he oought the schooner 
"Nancy Jane" for $40,000.00 with the inten- 
tion of running the Federal blockade. He 
loaded his vessel with a cargo of the finest 
Sea Island cotton, then worth $1.00 per pound 
in gold at Havana, and set sail. Near Cedar 
Keys a tender from the gun boat "Fort Henry" 




HENRY C. WINSLOW. 

overhauled the schooner and took boat and 
cargo as a prize. So thorough was the search 
tor valuables that Captain Winslow was com- 
pelled to give up his suspenders into which he 
had sewed $2,000.00 worth of $20.00 gold 
pieces. He escaped with only a draft for 
$1,000.00 which his captors overlooked. Going 
to Havana he secured passage on tne steam- 
snip "Matanzas" bound for New lork. Whwi 
this vessel was within one day of port it col- 
lided with and cut in two the steamer "Locust 
Point" bound for New Orleans and twenty lives 
were lost. Mr. Winslow went to Portland, 
Me., and engaged in business. In 1869 he re- 
moved to Allegan, Mich., and then to Battle 
Creek. He next moved to Grand Rapids, 






SOUTH BEND, 



where he engaged in the insurance and real 
estate business for ten years. When he re- 
turned to Battle Creek, still continuing in that 
business. In 1887 he built the handsome 
'Winslow Block" in that city. In 1900-Tie 
came to South Bend and established the 
Winslow Realty Company. This company 

does a large business in city and farm prop- 
and offers boni fide bargains in productive 
realty, including residence and business prop- 
erty, vacant lots and acreage. The company 
issues a handsome catalogue witn a map of 
South Bend that is sent free upon application. 
Mr. Winslow has had over eighteen years ex- 
perience in this business and is a careful 
business man of strict integrity. 



DR. SARAH F. STOCKWELL. 

Dr. Sarah F. Stockwell is one of the pioneer 
women physicians of the West, and for nearly 
a quarter of a century bas been in successful 



student in the Medical Department of the 
University ot Michigan, and graduated with 
honor in 1^7>;. Afterwards she took a special 
course in surgery and physical diagnosis. She 
commenced the practice of medicine in South 
Bend in 187*;. and with the exception of one 
year spent in Portland. Oregon, has been in 
continuous and successful practice up to the 
present time. Dr. Stockwell is a lady of wide 
experience, and resolute and determined char- 
acter. At the outset of her professional career 
there were but few women engaged in the 
medical profession, and they were compelled 
to encounter and overcome the stern opposi- 
tion both of communities and the practicing 
physicians of the other sex. Dr. Stockwell 
was equal to the emergency and she has won 
tne esteem and regard of the community, and 
of her professional associates. She makes a 
speciality of the diseases of women and chil- 
dren. She is a member of the American 
Medical Association, and the State and St. 
Joseph County Medical societies. Her office 
and residence is at Xo. llt» South Michigan 
street. 




DR. SARAH F. STOCKWELL, 

practice in South Bend and the surrounding 
country. Dr. Stockwell was bo:n in Van 
Buren Township, Lagrange County. Ind. H>-i 
father was James Fowler and her mother Sarah 
iKoheri Fowler, both natives of the Keystone 
state and were married there. As a giil she 
attended the public schools in the vicinity of 
her home and afterward attended the Wolcott- 
vi.le Seminary. She early yielded to the de- 
sire to become a physician, and became a 



ROBERT L. BRAl'NSDORF. 

For more than a quarter of a century Mr. 
Robert L. Braunsdorf has been prominently 
identified with the architectural development 
ot South Bend. Mr. Braunsdorf was Dorn in 
Dantzig. Germany. July 25, 1843. where his 
father, John Braunsdorf, was engaged in the 
shoe business. He was educated at Holz- 
minded, a leading educational institution ot 
Germany, and graduated in 1864. He then 
learned the trade of a carpenter, after which 
he came to America and worked at his trade 
in Xew York City. in 1871 he came to South 
Bend and has been engaged in active business 
since that time. Here he was extensively en- 
gaged in the contracting and building business 
for about ten years when he took up architec- 
ture. He is a gentleman of artistic tastes and 
having a practical knowledge of all details of 
building is qualified for his present profes- 
sion. He has erected a number of nandsome 
buildings in this city, among them being the 
Repository of the Studebaker Brs. Mfg. Com- 
pany at Chicago; the handsome residence ot 
Mr. Clem Studebaker and F. S. Fish, the Mues- 
sel block; the residence of Charles Arthur 
Carlisle, the Infirmary at St. Mary's, and 
many handsome residences in this city and 
Mishawaka. He was mairied to Miss A. \V. 
Mochring in New York and resides at No. 
221 South St. Peter street. 



?::::-: n e :. z 



:;•:■■• 



Mr. Frank S. Winslow. president and man- 
ager of the Wholesale Supply Company, one 
of the largest enterprises in art and portrait 

— ::"-; - :lr : .~:?:' i-i — i: :i .- . - " 
largest art correspondence school in the world. 

i~ i m^:-: .1 :^- ~" ~s' ~ ~ziz^~ :-. .:_. 1' : r_- 
W liXXAM H. WTEXsrsmoi. GS 

Mr. William EL Wansbrough. prudent of th 
Sooth Bend Spring Wagon and Carriage Con 
pany. was born at Alton, Ontario. Canada. Fe 




pany, was born at Grand Rapids, Mich , De- 
cember 12, 1&36. He is a son of Henry C. 
Wins.ow, manager of the Winslow Realty Com- 
pany, and he comes of an illustrious family in 
colonial history, being a descendant of 
ward Winslow. who came over in the May- 
r. :~-r ill ~ i. ; _ : : - - -" r ::' r.;-~— .':. 
Colony. Hi* mother was Rebecca D. How- 
land, and both of bis parents were " 
Z _ :. '■'■":.■ z. i .. . 1".; ;i:-:- :t~:-t! 

to Battle Creek. Mich , and there young V. 
low was educated in the public schools and at 
the Battle Creek College. He erinced a 
decided talent for art and went to Boston 
— 'l-7^ he — i:- ^ ?;- .i: ;::-: :'- ----"::t 
work under able tutors, and then went to 
York, where he demoted much time to 
;::::i_: — :r> ':. 7 ::- -l~:r ~---e *--> '-'-'— 
Italian portrait painter. ToyettL who has 
painted some of the most famous latter day 
portraits in thig and the old country. Toting 
Winslow developed unusual talent and has 
won high praise for his work. In 1SS& he 
came to South Bend, and with his brother R 
R. Winslow. established the Wmslow Engrav- 



HEXRT C. DEXSLOW. 
Henry C. Denslow. formerly s 




HESST C. DKSSUOW. 

-i"l-: ?. -:• .7 1--- '. . " ..7 . 
inner of St. Joseph County, an-1 

.. - '-/.r: A ?-:t7 — 2" 1t-7_:~ 

- - . - 7 7 



310 



SOUTH BEND. 



removed to a farm south of the city where he 
lived until he was fourteen years old, and where 
he attended the district schools. In 18S3 the 
family removed to South Bend, where his par- 
ents died in the winter of 18S4. Young Dens- 
low began practical business life as clerk in a 
fruit stand and grocery store. For seven years 
he was in the store of Baker & Bro., and in 1898 
he started in the grocery business and after a 
short time admitted Mr. Elmer E. Yoder to 
partnership under the style of Denslow & 
Voder. Iu December 1900 Mr. Denslow sold his 
interest to Mr. Yoder and retired from the busi- 
ness. Mr. Denslow is a business man of stand- 
ing and honor. He was married June 15, 1898 
to Miss Amy Mabel Punches, a most estimable 
lady of this County, and resides at No. 310 East 
South street. 



DEWEY C. LAYTON. 
There are many instances, in the com- 
mercial life of the city of South Bend, where 
indomitable pluck and ability have won busi- 
ness success, and a case in point is that of 
Mr. Dewey C. Layton's Dairy, No. 119 East 
Monroe street. This business has grown to 
substantial proportions through the energy- and 
business ability of its proprietor. Mr. Layton, 
though a native of the Hawkeye state, was 
reared and brought up in South Bend. He 
was born at DeWitt. Iowa, in August. 1876. 
and is the son of Mr. John Layton and Mary 




Bend. Young Layton was educated in the 
public schools in this city and at the South 
Bend High School. When he completed his 
education he started in the wholesale and re- 
tail dairy business in this city, where he has 
built up a large and constantly growing trade. 
His dairy is located at No. 119 East Monroe 

'Dntinuous and successful practice up to the 
Jesent time. Dr. Stockwell is a lady of wide 
';perience, and resolute and determined char- 
ter. At the outset of her professional career 
Sere were but few women engaged in the 
edical profession, and they were compelled 
encounter and overcome the stern opposi- 
c m both of communities and the practicing 
lysicians of the other sex. Dr. Stockwell 
as equal to the emergency and she has won 
ae esteem and regard of the community, and 
if her professional associates. She makes a 
peciality of the diseases of women and chil- 
-en. She is a member of the American 
;edical Association, and the State and St. 
Dseph County Medical societies. Her office 
.nd residence is at No. 119 South Michigan 
itreet. 



ROBERT L. BRACNSDORF. 

For more than a quarter of a century Mr. 
Robert L. Braunsdorf has been prominen*'- 
ifientifiert with the ajchite^turri 




DEWEY C. LAYTON. 

I Murdoek) Layton. When a child, but three 
years of age, his parents removed to South 



CHARLES II. LAYTON. 

East Monroe street, is a young business man 
who has won success by fully deserving it. 
Mr. Layton is a native of the Hawkeye state, 
and was born at DeWitt, Iowa, November 24. 
1872. He is a son of John Layton and Mary 
(Murdoek) Layton. When he was six years 
of age his parents came to South Bend, where 
he has since lived. Young Layton lecelved 
his education in the public schools of this 
city, and then attended the South Bena Com- 
mercial College. When he had completed his 
education he went into the dairy business in 
Clay Township, where he remained until he 
entered into his present business with his 



SOUTH BEND 



311 



brother, Mr. Dewey C. Layton. The business 
Is a large and constantly growing one and 
Mr. Layton thoroughly understands its every 
details. He is a young man of ability and 
popular with all who know him, and is single. 



WILLIAM H. WANSBROUGH. 
Mr. William H. Wansbrough, president of the 
South Bend Spring Wagon and Carriage Com- 
pany, was born at Alton, Ontario. Canada, Feb- 




WILLIAM II. WANSBROUGH. 

ruary 14, 1857. His father was the Rev. Rich- 
ard Wansbrough, an eminent Methodist clergy- 
man, and his mother was Rachel (.Orr) Wans- 
brough. When he was twelve years of age his 
parents removed to Dayton, Michigan, where his 
father accepted a pastorate for one year, and 
thence to Elkhart, Indiana, and at the latter 
place young Wansbrough was reared and edu- 
cated. He attended the public schools and when 
he was eighteen years of age came to South 
Bend, and was employed twenty-three years at 
the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Company, fourteen 
years of that time as superintendent of paint- 
ing. He then went to Norwich, Conn., as man- 
ager of the paint department of the Columbus 
Phaeton Company where he remained until 
that corporation went into liquidation. In 189S 
he became a member of the firm of Collmer, 
Woyahn & Wansbrough, which was succeeded 
in August 1900 by the South Bend Spring Wagon 
and Carriage Company, with Mr. Wansbrough 
as president. The office and shops are located 



at Nos. 210-212 St. Joseph street and are large 
and specially equipped for the manufacture of 
spring wagons and carriages. The company 
makes a specialty of the manufacture of rural 
free delivery mail wagons for the Unites States 
Postal Service, and ships its wagons to all parts 
of the United States. These wagons have the 
universal endorsement of Postmasters, Postal 
Inspectors and Carriers and are handsomely 
made and finely finished and are strong and 
durable and specially suited to the exacting 
duties of the service. Mr. Wansbrough is a 
thorough and capable business man and a pub- 
lic spirited citizen, and resides with his estim- 
able wife and four children at No. 219 Vistula 
avenue. 



PAUL WOYAHN. 

Mr. Paul Woyahn, vice-president of the South 
Bend Spring Wagon and Carriage Company, 
an enterprise strictly in the line of modern 
progress, whose office and plant is located at 
No. 210 South St. Joseph street, was born in 
Laporte County, November 18, 1858. His father, 
William Woyahn, was a successful farmer in 
that section, and his mother was Pauline 
(Heintz) Woyahn. Young Woyahn was born 
on a farm and attended the district schools, and 




PAUL WOYAHN 

resided there until 1873, when he came to South 
Bend, and engaged in the employ of the Coquil- 
lard Wagon Works. He is an expert wagon 
builder and knows every detail of the business. 



312 



SOUTH BEND 



In 1883 he went to Chicago where he worked 
at his trade for ten years, and then returned 
to South Bend and was employed by Mr. James 
H. Mason until Oct., 1898, when with Mr. Ed. F. 
Collmer, he organized the firm of Collmer & 
Woyahn, and began the manufacture of wagons, 
general blacksmithing and repairing. In Aug- 
ust 1900 the South Bend Spring Wagon and 
Carriage Company was organized and incorpor- 
ated and Mr. Woyahn became vice-president. 
The company has a fine plant and manufactures 
a high grade of wagons and carriages and does 
general blacksmithing and repairing. A spec- 
ialty of manufacture is rural mail wagons, for 
the rural free delivery service. The company 
makes a fine line of these wagons and ships 
them to all parts of the United States. Mr. 
Woyahn is an expert wagon builder and a busi- 
ness man of high standing. He was married in 
1883 to Miss Louise Momberg, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and with his wife and son, Gordon W. 
Woyahn, lives at No. 325 North dishing street. 



WILLIAM M. PATTERSON. 

Mr. William M. Patterson, whose handsomely 
appointed pharmacy is located at No. 233 
South Michigan street, northeast corner of 




WILLIAM M. PATTERSON. 

Wayne street, is a young business man who 
has brought practical and expert experience 
and ability to bear in the conduct of his busi- 
ness. Mr. Patterson is a native of McLean 



County, Illinois, and was born December 20, 
1874. He is a son of Dr. N. Patterson, a 
widely known practicing physician and drug- 
gist at Mansfield, 111., and of Eliza (Ijams) 
Patterson. He was educated in the public 
schools at home, and then went to the normal 
schools at Bloomington and Mansfield. 111. 
He then decided to engage in professional life 
and took a thorough course at the Northwest- 
ern Co lege of Pharmacy at Chicago, where he 
graduated in 1896. He leturned to Mansfield 
and went into the drug business with his 
father, wheie he remained until 1S99 when, 
with his father, he purchased the present 
business and conducted it until 1900 under the 
style of N. Patterson & Son, when he pur- 
chased his father's interest and has since con- 
ducted it alone. Mr. Patterson is an experc 
chemist and druggist and a business man or 
the highest standing. His store is one of the 
finest in the city and completely stocked, and a 
specialty is made of filling physician's pre- 
scriptions. Mr. Patterson was married March 
29, 1899, to Miss Allie DeGrofft, of Mansfield, 
III., and resides with his estimable wife at No. 
630 South Michigan street. 



M. FRANKLIN FULK. 

Mr. M. Franklin Fulk. proprietor of the 
Standard Electric Company, located at No. 
235 South Michigan street, is a young and en- 
terprising practical electrician who has al- 
ready achieved deserved success in his pro- 
fession. He was born in Decatur, Ind. ; 
August 9, 1875, and his father, Henry A. 
Fulk, was well known as a contractor and 
builder, and Is still living. The family re- 
moved to South Bend in 1880, and Mr. Fulk 
received his education in the public and 
high schools of this city. In connection 
with .Mr. WSlber French, he purchdased the 
Standard Electric Company in 1S97, and a 
year later he bought Mr. French's interest 
and became sole proprietor. He is an ex- 
peit electrician and carries an extensive 
stock of electric supplies and attends to all 
the construction work relative to electric 
lighting and bell systems committed to his 
care. The Nippoid building, the Kiser & 
Woolverton building, the Arnold bui.ding, the 
Polish churcn and school house, and a num- 
ber of other buildings and handsome private 
residences fully attest his skill as an e.ec- 
trician. Mr. Fulk has been remarkably suc- 
cessful and has won an enviable reputation 
for the excellence of his work and the uni- 
versal satisfaction given by his service. He 
is unmarried and is popular in social circles. 



SOUTH BEND 



313 



J. L. TURNER. 

Mr. J. L. Turner, the well known manufac- 
turer of high grade ice cream and confection- 
ery, at No. 232 North Main street, is a native of 
the Empire state, and was boin in the village of 
Nashville, Chautauqua County, April 18, 1854. 
His father Benjamin Turner, was a successful 
cabinet and wagon builder, and afterwards Els 
health failing he moved on a farm, and his 
mother was Mary E. (Carter) Turner. Until 
he was fifteen years of age Mr. Turner 
lived at Nashville and there attended 
the public schools. In 1865 he went 
to Baraboo, Wis,, with his mother, and he also 
went to school there. Later he clerked in the 
grocery business and then bought a faim 
which he successfully conducted for about six 
years. In 1875 he came to South Bend and 
started in the wholesale and retail milk busi- 
ness, which he has continued since with de- 
served success. Mr. Turner has a fine dairy 
tarm about one miie from the city. In 1896 
he began the manufacture of ice cream and 
confectioneiy at his present store and has 
built up a large business. He deals 



gins, and who is a lady of rare graces and at- 
tainments. Mr. Turner has five bright 
sturdy children, one boy and four girls, and re- 
sides at No. 714 Leland avenue. 




3. L. TURNER. 

both at wholesale and retail and sup- 
plies the leading hotels and private fami- 
lies. Mr. Turner is a careful business man. 
and is ably assisted by his wife, who before 
her marriage in 1883 was Miss Mary E. Hig- 



GEORGE E. GARCEAU. 

Mr. George E. Garceau the expert plumber 
and gas fitter at Nos. 122-124 West Washington 
street, whose telephone is No. 301, is a native 




GEORGE E. GARCEAU. 

of South Bend, and was born here November 
26, 1859. His father was Moses Garceau and his 
mother Margaret (Desmond) Garceau. When 
he was a child his parents removed to Elkhart 
County, and there young Garceau was reared. 
He attended the public schools and when he 
was seventeen years of age came to South Bend, 
and learned the plumbing and gas fitting trade 
with Peter Baxter, where he remained for four 
years, when he went to Chicago and was for 
seven years employed by M. J. Carboy, No. 73 
Dearborn street, one of the largest and most 
successful plumbers and gas fitters in the coun- 
try. During his experience in that city Mr. 
Garceau worked upon many of the finest build- 
ings and residences in Chicago, and was en- 
gaged in the most high class plumbing and gas 
fitting. In 1895 he returned to South Bend and 
with Mr. Frank Hunter, established the firm of 
Garceau & Hunter, which became the leading 
firm in its line here. The firm did many of the 
finest jobs in the city in its special line. 



314 



SO U T H BEND 



Among the contracts completed are that of the 
Colfax school, Jefferson school, St. Casimir 
church and school, the residence of Mr. George 
Wittwer, A. B. France, W. A. Rutherford, Frank 
Stephenson, Eugene Miller. George M. Fountain 
and many others, in 1900 Mr. Hunter retired, 
since which time Mr. Garceau has conducted 
the business alone. Mr. Garceau occupies a 
commodious store and office and carries a com- 
plete line of plumbers and gas fitters supplies, 
and does all kinds of repairing. He is unmar- 
ried and popular in business and social circles. 



J. E. McENDARFER. 

Mr. J. Edward McEndarfer, prominently 
known in the hardware and stove trade of 
South Bend, is a native of Liberty Township. 
St. Joseph County. Ind.. where he was born 
July 22, 1869. Mr. McEndarfer is a son of Eli 
F. McEndarfer. a successful farmer, and 
Lydia (Rensberger) McEndarfer. He was 
educated in the public schools of Liberty 
Township, where he graduated, supplementing 
his education by careful home study. When 
he had concluded his studies he began life as 
a teacher, and taught school in Liberty town- 
ship for five years. He then gave up teach- 
ing and came to South Bend where he en- 




E. M KNDAUKF.Ii. 



darfer admitted his brothers, George and Ben- 
jamin F., to the business under the style of 
McEndaifer Bros. In 1898 the former retired 
from the business, and in 1899 the latter with- 
drew from the firm, since which time Mr. J. E. 
McEndarfer has conducted it. The premises 
occupied are a large store, and the stock com- 
prises staple and heavy hardware, stoves, cut- 
lery, paints, glass and oils, etc. A featuie 
of the business is tinning, spouting, roofing 
ami sheet iron work. Mr. McEndarfer is a 
business man of high standing and is highly 
esteemed. He is a member of the Modern 
Samaritans. 



FRANK F. WILTROUT. 
Mr. Frank F. Wiltrout, tinsmith and metal 
worker, is located at No. 122 South Michigan 




gaged in the hardwaie business. In 1S95 the 
firm of Dressier & McEndaifer was organized, 
which continued for one year, then Mr. McEn- 



PRANK F. WILTROUT. 

street, and has won hosts of fiiends since lo- 
cating in South Bend about ten years ago. Mr. 
Wiitrout was born at Silver Lake, Kosciusko 
County, Ind.. April 21, 1862, and his father, 
Frederick Wiltrout, who is still living, was a 
merchant in that locality, and was postmaster 
at Silver Lake. Young Wiltrout was educated 
in the public schools and high school at Silver 
Lake, and after working a short time in a 
hardware store he learned the trade of a 
tinsmith. He afterward went to Frankfort, 
Ind., where he worked three years for Capt. 
Irving Poison. He also worked at his t.ade 
in Silver Lake and Chicago, where he was en- 
gaged by Norton Bros., and at Bremen, Ind., 



SOUTH BEND. 



315 



and in 1S91 he came to South Bend, where for 
two years he woiked for Mr. Irving A. Sibley. 
Mr. Wiltrout was the oiiginator of the storage 
warehouse in South Bend. In 1S95 he com- 
menced business for himself and has been re- 
markably successful. He does an extensive 
business in sheet metal work, stove repairing 
and tin roofing and his customers are among 
the leading citizens of this locality. He is a 
thorough master 01 his business, careful and 
painstaking and is very popular. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. He was 
married to Miss Mary E. Matz, of Bremen, Ind., 
and has an interesting ramily of two boys and 
two girls, and resides in his own home at No. 
312 Vistula avenue. 



WILLIAM H. BRUGGER. 
Mr. William Henry Brugger, the well 
known hardware dealer and manufacturer of 




WILLIAM H. BRUGGER. 

tin and sheet iron work, at No. 1220 West 
Washington street, was born at Adrian, Mich., 
April 17, 1850. He is a son of John and 
Justina (Beagle) Brugger. Until he was 

fifteen years of age he resided in the city of 
his birth and there attended the public 
schools. In 1865 he went to Blissfield, Mich., 
and remained there seven yeais. While 
there Mr. Brugger began his active business 
life as a grocery clerk, and continued in this 
line for three years. He then learned the 
tinners' trade, and in 1872 came to South 
Bend, and for six years was in the employ of 



Meyer & Poehlman. He then went with 
Clark & Stedman for three years, and after the 
death of Mr. dark continued with Mr. Sted- 
man for a year, when he went with France & 
Gish, and had charge of their shops until the 
firm was succeeded by living A. Sibley. He 
then had charge of Mr. Sibley's shop until 
1890, when he started in business for himself 
at his present location. Mr. Brugger has 
a large store and shop and carries a line of 
hardware and stoves. He also does all kinds 
of tinning and sheet iron work, roofing, spout- 
ing, guttering, etc. Mr. Brugger is a suc- 
cessful and popular business man and an ex- 
pert in his line. He was married June 16, 
18S0, to Miss Mary Alice Schultze, of this 
city, and resides at No. 849 Colfax avenue. 



CHARLES E. BUCHER. 

Mr. Charles E. Bucher, whose splendidly 
equipped livery establishment is located at Nos. 
316-318 West Jefferson street, has won an en- 
viable reputation in his line of business in this 
city. He is a native of Indiana, and was born 
in St. Joseph County, September 16, 1863. His 
father was Christian Bucher, a well known 
farmer in that locality. Young Bucher was 
reared on the farm and received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools in the vicinity of 




CHARLES E. BUCHER. 

his home. He was successfully engaged in 
farming until 1895 when he came to South Bend 
and engaged in the livery business in which he 



316 



SOUTH BEND. 



has been remarkably successful. Mr. Bucher 
was formerly associated with Mr. A. J. Ward, 
under the firm name of Ward & Bucher, but in 
1898 the firm was dissolved and Mr. Bucher has 
continued the business alone. He has a finely 
equipped barn and a stock of fine horses and is 
prepared at all times to furnish hacks, surreys, 
wagonettes and carriages for funerals, parties, 
theaters and private use. His rigs and equip- 
ages are all first class and courtesy and prompt- 
ness are always assured the patrons of this 
establishment. He also has boarding facilities 
for a number of horses, and conducts a sale 
stable on the highest plane. He is popular In 
the community and a member of the K. O. T. M. 
fraternity. He was married to Miss Florence 
Ward, a daughter of his former partner, and 
with his family of two children resides at No. 
316 South Lafayette street. 

DANIEL GISE. 
Mr. Daniel Gise, of the firm of Gise & Per- 
rin, real estate and investment dealers, in the 




DANIKL (USE. 

Arnold building, at 216-218 West Jefferson 
street, is a thorough, practical and progressive 
business man. He was born near Metz, in 
Steuben County, Ind„ April 28. 1863, and his 
father, John Gise, was killed in the service ot 
his country, during the war oi the Rebellion, 
while the subject of this sketch was but an 
infant. As he g;ew into boyhood he con- 
tributed to the support of the fanrhy and has 



made his way in the world unaided, save by 
his own efforts and his determination to suc- 
ceed. He worked on a farm as soon as he 
was old enough and secured his education at 
the district schools. He was engaged in this 
occupation until 1890, learned the rudiments 
of the carpenter's trade in the meantime, and 
engaged in building on a moderate scale. He 
tnen spent one year in Neb.aska and then 
came to South Bend where for nearly two years 
he engaged in the contracting business and 
erected a number of dwelling houses in the 
western part of the city. After this he en- 
gaged in the real estate business at which he 
has been successful. He is a man of in- 
domitable energy, self reliant and owes his 
business success to his own unaided efforts. 
Mr. Gise was married to Miss Alta Van Bus- 
kirk, who died some years ago. He has a 
family of three children and resides in a new 
home on Woodward avenue. 



EARL R. PERRIN. 
Mr. Earl R. Perrin, of the firm of Gise & 
Perrin. real estate dealeis of this city, is a 
native of Illinois, and was born at Lena, in 
that state, September 13, 1870. His father, 
Noah Perrin, was a prominent grain buyer in 
that section of the state. Mr. Perrin received 




EABL R. PERHIN. 

his education in Lena, and began his ca; eer in 
the mercantile business in his native town, 
and later removed to Rockford. He then en- 



SOUTH BEND. 



317 



gigged in the advertising business, traveling for 
the National Advertising Service of New York, 
and was remarkab.y successful and resource- 
ful in that line of business. He first came to 
South Bend in 1893, but remained only a short 
time, returning again in 1897, where he was 
engaged in the advertising Dusiness on his own 
account. The firm of Gise & Perrin is of recent 
organization, but both gentlemen are well 
and favorably known in the community. In 
addition to their real estate business they also 
deal extensively in mortgage loans. Their 
offices aie located in the handsome Arnold 
building Nos. 216-218 West Jefferson street. 
Mr. Perrin was married to Miss Mae Humes 
of South Bend, and resides at No. 603 South 
Michigan street. 



LOUIS KANOUSE. 
Mr. Louis Kanouse, of the well known firm 
of Kanouse & Phillips, dealers in coal and 




nois locating in Edgar County where he re- 
sided seventeen years. He was engaged in 
several lines of business there and for the 
last seven years was in the coal and wood 
trade. In 1S85 he came to South Bend and 
started in the same line under the firm name of 
Buckley, Kanouse & Co. This continued until 
Mr. Buckley's death five years later, when Mr. 
Phillips became his partner under the present 
style. Mr. Kanouse is a careful and prudent 
business man and has won deserved success. 
He was married in 1880 to Miss Virginia Davis, 
of Paris, 111., and resides at No. 429 South 
William street. 



LOUIS KANOUSE. 

wood, at 540 South Chapin street, was born at 
St. Paul, Decatur County, Ind., November 15, 
1851. He is a son of Joseph Kanouse, and 
Angeline (Shauer) Kanouse. When but a 
child his parents moved to Shelbyville, Ind., 
where his father was engaged in the wagon 
making business. Here he lived until he was 
eigtheen years of age and was educated in the 
public schools. Mr. Kanouse left home in 1S6S. 
and with his uncle, went to Northern Michigan 
where he took a lumber contract and was 
highly successful. After two years he le- 
turned to his old home and then went to 1111- 



WILLIAM R. PHILLIPS. 
Mr. William R. Phillips, of the firm of 
Kanouse & Phillips, dealer in coal and wood, 
at No. 540 South Chapin street, is a native of 
St. Joseph County. Indiana, having been born 
on a farm April 29, 1859. He comes of good 
old Revolutionary stock, his ancestors being 
from the Old Dominion. His father, Randolph 
Phillips, and his mother Lucy (Stover) Phil- 
lips, both being natives of Eastern Virginia. 
The father of Mr. Phillips died two months be- 
fore his birth, and his infancy and youth were 
spent upon the family homestead. Being 
early called as a bread winner his advantages 




WILLIAM R. PHILLIPS. 

for an education were limited to the district 
schools which he attended in the winter. When 
a young man he learned the trade of house 



318 



SOUTH BEND. 



painting which he followed for twelve years, 
when he came to South Bend. In 1890 he 
became a partner of Mr. Louis Kanouse under 
the present style of Arm in the coal and wood 
trade. Mr. Phillips is purely a self made man 
in all that the term implies. He has been 
twice married, his first wife, to whom he was 
married in 1885. being Miss Rosella Green, of 
Paris. 111. She died May 19, 1897. On June 
4, 1899, Mr. Phillips married Miss Anna Kling- 
man, of this city, and resides at No. 60S South 
Michigan street. 



CHARLES H. FRAZIER. 

Mr. Charles H. Frazier of the firm of Frazier 
Bros., dealers in bicycles and sporting goods, is 
a native of New Jersey, and was born at Fraz- 



races in which he was a contestant, and to-day 
holds more medals than, perhaps, any single 
rider in the country. He came to South- Bend 
in 1888 and for ten years was engaged in the 
machine shop of the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., 
and in 1895 he established himself in business 
on his own account. Mr. Frazier handles a 
variety of the standard makes of bicycles and 
all the necessary parts and attachments and 
has every facility for making repairs to wheels 
of all kinds. He also carries a complete stock 
of guns, ammunition and sporting and athletic 
goods of all kinds. Mr. Frazier is popular with 
bicycle riders and his establishment at 121 East 
Jefferson street is the resort of the leading 
wheelmen of the city. Mr. Frazier was mar- 
ried to Miss Clara E. Servey, of Clarion County, 
Pa., and resides on Vistula avenue. He is ;i 
member of the W. O. W. and the Woodmen's 
Bicycle Cub. 




CHARLES H. FRAZIER. 

itr's Corners, named after the family, in that 
state, April 11, 1S(J5. Mr. Frazier learned tli" 
tt&de of a machinist and for years was connect- 
ed with the celebrated Smith Machine Co., of 
Smithville, N. J., who were prominent as bicy- 
cle manufacturers in the early history of that 
industry. While with this company Mr. Fraz- 
ier became an expert cyclist and trick rider and 
toured the country in the interests of the manu- 
facturers. He won the championship medal for 
25 miles at Springfield, in 1883, and at Cleveland 
he won four medals in one day for expert fast 
bicycle riding. In almost every state he has 
succeeded in carrying off the trouphies in tha 



O. P. NOISOM. 
Mr. Ole P. Noisom has been successfully en- 
gaged in the watch making and jewelry busi- 
ness in this city since 1893, and is one of the 
best practical watchmakers in the country at 
the present time. Mr. Noisom is a native of 
Norway, and was born November 18, 1859. He 
attended school in his native country and 




o. p. NOISOM. 

learned the trade of a watchmaker in Tromso. 
Norway, serving a full and thorough appren- 
ticeship at the business. He afterward worked 



SOUTH BEND 



319 



at the business in Christiana, and traveled ex- 
tensively in Europe. In 1882 he came to 
America and reached Chicago on August 24th. 
He was engaged for several years with the 
Springfield Watch Company, of Springfield. 
111., and also worked in the great factories at 
Elgin and Aurora, but afterward returned to 
Springfield, where he remained until 1893 
when he decided to remove to South Bend and 
establish himself in business. Mr. Noisom 
has traveled extensively through the West 
and South and has an enviable record as a 
thorough and expert watchmaker. In the 
great factories he had charge of the depart- 
ments in which the finest watches were made, 
and was regarded as a perfect master of the 
business. His store is located at the corner 
of Michigan and Jefferson streets, and he 
carries a fine line of jewelry and watches and 
does all kinds of repairing. Mr. Noisom was 
married to Miss Inglebarg Johansen, a native 
of Norway, and has a family of two boys and 
two girls, and resides at 629 North Cushing 
street. 



ADOLF MOHN. 
Mr. Adolf Mohn, the well known wholesale 
dealer and importer of wines and liquors ot 
this city, is a successful merchant and his ex- 



29, 1861. His father, Adolf Mohn, was a ma- 
chinist in Germany, and well known in the 
community in which he resided. Mr. Mohn 
received his early education in his native land, 
and when nineteen years of age he emigrated 
to America, where he finished his education. 
He came to South Bend in 1880 and was em- 
ployed by the Studebaker Bros. Manufacturing 
Company, and by the Oliver Plow Works, and 
then traveled for a number of years. In 

1893 he established himself in his present 
business at which he has been successful. He 
is an extensive importer of foreign wines and 
liquors and manufactures domestic wines on 
a large scale. He owns a farm and vineyard 
of 105 acres located about eight miles north 
of the city, which is in a fine state of cultiva- 
tion, and here are located his wine presses 
and other adjuncts to the wine making business 
which he thoroughly understands. Mr. Mohn 
transacts a large business which is confined ex- 
clusively to the trade and which extends 
through Indiana, Illinois, Ohio and Michigan, 
and carries a large stock of goods at all times. 
He is well known in the community, is highly 
esteemed, and is a member of leading local 
fraternal organizations. Mr. Mohn was mar- 
ried to Miss Agnes Miller, who is a native of 
Liepsig, Germany, and with his family, con- 
sisting of seven children, resides at No. 1018 
Portage avenue. 




ADOLPH MOHN. 

tensive establishment is located at Nos. 118-120 
East Jefferson street. Mr. Mohn is a native 
of Stuttgart, Germany, and was born August 



FRED J. TEUSCHER. 

Mr. Fred J. Teuscher, the well known whole- 
sale baker, whose office and bakery is located 
at 315 West Monroe street, is a native of Swit- 
zerland, and was born November 30, 1867. 
His father was Jacob Teuscher and his mother 
Anna (Dewaulder) Teuscher. Until he was 
eighteen years of age he resided in his native 
land and received a good education in the 
schools there. In 1885 he came to America 
and settled in Crawford County, Ohio, where 
he learned the bakers trade, at which he 
worked four years in Ohio, when he went to 
Chicago, and then to Mishawaka, where he 
was engaged in the same business two years. 
In 1892 he came to South Bend and started the 
wholesale baking business in which he has 
been most successful. His bakery is a large 
two story brick building specially fitted. Mr. 
Teuscher bakes bread, cakes, cookies, pies and 
a general line of plain goods and does a large 
business. He uses only the best materials 
and his products are always the best. He was 
married in 1896 to Miss Bertha Klosner, a 
most estimable lady and has two children, a 
boy and a girl. 



320 



SOUTH BEND. 



ERNEST B. RUPEL. 
Mr. Ernest B. Rupel has practically and 
successfully demonstrated the fact that strict 
attention to business will always meet with 
fitting reward. As a wholesale dealer in no- 
ions, school supplies, etc., whose business was 




LOUIS H. RULO. 
Mr. Louis H. Rulo, senior member of the 
firm of L. H. Rulo oi Co., retail grocers and 
marketmen at Nos. 224-228 East Monroe street, 
is a native of Iowa and was born at Eldora, 
Iowa. August 27, 1858. His father was George 
W. Rulo and his mother was Calantha S. 
(Hard) Rulo. ioung Rulo was educated in 
the public schools of his native city and lived 
there until 1872 when he came to South Bend 
and engaged in the grocery business. In No- 
vember, 1SS7. Mr. Rulo, with Israel A. Staples, 
formed the present firm of L. H. Rulo & Co., 
and engaged in the grocery business. In 

1S96 Mr. Rulo built his handsome two story 
brick building at the corner of Monroe and 
Carroll streets, the lower floor of which is 
entirely utilized for the grocery and market 
business. The store is one of the largest and 
best in the city, and the stock carried is most 
complete and embraces everything in the line 
of fancy and staple groceries. The market 
is finely appointed and the firm handles the 
choicest of meats in every variety and game 
and fruits in season. A large business is 
done throughout the city and the firm is a 
popular one. Mr. Rulo is an energetic business 



ERNEST B. RUPEL. 

established in this city less than two years 
ago, he has already built up a large and ex- 
tensive trade. Mr. Rupel is a native of Cen- 
ter Township, St. Joseph County, and was bom 
October 22, 1866. He is the son of Franklin 
and Martha (Rockhill) Rupel, and his father 
was a prosperous farmer in that locality. Mr. 
Rupel attended the public schoo s of South 
Bend and graduated from the high school in 
1SS4. For ten years afterwards he followed 
the calling of a school teacher and then en- 
gaged in business pursuits. For five years he 
occupied the position of traveling salesman for 
Whiteman Bros., manufacturers of confection- 
ery, and becoming familiar with the practica 
side of commercial life, he resolved to engage 
in business for himself. In March, 1899, he 
established his present business, which em- 
braces a large and varied stock of notions and 
school supplies, and his rapidly growing trade 
extends throughout Nothern Indiana and 
Southern Michigan, and his well equipped es 
tablishment is located at 821 South Michigan 
street. Mr. Rupel is energetic and a thor- 
oughgoing business man and has won success 
by deserving it. He was married in 189:i 
to Miss Hallie Smith, and resides at 410 East 
South street. 




LOUIS 11. RULO. 

man of the highest standing. He was mar- 
ried in 1879 to Miss Adelia Casteller, and re- 
sides at No. 228 East Monroe street. Mr. 
Rulo is well known in fraternal circles and is 
a member of the Knights of Columbia and the 
Tribe of Ben Hur. 



SOUTH BEND, 



321 



HARVEY G. BALDING. 

Mr. Harvey G. Balding, the well known deal- 
er in wood and coal, whose office and yards 
are located at No, 1114 West Colfax avenue, is 
a husiness man of prominence and ability who 
has won success and the esteem of the com- 
munity. Mr. Balding is a native of Steuben 




LOUIS M. MUCHA. 

Mr. Louis M. Mucha, widely known as a 
careful educator, and also engaged in the real 
estate business at No. 822 South Webster 
street, is a gentleman who has won by his own 
efforts the high place he fills in the business 
life of our city. Mr. Mucha was born in 
Poland, July 23, 1863. As a boy he had the 
advantages of a careful training and education 
in his native land, and also in this country. He 
came to America in April, 1891. sailing direct 
to Baltimore, and then went to Chicago where 
he remained but a short time, and in July, 
1891, he came to South Bend, where he has 
since resided. Mr. Mucha has been engaged 
in teaching both at St. Hedwige's school, and 
at St. Cassimer's School, where ne is now en- 
gaged. He is also engaged in the real estate, 
insurance and loan business. He handles 
foreign exchange and represents several well 
known steamship companies. Mr. Mucha is a 
leader in Polish circles here and has done 
much to educate and benefit the Polish people. 
He is a notary public and also secretary of the 
Jan. III. Sobieski Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, one of the most substantial and enterpris- 



IIARVEY G. BALDING. 

County, Ind., and was born June 27. 1842. His 
father, George W. Balding, was a successful 
farmer in that section of the state, and his 
mother was Jane Elizabeth (Armstrong) Bald- 
ing, and both his parents were natives of New 
York state. In 1838 his parents removed from 
Western New York to Steuben County. Young 
Balding lived at home until he was twenty- 
one years of age, and he received his educa- 
tion in the country schools. In 1863 he went 
to Sturgis, Mich., where he learned the black- 
smith's trade, and remained there about six 
years, and in 1870 came to South Bend and 
worked at his trade at Studebaker's for over 
two years, when he again took up agricultural 
pursuits, and for eleven years was engaged in 
successful farming near this city. In 1S85 
Mr. Balding moved to South Bend and started 
in the wood trade, and a few years later added 
coal, hay, straw, grain, etc. Mr. Balding does 
a large business and gives p:ompt service, and 
is a careful business man and widely known. 
In 1865 Mr. Balding was married to Miss Lydia 
Weiss, and resides in his own home at No. 1114 
West Colfax avenue. 




LOUIS M. MUCHA. 

ing business institutions of the city. He is 
one of its founders and much of its success can 
be attributed to bis efforts. Mr. Mucha was 
married June 26, 1889, to Miss Anna Stopka. 
and to this union has been born two children, 



21 



322 



SOUTH BEND. 



a daughter. Maryanna, age 11 years, and a son, 
Stanislaus, age eight years. Mr. Mucha re- 
sides with his family in a cozy home at 822 
South Webster street. 



JAMES ASLIN. 



Mr. James Aslin was born at Hartfordshire, 
England, and came to Ameiica when he was 
but fourteen years of age. He first located 
at Cleveland. Ohio, where he spent several 
years and thoroughly app ied himself to learn- 
ing the trade of plumbing and gas fitting, and 
became an expert and practical man in every 
detail of that calling. He then went to Chi- 
cago, where he was engaged for four years, and 
ih 1871 he came to South Bend, and wo.ked in 
the establishment of A. T. Stevenson, a well 
known plumber and gas fitter, now deceased. 
Mr. Aslin engaged in business for himself in 
18S9 and since that time has transacted a con- 
stantly increasing business. He has been en- 
gaged by many of the lending property owners 
in this city, and fitted up the Laurel and 
Madison public school houses and other public 
buildings. He is a member of the Masonic 
and Odd Fellows fraternities, and of the 







JAMES ASLIN. 

National and State Associations of Master 
Plumbers. He is also connected with the 
South Bend Maste.- Plumber's Association and 
is the treasurer of that organization. He was 



married to Miss Sophia Pommert, of South 
Bend, and with his fami y of three children, 
resides at No. 319 South Michigan street. His 
office and workrooms are at No. lilt; South 
Michigan street, and are equipped with every 
appliance known to modern gas fitting and 
sanitary plumbing. 



REV H. F. PAANAKKEK, C. S. C. 

The Rev. H. F. Paanakker, C. S. O. pastor 
of the Sacred Heart church, on West Thomas 




REV. II. P. PAANAKKER, C. s. C. 

street, was born in Holland. January 12, 1864. 
He is the son of Bartholomaeus Paanakker. 
and Mary (Wan der Hayden) Paanakker. who 
were well known in their native country. 
Father Paanakker attended the paiochia! 
schools in Haarlem, and afterward attended the 
college at Uden. North Braband, under the 
priests of the order of the Holy Cross. He 
finished his classical and theological studies in 
Europe ana in 1894 came to America and at- 
tended Notre Dame. Here he was ordained 
to the priesthood by the Rt. Rev. Joseph Rhada- 
uiacher, in 1S96. Soon after he was appointed 
to take charge of the Catholic Belgians in 
South Bend, who were then attending services 
in St. Patrick's church. After one year ot 
zealous work he built a churcn for the Bel- 
gians, a neat trame building on West Thomas 
street, and under the leadership of Father 
Paanakker is one of the most successful of its 



SOUTH BEND. 



323 



nationality in the state. Over one hundred 
families embrace the congregation of the 
Church of the Sacred Heart, and in the school 
conducted in the basement of the church 
building. 110 scholars are in daily attendance. 
The church is a prosperous one and F